The Edwardsville Intelligencer from Edwardsville, Illinois on July 15, 1916 · Page 1
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The Edwardsville Intelligencer from Edwardsville, Illinois · Page 1

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Edwardsville, Illinois
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Saturday, July 15, 1916
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(Etotmdtemlle Intelligencer JHIRDISON COUNTY'S H O M B D M I U V Flr'TY-FOt RTH YKAR--NO. 291. IDWABDBVILLK, ILLUfOMi SATURDAY, JULY 15, 1016. POUR PAGE PETITIONS ABE FILED; wars EASE THE CARES OF WAR I KORCKM CARRIED | OFF HONORS. [ Klcvrn Petitions Presented In | About One Minute. Organized force* carried tho day when at 8 o'clock this morning the office of County Ckrk Calvin J Blatt- n«r WM opened for the filing of petition* (or tho county primary. It «n» not on cnrulti political organ- iiatlon. however, but an agreement of thox" who had been In the waiting line for ovnr two days, Klevon petitions were filed w i t h i n | n nitnut* nfter the door of the clerk's, o.T.i ·) had hi'cn opened TJhe petl-i Mniis fllpd and the order In w h i c h ' tho were presented were as fo'lows: j I'alvin J lilnttner, republican, for county clerk J-I.irrv Faulkner, Granite City, republican, for M u t e s attorney. Hoy A. I.owo. Kd*ard»vllle, ro- publlian. for coroner. H M Sander.', IvUardsvlllo. re publlrun, for rrmrdrr of deeds. Jws.ie K. Simpson, KduardsWIle, tepubllran, for n f n t r » a t t o r n e y . Thom.n M i l l e t . Tro. republican, for cln i,It clerk Genrsn Crnujtmnn, Kdwnrdsvllle, r « p u b l , « a n . f o r probnte J u d j c J H Karri*, ( t r n n l f n city lomo- crat, for !ut«',i attorney. Geo D. Shaffer, Kdwardsvtlle, democrat, for rounty surveor, J . V. Streuber. Highland, republican, for stain's attorney. Jamei M Bniidv Ornnlte t'ltj dom- Of-Mt. for ntnte'n attorney. Almost fifty people had gathered In th« corridors outside the clerk's offlrr waiting to *eo what would happen w h e n the door* wore opened Tho fir«r t h i r t y necondi excitement nniplv rep ild them for tho quarter of anjURITIH SMASH ., Mln Keane. yoang American actress, is helping ease me ctre ana '.he wesjr.of Vrar ID'London. She Is entertaining London with the play .America liked so well--"Romance." Arnold Bennet, the novelist, bu · pl*y ready for Miss Keane when her present engagement ends. · liour they had spent waiting. The candidate* who hnd been I n i the waiting lino tlnro Wednesday ev- entng teemed to have acrecd that they were entitled to thn prMlrge of filing In the order In which they *at. Visitors In the corridor this morning saw large table pUced sufficiently close to tho door to act as a GERMAN LINKS barrier from one direction. Tho chairs of the candidates In line had been turned to face the wall leaving ft l l t t l n poMageway. Bark ot the stairs and between thu chain on the tnhlo were a' n u m b e r of h-ary weights and others noted for tbelr phy»lcal strength. When tho door of the offlr* opened te line slip. p*d In behind the chairs, the table and the heaving. At the same time tbosp ?am» h"nvy weights engaged In · free for all uimilo with the crowd. Chief among tho punhers were Alderman Jo* P. Hornian, Geo. C. Hartling, foreman of the Demoorftt; Carl M'i«nch. Otto Daech and b«lf a dozen other*. Former Patrolman Joe Jedllika WAS standing upon the ta ble, evidently prepared for an) eventuality. BELLEVIL1,K HAH TWO DEATHS FROM THE HEAT Two deaths due to heat were reported In Belleville Thursday. One case was that of the ten months ok child of Mr. and Mrs. Alois Chuse which died In the arms of Its grand mother, Mrs. Jacob Herr, who was walking along the street with It In the evening. John Kuppert, aged 75, owner of » large farm at New Athens, also (ell dead on the street. In a Mhnrpahooier. an official buleltln Issued b headquarters, I'nited States Marine Corps, Washington, appears the name of Murl C'orbett of thU place, ai hav- Ing qualified as a sharpshooter In that most Interentlng branch of the government service. Murl. who Is a son of C. W, Corbett, of 207 McKlnley avenue, Edwardsville, enlisted In the United States Marine Corps, at IU Pltttburg, Fa, recruiting station on January 24. 