The Ithaca Journal from Ithaca, New York on February 23, 1970 · Page 13
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The Ithaca Journal from Ithaca, New York · Page 13

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Ithaca, New York
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Monday, February 23, 1970
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Page 13
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- L . ( 1 di H di o tt a T a II, a On o Expected at Cornell University Ithaca Area to Get By PATRICIA NORDHEIMER Journal Staff Writer Almost $3 million a year more in salaries may find its way into the Ithaca area annually through Cornell University, probably , starting in April and July. , This is expected to be the impact of an Albany collective- bargaining agreement between the Governor's negotiating team and the State Civil Service Employes Assn. Their bargaining produced accord on wage increases for covered state $ employesat least the members , of CSEAof either 712 per cent or $750, beginning paritally April 1. and a minimum wage of $6,000 by April 1, 1971 for all workers. If precedents are followed, nonCSEA state employes will also get the raises, and employes of " the state's four contract colleges at Cornell University will get Churches Ponder Question Of TaxExemptioni , By JUDITH HORSTMAN Journal Staff Writer Should churches pay taxes? The question becomes a timely one for Presbyterian churches in the Geneva Presbytery, which proposed that the 68 churches under its jurisdiction voluntarily abandon their . tax-exempt status. Delegates passed a resolution calling upon churches to stop claiming tax exemptions on income-producing real and personal property, and to take only partial exemptions on property used for worship, religious education, or the housing of clergy. Individual churches will decide whether or not to follow the recommendations. "What has been suggested is that the church come to grips with how many community services it receives like fire and police protection, for , example and determine to what extent the community 7 supports the church," said the Rev. Tom Lang, pastor of the . Presbyterian Church of Spencer, which belongs to the Geneva Presbytery. "The first concern was that churches make money from services it receives like fire and police protection, for example and determine to what extent the community supports the church," said the Rev. Tom Lang, pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Spencer, which belongs to the Geneva Presbytery. "The first concern was that , churches make money from , investments in mutual funds and -'other things. Shouldn't they be taxed on their earnings? Maybe even something as sacred as the sanctuary and the manse should be taxed," he said. - "I'm in favor of it," he added. "We have all too long felt the church was good for the whole community, and that the whole community should support the church. If you pay your own way, you can call the shots. If you accept the subsidy, you'd better shut up when political and other issues come up." The Rev. Lang, who said his congregation has had the question under discussion for at least two years, said he has asked the Spencer village assessor to bring the tax assessment on the church up to date. "It isn't up . to date because it , was never on the tax rolls," he said. "When we know our assessment, we can figure out what village services we have been using, and what we should be paving. 'other things. Shouldn't they be taxed on their earnings? Maybe even something as sacred as the sanctuary and the manse should be taxed," he said. "I'm in favor of it," he added. "We have all too long felt the church was good for the whole community, and that the whole community should support the church. If you pay your own way, you can call the shots. If you accept the subsidy, you'd better shut up when political and other issues come up." The Rev. Lang, who said his congregation has had the question under discussion for at least two years, said he has asked the Spencer village assessor to bring the tax assessment on the church up to date. "It isn't up . to date because it was never on the tax rolls," he said. "When we know our assessment, we can figure out what village services we have been using, and what we should be paying. "The church should pay its own way. Religion and the , meaning of our religion should be able to stand on its own two feet." While the Spencer - Presbyterian Church feels it should pay its own way, other smaller churches are faced with the problem of where the tax money will come from. , Lewis Beardsley, a licensed Episcopalian Lay Reader who serves the Burdett Presbyterian Church, feels that the fact that the individual church can decide to abide by the resolution or not is important. "This (tax issue) has caused us concern," he said. "The question of taxes hasn't been County Legislators To Vote The Tompkins County Board of Representatives is scheduled to decide tonight on abolishing the position of Tompkins County Human Rights Commission