The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on June 8, 1950 · Page 12
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 12

Publication:
Location:
Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Thursday, June 8, 1950
Page:
Page 12
Start Free Trial
Cancel

i! i] r AGE Bi.yrmviLLE, (ARK.V COURIER Auti-Fascist Head Ordered to Jail 10 Other Leaders Sentenced for Contempt of Congress By DOUGLAS B. COKSKI.L WASHINGTON. June 8. lfl*l — Chairman Edward K. Barsky and 10 other leaders of the joint anti- Fascist Refugee Committee were ordered Ut jail yesterday In serve .•sentences /or contempt of Con- grew. They protest (hey are victims of an American effort to bolster fas- 'clst Spain as part of the cold war. All H, including novelist Howard F*ast, were convicted of contempt In refusing to produce, records and reports of the organisation for the House UnAmerkan Activities Com- mittea. 6 Moulds Term Barfifcy will serve six months in jail and the others—all directors of the anti-Fascist group—will serve three months. All must p.iy S.SOQ fines. All are from New York City They were given time to make .some telephone calls and say goodby to thpir families rje-fore going to the District of Columbia Jail. Their attorney, o. John Rouse, .said it probnbly won't be known until Tuesday where they will serve out their terms. News Conference Held In advance of their court appearance before Federal Judge Richard B. Keech, the defendants held a news conference and put out a statement saying that: "The meaning of our imprisonment can be found only in the U.S. attempt, for purposes of uar, to shore up the tottering structure ol fascism in Spain." The statement said that all Ihe defendants- "were victims of the cold war program." Interest in KefU);ee» The . joint anti-Fa.scist -refugee committee claims ils main interest is in aiding Republican Spanish refugees. The House, committee and the Justice Department have called it subversive and a Communist front group. Judge Keech turned down pleas by Rosge for delay in rixecutina (he sentences and for suspending reducing the Jail terms. Norrh and South Textile Group Unites To Fight Lowered Protective Tariffs TirUKSDAY, JUNE 8, 1950 WASHINGTON, June g. <#) _ fc^ Cotton textile manufacturers from! (ho North and South united yester-l v day against a common enemy lowered tariffs. They marshalled their forces before a government committee- in opposition to further concessions Involving their industry being made at nil International trade agreements conference to Torquay, England, In September. Before the committee for reciprocity information were voluminous briefs detailing the condition of the domestic industry and warning of the damage that would bo effected by crumbling tnrilf walls. Bryson I.fads Off Leading off for Ihe opponents of tariff cuts was Rep. ttryson <D- .SCJ). He said present duties on tex- liles arc 30 per cent lower than they were under the 1930 tariff act. American manufacturers, he said are facing greatly Increased competition from rchabllUnterl industry in England, Japan and other countries, arid are plagued by currency devaluations and loss of world mar- ". . . WALLS CAME TUMBLING DOWN" — Desks filitu; cnbincls and oilier oflicc furniture tumble from the fourth floor ot this condemned building in Chicago as .1 three-Ion wrecking bnll shatters the walls. Authorities ordered the building razed when (lie walls began to sng. No one was allowed lo remove the furniture because oJ the risk in entering the shaky building. Sears Reports Record Boost in Year's Sales CHICAGO, June 8. M>,— Scars. j lietfiil and m: J .il orders sales tor M.-l.v liere S1'!3,737.!«S. up n per rent from the $l!>2.f><n,5G5 in May, 1940. For the fiscal four inunllis. Rice Markets Show Little June Change DALLAS, Tex,, June 8. (&) — Rough and milled rice markets hi Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas registered few changes during the first week of June, according to the U. 8 .Department of Agriculture's production mid marketing administra^ tion. No isles of rough rk« were reported this week, since Southern farmers have only small lots left over from seeding. Nominal quola- • tions stand about Jl (o 51.50 per barrel below fast year at this time. Farm prices of rough rice averaged »fi-B8 per barrel during May. Southern milled rice markets reported less business than In recent weeks. Domestic distributors bought only moderate quantities and were turning more to th« lower priced medium grains and broken*. Bank President Named CI.ARKSVILLE, Ark., June 8. 'AD— J. \V. Hop.son, executive vice president of the Farmers National Bank here yasterday was elevated to tha presidency. Hopson succeeds the Inte R. A. Morgan, who had headed the bank since its organization up to his death last month. ymt^^i, -r..,,:%>Xi;.,. Come To Little Rock For The Big Charity i , . — . . Roebuck and company reported yes- ! I'"'' 1 ' 1 through May :J1, this year's lei-day its sales both for last month total ua.s S735,M0,l6i>. a rise of 7.4 ami for the year through Mav :i[ per cent over tne Juno, ut>8, 186 of rang up new record high tnlals. I the comparable period a y mr ago. \ Rivers Support* Bryson Rep. Rivers <a-SC) supported Brysoji's .stand against any ctit,'jay- Ing "II. should not be treason to think a little of our own interests while striving [o help others. Don't send our cotton textile down the road to destruction." ^n appeal Irom Governor Paul Uevcr of Ma-ssachuscUs was read by Ocoree P. Hhics, the state's Washington representative. Dever purtfc- nlarly proU;s(cd any tariff cuts on fine cotton goods manufactured largely in his state. Smith Challenges Graham ,„.