The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on December 13, 1937 · Page 4
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 4

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Monday, December 13, 1937
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PAGE POUR (ARK.) COU1UER NEWS THE BJATHEVILLE COURIER NEWS THE OOURUR NKWB (XX If, W. HAINES, Publisher Nat!oj\»l Adverting Representatives: ; Daiijts, Inc., New Vork, Chicago, Dc- co», St. botjls, Pallas, Kansas City, Published ?very Aftenioon Except Sunday <W second class mater at tlic post oil Ice at jslythevllte Arkansas, under act of Congress, October 9, 1917. Served by the United Press SUBSCRIPTION RATES By carrier in the City of Blytticvlllc, 15c per week, or 8&> per month. By mail, wllhin a radius of 50 miles, $3.00 per year. *1.50 for six months, 15o (or three montlis; by mail In postal zones -two to sl^, Inclusive, $6.50 per year; in zones seven and eight ,$10.00 per year, payable In advance, Conunon Sense Curb on lha Demagogs This business recession must, lie gulling serious. Futlior Coughlin is BUI'IIK b;ick oil t|ic lur. There was an WKlcrproudtiion of most things (Inciiif tlt« l««l depression, bill ol' one thing—(leiiuigcijy 1 — thcro WIH u HTcat glut, (I suiJonilJiniiliincG llifil 'ought to have brutiglil the (foml life miHulctl, Tlio lub-UuunpiTs iuu| llio iiiiUon-snvei'K como uj> out of the nu-. \vhcro \vhyn InisincHs imllcos full, like niglit-cniwlui's coming up out ul lUu Inwij after u rain. So wo might «s well prepiire ourselves fov i\ nq\v crop. Whether ull oi' the old fnvoi'Ucs will reappear or \vl\pthor we stwll have some briuul- no\v'01103 is not clear, just yet; but that \vo filirtll have a (kirn PCM- yield of them unless business revives is as curtail! (\s anylhing can be. Probably we shall survive the o.\- iievioiicc without nnicli diimage. A nation thai could live'tlirouirli Uie last (liwessioo can live through anything, very JiJtety, and wlml i.s ahead of us i-iin hardly bp wt>mi thini wind wo huvy upon thrqugh, But applied demagogy Is a diiiigur- uilS lilting, nevertheless, in this diiy of mass^in'opagaiuia leeliniiiues. U is dan- gerqus for the name reason thai a mitiak doctor \vith \\ s\iit'e«au' full ol' patent inwliciues is dangerous at the bedside of a man critically ill, It offers tl\e wrong sort of remedy, luul offoi's it al a time whun people feel desperate enough to try (inything. ( v It ought to ho obvious'thuf a time of jH'ufotiiui (lopro^blon is the ope time of all times when clear, unprejudiced an<| accui'ftlc thinking is needed. Yet thai, iti JUKI ivluit th.o dDinagOK dues' not offer; on (lie contrary, he offers a heavily emotional dose' which makes clear thinking miiHi.ssJulo. j| u ^ills t(1) . on people t q emofo tin,],. w « y out of their troubles, He appeals to their feel, ings yilther than to thpj)- reasons.. lie tail do this, in a depression, because there aro su many things | () K{ -I uinolioiml about. Kve|i in the best uf times, Heaven knows, lliis imperfect world is full enough of injustice and inequality; when the wheels s|o w down ami honest men arc brought faco to face with hunger aiul'want through no fault of their own, it is 10 times worse. Then the demagog l K ,s |,| s i m [ n ^ Ha has but (o point l u these crying OUT WAY wrongs, beat h(s breaul damn all (ho constituted lUithoritleB 1'of not doing something, and ofj'ci' his own panacea. Let him rouse enough honest indignation, and he can save his panacea fryin critical examination; if anyone does criticize it, he cap, cry, "llu! So yon want things to go on as they are, do you?" And there is no stopping him. No stopping him—except through the good sense of the people as a whole. In the long run, that good sense proved sufficient hist time, and it probably will again, And if this recession deepens, it will once more be put to the lest. (/o Ihtsy On Undersecretary o f