director, and replacing it with , the position of co-directors in order to facilitate the appointments of M. Barry Herbert Sr. of 600 Warren Rd. and Richard S. Rubin of 709 , Triphammer Rd. The two men had been selected as co-directors by the Human 'Rights Commission, and endorsed by the board's Intergovernmental Relations Committee, but final board approval was stalled at the last meeting because of the absence of a specific position for co directors. The board is expected to create, the new position and them, too. And if the Agriculture, Veterinary, Human Ecology and Industrial and Labor Relations employes at Cornell get their state raises, employes of the privately endowed colleges within the university will probably also have their salaries brought into line with those on the Upper Campus. Directly, the decision will affect some 2,000 non-academic employes in the state colleges and perhaps 800 faculty members, at a cost for the total increase there of about S1.6 million. The money will come from the state to pay it, except in cases where state-college employes are also partially supported from federal funds. There are about 1,400 non The I Ithaca I Journal' I PAGE 13 Monday, February 23, 19701 brought to Session at Burdett yet, though one of our :members was at the Geneva Presbytery. One of the reasons an Episcopalian Lay Reader is serving a Presbyterian Church is because the church hasn't been able for the past few years to afford a full-time pastor. How can we afford to pay taxes.?" The First Presbyterian Church of Ithaca is in a different was at the Geneva Presbytery. One of the reasons an Episcopalian Lay Reader is serving a Presbyterian Church is because the church hasn't been able for the past few years to afford a full-time pastor. How can we afford to pay taxes.?" The First Presbyterian Church of Ithaca is in a different Presbytery which has not yet rtiled on the question of taxes. "The church has had this under discussion, though," said the Rev. Jack Thomas, associate pastor. "The General Assembly, the national Presbyterian authority, has suggested all Presbyterian churches make some contribution in lieu of taxes. "While we don't plan to do anything this fiscal year, the primary reason is that it hasn't been thoroughly discussed." The Rev. Mr. Thomas described the Geneva Presbytery proposal as "a change in thought. The church used to accept its tax exempt status as indirect community support. Many churches now wonder if they can continue to accept this. I'm not sure if it's constitutional. "This very question is under discussion in the Supreme Court flow,", he said. "This should settle the question. If the Supreme Court says it's not consitutional, then that's that." Some of the suggestions that have been discussed informally by the congregation of the Ithaca First Presbyterian Church are: To pay tuition for children in public schools who are living in tax-exempt church houses. That the church make a contribution to the city for fire and police protection and other services taxes provide. That all or some of the church property be placed on the tax roles. "We have no income producing property," the Rev. Thomas said. "There would be no question in the minds of this congregation that income producing property not go on the tax roles." approve the appointments at the 7:30 p.m. session in the second-floor Court House chambers. , Other business on the agenda includes: Approval of transfers of funds from the County Road Fund for county and state snow removal. Additional appropriations called for are $45.000 for personal services, $15,000 for materials, and $65,000 for rentals, in the area of county snow removal, and $20,000 for personal services and $40,000 for rentals for state snow removal. All expenditures for state snow removal are completely. reimbursable by the state. A state legislature amendment which would increase from $500 to $2,500 the maximum penalty for water pollution violation, and from $100 academic employes in the privately endowed collegesArts and Sciences, Art, Architecture and Planning, Hotel, Engineering, Law, the Graduate Schoolwhose salaries would also probably be made competitive, at a cost estimated at $1.2 million a year. In keeping with tradition of waiting out the fiscal year, where no state mandate is involved, hikes would probably take effect July L Endowed-college faculty is less likely to have income affected, due to the relatively high level of salaries prevailing there already. The mandate for a minimum $6,000, if it were to take effect today, would affect about 500 state-college employes generally ,..o., , , ,. r - . ., t 117-------: tAf. 