---- RALEIGH, N.C., June 8. (AI>) _ industry walis Smith yesterday announced \our KEY to ttvurbo Sourffl New fangled methods liave yet to imitate the satisfying flavor of authentic Kentucky lionrlion— slowly and naturally made, I lien patiently oak- ripeiied in the old-fnshioned «our mash manner. For three generations OLD fn~/. IMS been made lite no other whiskey! thai he will enter i June 24 runoff primary against Senator frank Graham for North Carolina's Dem- ocratic senatorial nomination. rjr»- ham led Smith by 53,000 votes In the May 27 primary, but lacked * clear majority by 5,600 votas. OLDFITZgRALD IQNOtP SOU»JUSH_XENTUCKY STUAIGHT BOURaON WHISKEY L'RE, we know— a car is n "ncccssily' these days. A modern family "couldn't K^ along without one." Or so you icll yourself. Come, conic, sir! We know, and so do you Hie real reason you got the new-car fever -and the kind of car you arc hankering Ion wan I a cnr will) some fun ,'„ ; t don't you? A cnr you'll get u big bang out of every --every s, C ct Rnd easy mile you l come sec n-hal this beauty llocs f() the FUN you're missing! net snaps into purring life, at your toe- touch. And then note— Mow smoothly you slip away from Ihe curb-especially when Dynaflow* is ban- tiling the power transmission. How firm nnd steady the whole car feels. Mow it holds on curves, free of "heel- over" nnd sway. How each coil-sprung wheel quicksteps over bumps nnd rough spots Hint mean jounce nruf jiggle on most ^ hat s keeping you from trying one, when «he nearest Buick dealer is ready to demonstrate w.thout obligation any time you want to call on him. Rr , ? .^ ^^ ^ lo you. 4 Fxciling and R I V 0 Enlerfoining U A 1 O it p n,.,,._F,i._,.,._ lun . Nt 15-16-17-18 ow the doors switi/' open ui wurni welcome , u „ ,!„„„,, (ollo| , on (| bii[(on |f(w the broad seats invite you to lake i( c.isv ihc h,g struight-clght under the l,on- And there's no reason to miss it, really, for this strapping Iraveler is priced under many sixes. Starts at figures just nn easy step uliovo Ihe so-cullcd Lowest ['rice curs. r /Vl'lv M rtrtn^rtr tlrKR a nfi XrKCi* I. »i« J.llour SLOW, All Cl ..... Jtunper.. Munipri, Tarsdc «rd Swck »„„„. 3 inrf s G..."3 ARK. LIVESTOCK: SHOW GROUNDS « t' M. N.Rhlly, No Mniifl*!., I','"," '' "" Ad"""!"". M }1.JS ChiMrrn SO^, All liiil Tlifcci* On S«lp Oatvn l.oi»(ioni. Lilll* Rock BEST HORSE SHOW IN THE SOUTH Kiun.i .ml Kni.iritloni (,<,,„ rl'.c'f- *!" '°'' i ^'"' , B f" S1 T W LANGSTON-McWATERS BUICK CO. Walnut at Broadway Phone 555 AVAILABLE • ORDER HOW! RIGID FRAME £ TRUSS-CLEAR STEEL • ALUMINUM BUILDINGS CAPACITItS 40'WidexlOO'Loac 1MSO BUSHiLS By jhoring up 3 f<M alogg »idet »ad cad*. 13,000 BUSHflf On ih« floor twithout •horfngl Quickly trecwd - In day« Initead of weeki — to meet urgent demanih for on-the- firm grain storage. After grain is marketed,your Butler Building gives you year-round us* as implement or livestock ihelter, for hiy storage, many other farm purposes. See u> today for full informitipn oo th*se sturdy longlife building*. MDDUCI OF aj^m^jB MANKPACtWdN* *OMFANT C. A. TANT CONST. CO. Authorized Dealer For Butler Steel Buildings General Contracting P.O. Box 83 Phone 6896 Blytheville,, Ark. Anhydrous Ammonia Fertilizer Custom Application Chas. Brogdon Phones 6847 — 6234 Vi Mile South on Highway 61 GROVER'S BODY SHOP Clear Lake Ave. & Clark St. Expert Body and Fender Repair Highest Quality Auto Painting All Types Radiator Work By Highly Skilled Mechanics Every Job Guaranteed Owned & Operated by Grover Canada Phone 6981 RADIO AND TELEVISION REPAIR Factory-lYained Mechanics Any Make or Model Prompt Service Reasonable Prices 1,1 Phone 2642 We Pick Up and Deliver Fred Callihon llOSo First SI.. Riythtville SHEET METAL WORK OF ALL KINDS WHEN BE7ItR AUIOMOBIUS ARt BUIIT BUICK Will BUUD THIM Custom work for gins, alfalfa mills, oil mills. Custom Shearing up to 1/4 inch thickness, • Frank Simmons Tin Shop H7 South Broadway Phone 2651 REMODEL NOW Nothing Down—Up ro 36 Mos. to Pay It's easy lo finance your Kome improvements—or a new garage—through Builders Supply. Now you can get a low interest FHA loan with easy monthly payments. Don't delay any longer. . .call us for th« details. Builders Supply Co., Inc. South Highway 61 Phone 2434 For Expert Laundry and A JETTER LAUNDRY Dry Cleaning—Call 4474 NU-WA In England — It's the Chemist Shop In France — It's the Apothecary Shop In Blytheville — It's BARNEY'S DRUG Foi Expert PRESCRIPTION SERVICE

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 8,900+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free