btale Simmer Welles made an excellent point in his recent speech at f!eorg»; Washington University, when he remarked Unit Anu'i'ica's "gtuid neighbor" policy in Latin-American affairs has a direct application in the current upheaval in |irunil. This polley, Air. \VolIos iwinted out, calls on the United States (o refrain from minding its neighbors' 'business foi> Uwni, In other words, the kind of government Bnwi! chooses to give itself i.s .strictly Hnizil'.s concern, not ours, and our abhorrence of the Fns- cisl label should not cloud the friendly relations that exist between Brazil anil . tliis country. ' As a matter of fact, added Mr, Welles, we may be a bit hasty in pinning the Fascist label on the Vargas regime. Not all of the facts in the miittiir am known, oven now; anl for Americans to fly into a furor over » Kusdul government that may nut tuvn out to be Kascist at all is rather slily. Exit The Leviathan There ai'e at .least 2110,000 Amuri- eans— middhniged men, \vf\\; a .bit less slim and spry tha.ii they fused to be— wlio will have, a deep sentimental interest in the last voyage uf the liner LpviiiUia.u, This mighty vessel is about to go; to .(ho boneyard. Sold to the British by Urn Uniteti States Mnes, she is to be taken overset^' and broken up— a good part of her metal, no doubt, to bo used in Mritain's rearmamonl. program, And the sentimental 200,000? They are the c.vdoughljoys carried to or from I'Vance on the Leviathan during the war, Then,, if llcver before or since, tho great .ship justified her tremendous sixo. She carried more .soldjors than over before sailed on a .single vessel, And while il was not precisely a pleasure trip for any of tlie.se meji, there nre lew uf them who will bo able to read of the old ship's final trip without feeling nt. Ica^l a tiny twinge of sentiment, They 1ml alt-flown strikes In. the middle ages when they built t|\c cathedrals. But || lc -y arc unforKiunto am! proliublj- H|c B ni. j |)0 | W Ihpy won't reocoiir.—Oov. Frank Kturvhy of CaUIornla cominenlinu on the tact tli i( t' sii- ilowu .strikes are not now. By Williams *<? ou v / CAN'T WITHOUT . ee CGEAM ANC> CAKE/ f 1 CAN'T—Y JUST "H CAN'T .' I HAVE TO / BET IN. A COOPLE~ U HOURS STUDVIN6 ^ MV CORRESPONDENCE COURSE — AN~ SOME ON MV SCHOOL ice SOUR IT \AJA$N'TJ BUT IT tS, I CAN SEE HIM AT ALL THE PARTIES ] TEN VE^RS FROM , MOW, WHEN PELIVEI5IM' TH 1 ICECREAM. MONDAY, DECEMBER la, J937J SIDE GLANCES By George Clark ARNOLP, Cop»ri a U 1937, NfA S« w ie», Inc. llu lias nunrjOKt.s, pjamas—cvorylliinu « dog nmk This iiiitH ho jiiis lii.s hetirl KL>I on a cowboy suit." ,Tnis CURIOUS WORLD William Ferguson AND LEAVES OfsjL-V H(S THAT- HE MAY WATCH THE SINCE IT IS A STAR., IS USED BV SCtEMTISTS IM Tt-tEIR. STUDIES OF STAGS, APIS, THE POISON OF IS USED IN OF : POTSONS of various animals aro used considerably in Ireatinq ,iil- ments. Ri\ltlcsn»kc poison Is used in yellow fever work, and that ol Uie cobra is a. heart remedy. Vcspa, the poison of wasps, m\f, Funiiiji. llie veiiom of thc'nnl, aic used tor various afflictions, ars is also the poison of ccrtnhj snldcrt;. Arc all fossils made uf the same uialcvinl? Early Stage of Syphilis I.s Time lo Figla' LtH'onioldr Ala\i;i 'I'hit is Uic foiiflli in :i srrics ill which Or. fr'ishlicin dwnssrs uhf, cITMjl ;md trrnlinriil of diseases of Uie norvnus system. (No. ;(05I MOHKIS l'ISHI!i;iN rn^l u r thr Ameiif.ui l of iis 0 ( Uie locamotor of Uie I.V Mitnr. lljc llcaldi Among the m<»t Ecri IMurbaiiirs taiiscd \ty Is. ultlniHtc nervous .system us fur us Irols llic l>Mr)cr. Uiitorlininlcly llic iwtlcut may cvriiluull.v lasc vultinlnrlly control of nil cit tl;c organs iiwocialeil ivitli llio cxn-o- tiou of wnslc ivmtohul Iroiu tlic body. Wlllioul Miidiblc Ivnilmcnl, il is llic tendency foi (Iiis disease Bradnally to become wcin,c for many years until thr iialicnl li- lly tins -to lie in bed. Unfor- tunnlcly for llicsc patients, in soine. instances the course ol thLs ilis- rai>c requires several yeurs. In raro HIM.S lljc tyiiiptoius dctcioi) i-iiptclly. Every iwliritt willi -,\ condilmu of t|ils tori iwifi IK inuin I lie lui- medlale euro uf » eompctcnt )>iiy. s>ici»i|. It, is Imnorlunt lo wHkh the hygiene of the mlicnl. bcenuie relief tor a • great many of tho patients may be obtained by a .sulUUMe sUid,« of Ihe did 'm»| er laclors in the hygiene ol llic body. Mosl Jmpoi'l'Hiil b Ilir t-ixvlal treatment for the .syphilitic infection llirpuijhont Ihe body. This tlic doctor controls by regularly r.