1916, and Is now serving with the tipedltlenary force of U. 8. Marines recently rUshed to Santo Domingo for the protection of the American Legation there during the current revolt ·gainst President Jlmlnes. Considering the fact that Corbett Is scarcely more than a recruit, his performance In gunnery Is looked up- in by Marine Corps ofBclals ·* very ON FOVR-MfLE FRONT. Advance b the Greatest Tl'us Fur Scored By the Big Dri,c. By ED. L. KEEN. (U. P. Staff Correspondent) London, July 15.--British troops broke the Gorman lino on a four-mile front at daw.n Friday with smashing blow that swept the British lines into tho villages of Longueval and Baz- enttn-Le-Grand and cleared the Trones wood, an advance of more than a mile. The gain Is the greatest scored for the Anglo-French offensive since the opening of the great assault thirteen days ago. . "At dawn we attacked the enemy's second system of defense said an official bulletin, from Gen, Halg, given out at 11 a. m. "We broke In hostile positions on a four-mile front capturing several strongly defended localities. Heavy fighting continues," Special dispatches from headquarters at the front announced the capture of Longueval Baientln-Le-Orand and the clearing of the Trones wood In the early hours of the fighting The blow wa* rtruck at the very sector o'f the battle front where the Germans had assembled their heaviest bodies of re-enforcements. The early bulletins though very meager, Indicated that one of the greatest battles of the allied offensive is being waged In the wooded region northeast ot Albert. mediately e.inl of Contalmalson, whoso c a p t u r e by tbe British was admitted at Berlin yesterday and slightly n o r t h w e s t of Trones wood. Tho French left wing .pushed for- w a r d at the same time, according to n n unofHiflal report from Paris, f t r n i g h t e n i n g the French lines between Hardepourt and Gulltomont and threatening the village of Maurepas. A dispatch filed at Paris at mld- nlglit reported that tn» British had pushed clear throug the Mametz wood weie desperate fighting has been going on to the Longueval road and were but BOO yards from the village. The remaining distance was coveted w i t h a rush when the offensive was resumed at daybreak. The Oeiman position at Pozlerea on the Bapaume highway has been extremely critical by the British advance Paris reported. AFFRAY STARTED BY I1OTH CLAIMING SWEETHEART. Collinsville Girl Arrested For Fighting In Confectionery. A flstic encounter In a Collinsville confectionery between Mlssea Marie Mortiz and Ruby Batteau yesterday because both claimed the eame sweetheart resulted in the arrtst la Collinsville last evening pf Miss Loftis on a charge of disturbing the peace. Direct details of the affray between the two young ladies could not be secured because no one was an eye witness to the sparring match, except tho proprietor of the confectionery, who did not see the finish because he rushed from the establisment to summon an officer. The affair began in the candy kitchen shortly after noon yesterday when the young ladies entered tho place on Main street together apparently in the most friendly mood. They were enjoying ice cream sodas together, when one of the party accused the other of being "out with Tom again last evening." " The other girl defended herself, and tn a few minutes a friendly argument ensued. It did not last long however, for shortly afterwards both became very angry and appealed to the proprietor which of the two was right, The proprietor shielded behind the tall soda fountain decided ht. was neutral and then the only thlni, left for the argument to be dccidej was to fight. They did fight. It was not however Just a little girlish "scrap," but things livened up and both began to land hard blows. When the police arrived both young ladles were exhibiting torn, drosses, fallen hair and bruise* and gashes about their face and arms. The proprietor called It 