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Toy train repairman v v Toy Train Collector Sets By JUDITH HORSTMAN Journal Staff Writer If you hear someone whistling "I've Been Working on the Railroad," don't be surprised. Its probably just Cornell student Preston Richards as he hovers happily over the innards of some ancient toy train. Richards, a toy train collector and enthusiast, has set up shop in his limited 530 E. State St. living quarters where he buys. sells, and repairs what he calls "strictly toy trains, not scale stuff. His specialty is the old 0 gauge Lionel and American Flyer toy trains like everyone used to have running around under their Christmas trees. These older. bigger trains have been largely replaced today by the newer and much smaller true-scale HO and N gauge model trains. but Richards finds a ready market for his toys. Customers come from as far as Elmira and Cortland and he On Rights io $500 the additional penalty for each day during which violation continues, with the fine for criminal liability placed at not less than $500 nor more than $2.500 instead of not less than WO nor more than $500. A state amendment to increase from $1,000 to $2.500 the maximum penalty for violation of code or rule of the air pollution control board, and from $200 to $500 the maximum additional penalty for each day during which violation continues. A state bill providing that state property, used for other than public purposes. and from which the state is receiving a partial or entire revenue. shall not be exempt from taxation. A state resolution making all provisions of the state Election Law pertaining to application for $3 in the categories of farm workers, groundsmen, janitors and basic clerical help. However, the state formula calls for phasing of the hikes, with, if the $750 is the applicable figure, a 000 increment beginning in April and another $250 added Oct. 1, so that by the April 1, 1971 date most workers are expected to reach the new minimum without undue added cost. Precedents that indicate the forecast of all Cornell's state-college employes getting the CSEA-bargained raises date back to a 1943 ruling by the state attorney general, prompted by then-Governor Thomas E. Dewey. Prior to that there had been across-the-board raises for state employes, but the attorney general had issued an opinion that the state-college employes Preston Richards eyes a caboose he's toy train shop. trades with collectors across the country. "It's nostalgia," he says. "It brings back memories of childhood. especially around Christmas. And they're beautiful." The shelves and boxes around the room are filled with locomotives that light up. whistle and blow smoke, and cars that load and unload everything from logs to coal to milk cans. He says that he has repaired and restored almost "everything connected with toy trains: locomotives, cars. transformers, stations and other accessories. "Lionel made a whole line of accessories," he said, "and they go out of here pretty fast. I've got a waiting list for them. He does his repair and restoration work with a combination sanding disk-wire brush-drill-jig saw tool, assorted screw drivers and pliers, and a Directors any voting by absentee ballot at general elections, applicable with the same force and effect to-special elections and including the powers and duties conferred upon public office or body. A amendment to the state Military Law, which would require that expenses and compensation of troops used in civil disorders be paid by the state instead of by the county or city. A state amendment providing that in the county, city or town where the total of exemptions granted on real property is 40 percent or more of the total assessed value, the amount of state aid to that area in that fiscal year be increased by 25 per cent above the amount , of state aid otherwise provided by law. Million Increase should not be affected by it. A new ruling was sought in the 1943 hike case, and the opinion first drafted was to the same effectnone for state colleges. Dewey disagreed, and his attorney general re-drafted the order to count state-college workers in. All the blanket hikes since have been received by Cornell Upper Campus workers. The university has made the Lower Campus positions equal. There is no reimbursement money for them, however. What will happen, with the university already plagued by an increasing deficit of several millions? The immediate effect is expected to be an increase in the deficit, and a tightening up on hirings. Already, department planning to remodel soldering gun. "If it doesn't run, the first thing you do is look at the wires," he said. "They always break. Most of the time, though. there's nothing really wrong with the stuff, but it's dirty." It takes Richards two hours to take a locomotive apart, piece by tiny piece, and clean it up. If there is a piece missing, it's not likely he'll find it in the present Lionel catalogue, especially if the train he's working on is 15 or 20 years old. "I buy stuff in any condition. even broken." he said. "I can always get one good piece out of it." Richards started his collection at age two, when he was presented with a Lionel train set for Christmas. About six years ago. he started idly asking other kids if they had any train sets they wanted to sell. On kid had what he described as "a really ole set, an antique" and he was off on his collection. Now he has more than 500 cars and 50 locomotives in his