\- amllilug Iwtli \\\<f spinal mail and the blood, at Ihe same time Ing rrpnhirly ihr symptoms limn which llie palieiil ' si i tic re. While fciv c;t:;e.', .seem (o drvrtop i-oin- plde ein-'s. in a meal many nisrs modern methods <i[ trrnlinrnl. may brill!- HbKiit. u ,s( ( ip in tire proKtWs of the tlisfa.se. In addition Id limiuiuolor Hl»xi:i, info-lions of Iho nervous system with tlic later slaves nf tin's vo- ' lineal disease bring aboul nil sorts of strange disturbances. Tlicre ure forms o[ meningitis. of fiottcnin;; ul llic spinal cord, of tumor, of i-baiiyes- in the blood vc-sscls, anil many similar conditions, l^ov n, a |. reason every pcr- t:on \vl:o ever has lia ; i mis lovm t'f Vi'ncrral climisc, even thoucli iinrc annoinit-ed ;ls cured, should have another examiniilion ol tlio blood with Hie Wa&'lnrmanii test at fairly frequent Intervals—say at !ca;-.l every lev; s'ears-and also, iilur some time, a WaMcrmaiin tost of the spinal fluid. It i:, pesMMc in many InMinrc;. lo arit-M. Ihr luagie.^- of tl:is c(m- oilion it treatment is begun in tlie early stagci. It is ma possible ti> ou nnieli after iocomolor alaxiu lias become, well established. N'liXT: r.nrsis, ur general (•ills Want farcers TAMI'A. Flu. i UP)—Question-I naircs distribute.-I among '218 hifjli school girls bore revealed only loin were considering matrimony. More than 25 jier ceiil of the girls want to be stenographers. , \tl:l. ISS.4 t,AMj_ ketoiue. ilnrrfi. |i;irliHt. nuxi-jv iim: tiui.-iudiuuj l!U'Uilu-r uf Ilurry'n uuriy. ll.Vims Ja.WHr-iiioiKHEri m«m- !)IT Uiirry'n imtly. * « t Vi'M.'rdiiyi Aplir^Lpnsiir Ifyl <bv «(raiii( C I U »| llcupie Kuril. Iliriu. il,,i, „,„) M tII «»a y |,,,i |t. ••jvaiip. And hi «iulr ' ribumtlon "t Ike iiuimcut Ihty full iiilrtii, CHAPTER XX JUST ;it dawn a weirrt clianling " iin<( hallowing awakened 'Lissa ''Hob! Gel up, dear. Bob! It's lUirtiug already." Tlic day's festivities were indeed under way. The white couple liacl removed only theiv shoes at beci- limc, and so were peering out in a u-'jmenl or two. Already a great pile of v/ood had been assembled near the chieftain's .house and other wood bcnrcr.s were seen f.'om- iua from far and near. Apparently every villager, old and young, was i-onlrilnmng lo llie fuel supply and was making il an occasion for Hlllg. Tlie sun had not actually appeared as yet but Hie (lawn was bright gray. It would be 9 o'clock or so, Dob observed, before the actual fireball itself could appeal- over their horizon. '.This was because of Ihe sheer cliffs that hemmed, in this kingdom to pro- led anil isolate it from Ihc qul- sido world. Studying the lighl Bob decided it must bo nearly 8 o'clock even now; they had slepl very late, but they were refreshed. "We're getting ofV lo a good slurt, anyway," he said to 'Lissa. "I hope I can remember some of these chants." t 4 * |N due lime a red cliff lop to (ho westward was suddenly illuminated, as if a gigantic stage spol- liglit had been turned on. In that moment a new sound dominated the valley, and the course of action everywhere was changed First a chorus of drums—Ihe same tom-toms Bob noted, lhat Hopi Indian.- need—reverberated throughout the canyon. H was a pcnctrnling bass noise, alarming, heraldic-, of great volume. OOM-OOM. OOM-OOM OOM- OOM. The rliylJmi changed soon. OOM-OOM, (pause) OOM, (pause) OOM-OOM. This was Mnliiuied for perhaps a quarter- hour— two beats, one, then two again, and repeat. •'Remember ivlmt I (old you, Bob Barry!" 