4 draw and Miss Moritz had a warrant issued for her rival. The case- will be tried In a Justice court In Collinsville Monday. BROTHER VS. BROTHER TO BE CARD WHEN DETROIT-TIGERS MEET CLEVELAND INDIANS ·Brother vs. Brother win be the card offered when Hughe* Jennings and Lee Fohl select their pitchers during the next series be- .tween Detroit and Cleveland. · Such a treat was suggested earlier in the season, the Idea being to pit Stanley Coveleekie, spit- bailer of the pace-making Indians* against Harry Coveleskie,* the veteran left-hander of the Tiger staff, but Harry, weakened at the eleventh hour, begging off on the ground that he didn't want to show up "the kid." Stanley is a right-handed spitball artist, 27 years of age and stands 5 feet 9 inches tall. Cleveland signed him during the winter. STANLEY COVliLESKlE. ELECTION CALL OUT HUNGRY SOLDIERS RAID NEIGHBORHOOD OF DEPOT Kansas City, Mo., July 15.--Angered because officers ordered them DATE FOR SELECTION OF COUN TY CLERK IS DETERMINED. Fi«d Henke, Chairman of County Board Takes Official Action Fred Henke, chairman of the county board of supervisors, has sent to County Clerk Calvin J. Blattr.er, a call for a special primary to select candidates to fill the vacancy caused by the death of the late County Clerk Harry J. Mackinaw. The call Just sent to the clerk, reads as follows: "To Calvin Blattner, clerk pro tern of the county court of Madison county In the state of Illinois. "Whereas, by reason of the death of Harry J. Mackinaw, a vacancy exists 'n the office of the clerk of th county court of Madison county, Illinois, "Now, therefore, I, Fred Henke, chairman of the Board of Supervisors, of Madison county, Illinois, do hereby by reason of said vacancy In clerk's office of Madison COLLINSVDLLE PLANT WOULD DO AWAY WITH TROCBLE. Places Matter in the Hands of Its Expert Chemist lorce. The St. Louis Smelting and Refining Company, operating the Collins- vine lead works, is determined to find out Just what effect the fumes trom the works have on the surrounding vegetation, how far It Is manifested, and whether it can be done away with. To -accomplish this they have turned the attention of their chemists on the problem, and the department has added several experts, one from California. These men are going through the flolds, bottling air at different distances, trying gases of different degrees of density and the like. The company has been made defendant In a number of damage suits wherein property owners IN AN ECLIPSE BRIMJANCY WAS NOTICEABLY DIMfED FOR A TIME. Saw Shadow But Didn't Think Of An Eclipse. Last night's eclipse of th e moon was watched with interest by many Edwardsville people. Some bad been prepared for it and were able to detect the moment the moon entered the shadow. Others aaw the shadow after It became more perceptible while others wondered what made the moon lose Its brightness and form without thinking of an eclipse. The eclipse was visible generally n North and South America and he West Indies and In part of western, Europe and Africa, In Edwardsville the moon entered h e shadow about 9:20* and remain- i d until after 1 o'clock. The darkest teriod was reached around 10:30 i'clock. This was the third of five ecllp- es due during tho year. Three are if the sun and two of the moon. The first was a partial eclipse if the moon on January 20, visible here. The next was an eclipse of he sun on February 3. It was al- o visible here. The fourth will be n annualar eclipse of the sun In- Islble here and th e fifth on Decem- er 24 will be a partial eclipse of he sun visible only in the Southern Dcean. ered because officers ordered them Bald county clerk's office of Madison to remain on their trains members | county state of Illinois, command M* + K.* vi«u«i. «.r n n n «_u.._.