Alexandria. Va., home. He plans to move his collection here as soon as he finds a larger living quarters-shop combination. "I'm a little pressed for space," he said, looking around his 15-by-15-foot bedroom-shop packed with toy trains. Richards is also hoping to buy a pick-up truck to haul his stuff around in, since his Midget MG is a little small for his needs. In addition to his toy train business and his studies as a third-year civil engineering student majoring in transportation. Richards has a tube delivery route for The Ithaca Journal that takes up most of his late afternoons and evenings. "It's going to be a fun semester," he said with a grin. Richards spent a summer working as a brakeman on the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomas Railroad, and is - , Journal Photo by George Clay in his 530 E. State St. Up Shop planning to work in systems analysis for a railroad after he graduates. "I'll probably always continue this as a part-time hobby or business," he said, sweeping his hand around the train-crammed room. "I'll never get away from it, because I just love em. It really appeals to me. "Some kids go crazy over their cars, buying all kinds of fancy stuff for them. fussing over them all the time. I just like my trains." How about owning a real train some day? "It's a possibility," he said. "I know of some people who bought a luxury passenger car for $10,000. Beautiful. It's got everything, just like a home. They pay the railroad to hitch it onto a freight train, and run up to New York whenever they feel like it, rent a place on a siding, and live out of it for the trip. You could go across the country that way.' Abram Runs For Senate WESTON, Mass. (AP ) Brandeis University President Morris B. Abram today. announced he would resign to run for the U.S. Senate from New York. Abram maintains alegal resi- dence in Pawling, N.Y. The 51-year-old lawyer has been president of Brandeis since 1968. He has reportedly been urged by New York Democrats to run for the seat now held by Republican Charles Goodell. In the early 1950's Abram gained national repute when he filed a suit questioning the voting system in his native Georgia. Thesuit resulted in the one man-one vote U.S. Supreme Court decision. 4, in Salaries heads are having to justify filling vacant jobs. Some Day Hall sources think the strictures will increase to the point where a central-administration decision will be required to secure a new employe in almost every instance. The number of jobs may well be reduced. No mass firings or layoffs are expected, at any level, although it is possible that changes in organization of work will be made in the interest of more economical operation. Planners see, in the long run, more instances of cooperative effort among colleges and universities in the regionsuch as are occurring in libraries, with the associated schools picking their fields in which to excel in collections and not State '18' Vote Vote Soon? ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) A showdown on the question of lowering New York's voting age was taking shape in the legislature today, as state lawmakers pursued business-as-usual on the Washington's Birthday holiday. Senate Majority Leader Earl F W. Brydges said he was ready to move this week with his pro- u posed state constitutional amendment seeking to drop the voting age in this state from 21 to 18. "I may go with it on Tuesday," he told The Associated Press. The Niagara Falls Republican thus pointed the Senate on a collision course with the As- Ton sembly, where Republican 'on Speaker Perry B. Duryea is the pushing a different voting-age t od plan. Con Brydges' measure would low- H, er the age directly to 18 in time Cori for the 1972 election, extending affa the franchise to about a million young people. Approval would 0 be needed by both the 1970 and Jac 1971 legislatures and then by pre: New York voters before the seci change could become effective. M. , Duryea's amendment, which Tre would have to travel the same wel approval route, would drop the voting age in three stepsfirst M to 20 in 1972, then to 19 in 1978 Mei and finally to 18 in 1984. corr "That doesn't really satisfy witi anyone," Brydges said.. "If wit there's anything in this, it's the Con age 18." waE Brydges, once opposed to low- of I ering the voting age, changed 1951 course earlier this year and de- mel dared it was time to put the B: question to a test. His impend- in 1 ing move in the Senate was re- H garded as an attempt to force the Duryea's hand. Duryea says he 195 is waiting for public reaction to 1961 his plan to jell. Citi Gov. Rockefeller also has Her called for a one-step change to fon 18-year-old voting. But constitu- fun, tional amendments do not require his signature, so his role The is strictly that of a sidelines ad- cm, vocate. pre Brydges originally had main- Bui tamed that any change in the Btu , voting age should be accompan- gra led by similar changes in state and laws dealing with legal maturi- En1 tyfor example, the right to enter into contracts. But research