'Lissa was becoming alarmed. "If you love me you'll try to stop (his senseless business." Bpb nprfded, iu great earnestness. ''But rnaybc I can't, darting! Oyr own. lives may be endangered if I try. The maidens inay nelually \vant to be Eacri- Oced, I eertainly do no(. This is 0 delicate matter, and I'm trying to figure a way put pJ hero grace- fully—aiici safely." "It's nmrdor, Bob, nnd you know it." OOM-OOM. COM. OOM-QOM. No move wood was brought, but all were assemblying by flow. AuJ from a number of nouses came men in fantastic costumes o£ sliins ai(d paint, witli nil manner of ceremonial objects dangling frpm jlicn\. Without any sort of preliminary, these men, evidently high priests of some form signaled to (he drummers m\d the rhythm »&it\ changed. Now il became- a one, one-lwo-ljireu beat: OOM- oom-oom-oom, COM - oom - oom- oom, with douUc emphasis o» (lie first, (tone vathei- slou'ly at the otilsel but gradually geitipg a lit- l(e fasle.!-. H sccmcrt to bo perfect tiine for Iho extraorc\inary diinccs begun by (he costumed ones. * * t fHE pvjejls slanged and hopped and. chanted and ra.ttled Ihe sticks (hey held, and soon the villagers all were, chanting too to make a Tumbling background of sound. Tjiis continued for at least half an hpur, but stopped so abruptly that 'Lissa ;ilino si jumped. The chieftain of the brown pepplo walked to 'Lissa and Bob. He made Motions. "This is the moment!" ,Boh whispered. ' Robert Barry swallowed, then took a deep breath. He was still without much hope, and lie didn'i dare offend these people lest !u; anci 'Lissa themselves 'be sacrificed. But lie determined 1o fry the biggest bluff in his career. He turned ostentatiously to the sun, and mumbled a long jargon, tie winked at 'Lissa, and raised his hands to the sun. She did likewise. They sank io (heir knees. "Act it out!" Bob mumbled. 'Lissa was fremuling. Ignoring t)io four maidens, who had been brought out tied hand and foot, Bob kept pointing to the. sun and talking steadily to (he chief, gesticulating as impressively ;IE he knew how, out actually without meaning. He kept up this vnumbo-jumbo for two ori -three minutes. Then he looked imperiously at the chief and began a serious sign talk, as they hud conversed at leng(h the day before, Twice Bob had to resort to his pencil—which t|ie brown folk seemed to regard as magic anyway—but in time lie got his thoughts across. * # a gUDDENLY then the chief issued a command to iiis people. Si>; or eight hurried away, while the assembly waited, To fill in tho gap, Bob orated meaninglcssly (o the sun. When the messengers returned with live rabbits, live snakes, and other small animals, 'Lissa's curiosity popped. She hadn't spoken for nearly half nil hour. "What is il. I3ob?" slio whispered. "What's happening?" "I'm playing a hunch. Keep acting." Bob signed ;\ bit more to the chief. Then, surprisingly, he look one of the wild rabbits, killed il, skinned it >vjlji his porkct knife, all with elaborate ceremony. Each piece of the carcass 1m placed on flic great pile of wood, J>ut he presented the dressed meal portion to the ,-hief, instructing him Io cook it. Then, Bob ostentatiously cut the thongs that bound the maidens, and set (hem free. He signed Io the chieftnm and folded his arms, standing beside 'Lissa with imperious mien. The chief, duly awed by it all, shouted excitedly then Io iiis people, and the lire was lighted. Quickly there was a frenzy of yelling and jubilant dancing, : '\Vhal is il, Bob? Tell me* What, did you do?" 'Lissa clung to her lover's arm. 