*i4~ Y _ « VOU to tf*ftllRa Is New York Attorney. Delos Haynes, son of L. G. Haynes, head of the East St. LouH and Suburban Railway Company and Its allied Interests, has recently become a member of the firm of Emery, Booth, Janoey Varnay, lawyers of New York City. Haynes has been placed in the patent and t r a d e \ m a r k department. Couple From East St. John House, 32, and Mtsu Bertie Eckert, 38, both of East St. I.ouls, were married by County Judge H. B. Eaton at the court house this morn- The groom Is a moulder, The British advance apparently was in the direction of Martlnpuch Height* and the plateau dominating the road leading to Bapaume, the immediate objective of the British at. tack. The village o fLongueval lies at tho Intersection of the Bapaume Bray and Albert-Combles highways, but seven mile a southwest of Bapaume. -Bazentln-Le-Oraud lies ira- Fred Hydorn, threshing on the Bohm farm west of town made a record run yesterday morning when his machine threshed 897 bushel* In a half day. The machine was timed end It averaged three bushels of wheat a minute. Mr. Bohm has 200 acres of good wheat which will average about 25 bushels to the acre, of the Eighth Massachusetts Infan try last night detrained through tho car windows and raided lunch counters, fruit stands and saloons in the vicinity of the Union Station. Twenty policemen broke up the raid after they had loaded twelve guardsmen int othe aptrol wagon. The men had not been off the train since leaving Fort Fleming, Mass., and had been fed nothing but beans and corned beef. Capt. Porter Chaae inspected the places damaged and told the proprietors to send In a bill of complaint to Col, Frank Graves at El Paso. you to "A Primary Election to be held In the county of Madison, state of Illinois on t,he 13th day of September, A. D., 1916, for the purpose of nominating candidates to fill said vacancy of which you will give fifteen days notice In comformity with the Statutes in such case made and provided. sought to recover because of alleged injurious effects due to the spreading of the heavy gases from tho stack, which instead of rising come down to the ground. Som e scientists claim that these gases may be retained and. refined Into acids and other valuable chemicals. But whether this may be done or npt the company is aoxlous first' of all to learn the ecects upon vegetation of the neighborhood. Shot Her Husband. Miss Emma Alexander a negress, was arrested yesterday at her home In CoHinsvllle an hour after shp shot and seriously wiunded her husband William Alexander during a family quar-ei Alexander was shot in the abdomen nnd right thigh. The woman Was brought to the "In testimony whereof, I hereto set my hand. Dated In tha City of Edwardsville In the county of Malison and state of Illinois, this 14th day of Jufy A. D., 1916. "FRED HENKE, 'Chairman of the Board of Supervisors of tt»e County of Madison, and State of Illinois." toun'y jail action of the d'and Jury. yesterday to await N N N N \ N N \ \ DO YOU KNOW THAT 'intelligent motherhood conserves the nation's beat Heavy eating like heavy drinking shortens life. The registration of sickness is even mow Important than the registration of deaths? The U. 8. Public Health Service co-operates with state and local authorities to improve rural sanitation? Many ft severe cold ends in tuberculosis 7 , Sedentary h*biU shorten lifer Neglected adenoids and defective teeth In childhood menace adult health? A low infant mortality rate indicates high community Intelli- gnece? X X * ' X X it Announce a Daughter. Edwardsville friends were ap- priesed today of the birth this morn Ing of a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Diel. of St. Louis. Mrs. Dlel was Miss Jesale WcKee,- of Edwardsville. · Victim of Auto Mishap. George H. Phelan, 65 years old, died at his homo on Washington avenue, Alton, Thursday morning On May 19 he was injured In an automobile accident from which he never recoveied. He was a glass blower by trade a»d had been a resldenit of Alton 43 years. He was a member of several lodges. He leaves a wife and one daughter, Mrs. Edward H. Dorsy ; of Alton and one brother, Alonsa Phelan, of Mas- aillon, Ohio. The funeral will bo held this afternoon. X X X .