Is showed there are 1,483 such re- cor ferences in present law, he re- wel , ported. H. Accordingly, Brydges said, he Co! will recommend that the legisla- Go ture act now on the basic ques- an tion and use the interval between the 1970 and 1971 sessions to sort out the other changes it might all make. Co Although most state offices BrI were closed for the legal observance of Washington's birth- Ka day, both houses of the legisla- D Er tune scheduled routine working Jol sessions for this afternoon. No t major bills were up for action, D a however. J. Ho During the weekend recess I there were these developments: t Rockefeller submitted his Gal: program bill proposed to raise c. the minimum hourly wage in New York State from $160 to p $185, effective July 1. The thr measure contains a provision va that would increase the mini- Ge mum further, to a maximum of yei lt, $2 if the federal minimum were we raised to that level. Mr f The State AFL-CIO sent to Re 3 each legislator a special mem- rel orandum backing Rockefeller's we request for a $10 increase in tLe All present $65 maximum weekly rel benefit paid under the unems ployment insurance program. wz e The labor organization also ex- on n pressed strong support for a an s plan espoused by prominent Re- GE y publican lawmakers to provide additional payments of up to 30 se per cent for unemployed work-ye n ens with dependents. H, e State Comptroller Arthur AI t- Levitt made another appeal to B, r- the legislature to require the rE e governor to submit a five-year E e financial plan along with his an- w nual budget. forcing prices up by competing for the same collections. On a larger scale, university decisions may turn toward keeping and strengthening excellent and promising departments, and dropping others in which the same quality or interest has not been or cannot be maintained. No firm decisions about timing of wage hikes or precisely how they will be administered have been announced in Day Hall, although Cornell is expected by long-term observers to follow the state's long-standing practice and the university's own precedents in covering the state-college workers, as agreed in the Governor's bargaining, and following suit for comparable employes throughout the rest of the campus. 440,mio 3.,... , , ,,,,,,,, ., ,,,, ,GIV I . f '1 . r : ' ItionikomiC41100 ,.. , trsol::::1,,,,,, ks )101I 4 RAYMOND F. MeELWEE nited Fund Names President Raymond F. McElwee was named president of the Tompkins County United Fund at the 13th annual meeting at noon today at the Women's Community Building. He succeeds Steven Muller, Cornell vice president for public affairs. Other officers elected were Jackson O. Hall, first vice president; Raymond VanHoutte, second vice president; Joseph M. Hartnett, re-elected Treasurer, and Mrs. Richard L. Webster, renamed secretary. McElwee, a partner in D. W. McElwee & Sons, general contractors, has been associated with United Fund activities and with the former Ithaca Community Chest since 1951. He was a member and a chairman of the Budget Committee from 1951 thru 1958. He is a past member and officer of the Board, to which he was renamed in 1969. He has been associated with the Chamber of Commerce since 1952 and is a past president. In 1961 he was chairman of the Citizens Committee for Urban Renewal. He is a member, former president and building fund chairman of The Friends of Ithaca College. He is a trustee of The Savings Bank of Tompkins County and is a member and past president of the Ithaca Master Builders and the Ithaca-Cortland Builders Exchange. He is a graduate of Ithaca High School and of the Cornell School of Civil Engineering. Named to the executive committee with the officers were J. Richard Agard, Thomas H. Bennett, Mrs. Joseph P. Cosentini, Paul Crance Jr., Gordon L. Black, C. W. Sadd, and Muller. Town and village appointments to the board were confirmed as follows: Brooktondale, Frank Proto; Slaterville Springs, Lars Kallstrom; Danby, Robert Dorn; Newfield, Crance; Enfield, John J. Juber; Ulysses, John E. Snedecker; Lansing, David Hardy; Groton, Benjamin J. Bucko; McLean, Herman Hodgson; Freeville, Harold Shepard: West Dryden, Mrs. James Vanderbilt; Etna, Miss Gladys Locke; Dryden Village, C. W. Sadd. Members-at-large elected for three years were Philip Bite ly, Van Houtte, Arthur Watkins and Geoffrey Weaver; for three years to succeed themselves were Agard, Roger Bardvvell, Mrs. Cosentini and Hall. Renamed for one year terms, representing the City of Ithaca, were Richard E. Hughes and Allan Treman, and for one year representing the Town of Ithaca, Wendell Earle. Walter Schwan was named to fill a vacancy for one year as a member-at-large and, for a two-year term, Gene German. Leaving the Board after serving the maximum two three-year terms are Michael R. Hanna, Irving I. Lewis and Arthur H. Peterson. Leaving the Board for business or personal reasons are Walter Rounseville, Elimer D. Robinson, Richard W. Sidenberg and Edward C. Mitchell. 4 - ( ? 114. ,t V i

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