'I don't know where we go from here, sweetheart, but I think wo bluded that one through. I tokl them we were messengers from the real sun god, and thai he commanded an end of human sacrifice. I said this tribe is small nov.. ,--..". no more people must be SEicrificcu from il. The maidens must bear children instead. In substitute, I explained, a live beast of the fields should bo killed, and its skin tin-own on ihc fire, and the good meal eaten as a symbol oi feasling and plenty. The sun gqd ; J raid, wants eternal happiness io veign here, not pain and blood and death." She shivered a little, and snuggled closer, fascinated by the amazing pageanlry before them. "O-oh Bob!" she murmured. "Th; t's Ihc way I feel loo, "Lissu • darting." {To Be Continued) ireman Gives Blood To Aid 79 In 9 Years MEMPHIS I UP) — Because Jio ikes to feel that he Is "doing lometliing for those who cannot, iclp themselves," Fire Captain Elwiu Walilvau bus given more ban 40 fiiiarts of his blood for emergency cases at Memphis has- tals during the past nine yenrs. Doctors ,s-iy his blooti. 'girai vithoHt recompense to ll\o.sc need- ns it. in emergencies, has snvccl more than :io live;,-. Seventy-eight liine.s during the Jnsl nine years, physicians Stave icnt emergency, calls (o Wnldran md 7fi limr.s lie rushed Io the lospilul where tin: transfusions vcre made. Wnldran is 51. He intplatued vliy he gives so much blood to hose who could not. afford to pay or il nnd probably would die othenvi.sc. "I'll tell you why. The Kockc- llcrs «n;l 111? Carnegies have doncii lot for (hi: world tinctigh Iheir immense contributions ol mcncy. Me? I'm just, n litllc Irish- innn who lias to work for his llv- i ins;. But I like Io feel, too, that I am doing something for those who can't help themselves." Countess Here To Model Bust of Roosevelt SAN FRANCISCO (UP)—COUII- jless May von BornslortT, naturalized Bniniliai! citizen and imeiun- tionally known sculptor, has just arrived in the United Stales. Sr.c expects to do u bust of President Roosevelt. [ Tfie countess came directly from Europe, bringing with her Hie l;n- csl addilious to tier collection of .statuary and oil paiiuings, whisli the will exhibit (iral in Uie'Unilctl Slatc.s before returning to her home in BniKil. Tho countess says thai .she 1ms made 150 busls in bronze, moslly of famous European .statesmen. Her collection Includes- one of Uie late Pope Benedict XV. Adinir.ii IHorthy, rc(senl of liuneary. and Coiint Cinno. Uie Italian minister of foreign nlfiiirs and son-in-law of Mut.solirij. Tlie collection, v.liicli H|IO i' bringing back from her ' latcf H'oi-kiiijf tour in Europe, iiicliicle 7 busts and 15 oils. ; ConnletK von liernstoff ,is 111 wife of Ihc former wartime am bassador to Iliu United State) Their home is in Brazil, but. lit countess (inns long i r ip s i 0 Enron necessary for subject mallei- "id bolh her sculpture and painting i Following her exhibition n't s'ai Francisco, counlcss von Bernstorl w»! EO lo Washington and Nc^ York. Scotland Has Luxury Court EDINBURGEf (UP) -^ Scotland' briglite.'it ami most luxuriously fit ted couit. costing S42Q.OOO. lu\ been opened here. Every inoclcri device lias Iiccn hUrodticcti. Then arc soundproof court rooms ani Irot-pliUcs for keeping \vimn tin 1 food of juiirs. The "black mitrlii' runs direct iulo the building. OUR BOARDING HOUSE THREE MORE WEEK-S, ANOTHER YEAR WILL T= UP LIKE ALJIJT MAMIE'S BRIDGE 1 TABLE, 1 " WITH YOU LEADING OVER THE FIWI6H LINE OW AMOTHER LAP OF YOUR RACE AQAlMST WORK.' WELL,"I'VE ALREAPV MAtTE OKIE RESOUUTlOM THAT'S GQfMG TO BE KEPT K1EXT VEAR/ YOU'LL EITHER SK/ARE YOURSEL'F AM 1K1COME, OR I'M OOIM<3 TO STRAP A GP.IK1D ORQAK1 OM YOUR CHEST AMD LET YOU DO A BROTHER ACT WITH A MOMKEV iwr - ' With Major Hoople 1 WMP-f -rt-SpOT-r-T'c- ' ' 6PuT T -T --{•:- IW PE ED .' LET ME IMFORM YOU, MAPAM,THAT 1 WAVE ORGANIZED A COMPAWY, THE FUKJCTIOM C?: WHICH WILL PILL A LCKii5FI=UT WAWT PURIK1Q -Ti-|E • CHRISTMAS seAsow—' THE HOOPLE SANTA EMPLOYMBMT ACiEMcy.' ,^__ , /.•- •<-• ~x _ . / 'U~^ EMP!.Or.'v\£klT AQEMCY, IF J IT PUTS HIM TO

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