« X X X X X X X Benefit For Team. Members of the Edwardmville firemen's running team are busy this week selling tickets for the show at the Wildey theatre Monday night which will be given as a benefit for the team. The proceeds from the entertainment will be given the team to help defray the expenses of their trip to Kankakee next week. Eight reels of pictures will be shown among which will be pictures of the local team in action and the way the New York firemen fight the gigantic flames. Atwo reel drama will be ahown mtitled "The Wrecker" featuring Miss Edna White daughter of Bherlff White of Jackson county, Illinois. Everyone Is invited to attend and New York, July 15.--Despite the torrid wave the .rate of new cases In the ta fan tile paralysis epidemic continued Do show a marked de-. clloe In figures tabulated by the health department today. The mercury reached 86 at 11 a. m. \ Only 117 new cases have been reported In the last 24 hours as against 162 yesterday. Twenty-four, babies have died In the past twenty- four hours. The total number Of deaths thua,|the Ifttest model' The engine is fir is 311. ,' marvel for quiet and power. Standard OH Fire. Whiting, Ind., July 15--Four sections of the Immense Standard Oil Company's plants were damaged when flames originating from a bursting radiator x were * transferred through a four-batter condenser. The damage' U estimated at $250,000. To Attend Convention. George E. Little and John Rels will depart tomorrow for Mooseheart ,thls state, where they will attend a convention of the Loyal Order of Moose. Mr. Little goes as a delegate. · To Restrict Film Stan. Chicago, July 15--Mary Pickford nd Honus Wagacr, and Charley Chaplin and Walter Johnson will all e in the same boat if plans advanc- d by moving picture producers, leeting heer are carried out. Carl Laemmle, president of tho Universal Film Co , advocated organization of a new national board of trade of moving picture producers, modelled on the National Baseball Commission in which restrictions are binding on movie players just like those on the white slaves of the diamond. "We want a 'ten-day clause' in all our contracts with actions'* Opctas Xew Office. David F. Doubt, an Kdwardsvllle attorney, this morning removed hid office from the Bank of Edwardsville building, here, to St. Louis, where he opened today a magnifi- cicnt office in Suite 625 Wainwright Building. Mr. Doubt will Journey to and from his work on th e electric cars and will handle the local busioess at his home. , to assist the boys who Edwardsville at Kanka- , Has Steams-Knight. Sheriff Jenkln Jenkins !· out in a jnew Steams-Knight four cylinder of said, " York could ar e urged will boost tee. Concerning the picture to be fea- :ured Robert Adamlson, commissioner of the city of New York every person la New see the picture and learn the lessons of fire prevention it teaches." Announcement was made this morntag that Edward Dunstedter has consented to play at the Wildey the evening of the performance. This will be his first public appearance here since he went to Granite City' several months ago. It was alao announced today that the state fire marshall'-s office would send a man here to attend the performance and that h e would bring ft number of slides which will be shown in connection with the remainder of the program. Famous Raoer Hurtt Cleveland, O.. July 15.-- Ed. P. (Pop) Geers of Jlempla, Tenn. grand old man of the light harness racing world, was thrown from H sulkey and injured at the North Randall track when his pacer. Sir Anthony Carter, trying to score, ran into a harrow which was being used to repair the track. Ltizle Brown, Charlie Valentine's mare stepped on Geer's head. Death at Madison. Word has been received here of th e death at Madison this week of Miss Hazel, fifteen-year-old daughter ot Mr and Mrs. William Zentgraf. The body was taken yesterday to Utchfield, the former family residence, where services were conducted In the First Methodtat church. THE WEATHER. TO CHEERFUL OIEH/D I've. Kfcjd . life oP up3 'fc.rvd dowr\* VAtrv ^vnny fey» Stormy Urvtil pltarv eta e.11 "tke time, fe-w would bore rv\e. we the news all the time fa the "I" Fair and «ontfn«e*

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