The Ithaca Journal from Ithaca, New York on June 16, 1947 · Page 9
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The Ithaca Journal from Ithaca, New York · Page 9

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Ithaca, New York
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Monday, June 16, 1947
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Page 9
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t NINE - THE ITHACA JOURNAL, ITHACA, N.Y., MONDAY EVENING, JUNE 16, 1947 .- I State Strives To Cut School Bus Accidents Gannett News Service stiba,nySchool buses which average 49.000.000 mies annually in New York State alone, have becorne the epoons which feed our educational inetitutes. Every day that school is in Iteration 208,000 children ride to and from school in 5.160 conveyances. With- the spread of school centralization, rural areas especially have become dependent on motor vehicle transportation to carry puPils from outlying districts to the schoolroom. While the number of pupils and conveys nets has risen in New York State over a period of years. the number of accidents has gradtaSly decreased. The growing safety factor can be attributed largely to the 'Work of the bureau of field service In the State Education Department. Melt is directly responsible for regulatirg the 2,250 vehicles owned by school districts throughout the at A,,ong with statewide regulations set tip under the vehicle and traffic law and by the Public Service Commission, the bureau has established additional rules to assure greater safety to school bus passengers. Seecial attention has been given ty the bureau to the use of national school bus chrome. a yellow coloring adopted by 45 states as the universal color for school buses. Although a bill to make the use of the chrome mandatory on a statewide beets died in the Legislature last years the bureau is confident of its re-introduction and more favorable action perhaps next year. , Constantly at work on more efficient bus designs the bureau has recently approved two types of safety windows. One type is eslishsred with metal frames on the lower section of the window sealed and extended eight inches above the sill. This construction allows ventilation through the top section and at the same time prevents chil-. dren from thrusting their heads and arras through the open window. Windows Exits The windows are installed so that a quick jerk loosens the bottom section, making a 18 by 20 inch emergency exit. A second type window has glass set in a rubber moulding which without much effort could he pushed out allowing easy escape from the interior of the bus. Other improvements have been made in ventilation and lighting. There is still the problem of 'awakening" operators of motor vehicles who recklessly disregard the lives of school bus occupants. Legislation amending the motor vehicle and traffic law signed by the Governor this year which becomes effective Jan. 1, 1948, contains two important provisions. The first provision will require al buses used exclusively to transport school children to be equipped with flashing red signal lights on the front and rear of the bus. They must be placed not more than 8 inches below the top of the vehicle. The lens of each must be at least 6 inches in diameter with the word "ssop" across the face. Although the law states that the lights should be operated by the driver, the Education Department has ordered the lights to be installed so they will light automaticaliv when the bus door opens and continue to flash until the door closes. Under the second provision, the driver of.a motor vehicle approaching a school bus which has stopped to receive or discharge passengers. must halt completely until the bus resumes motion or until signaled by the driver to proceed. The need for this legislation is evident in statistics compiled by the 1.1.fotor Vehicle Bureau on school bus accidents in 1946. Of 69 accidents reported 22. or almost one-third of them, were caused by drivers who passed halted buses and i struck a child who darted in front of the bus. Carelessness on the part of drivers also was responsible for at least half of the other accidents. Five of the cases reported vehicles had plunged into the rear of the bus after the bus had stopped. Say Roads Dangerous In only one instance reported was faulty mechanism responsible for an accident. tey roads and loss of control by bus drivers accounted for the re-ma ',ming cases. State requirements for school bus drivers are lenient. Although there is no state mandatory tle&nng course. the state trained 4.500 young men during the war years. each of whom was certed for a 3-year period. This training now has ceased. but parnshlets are issued to drivers containing the "ten commandments for Fare driving." Standard qualifications for all drivers include: (11 minimum age, 21 years; (20 physical fitnessfree from physical defects that would tend to lessen ability to operate a sehicle safely; (3 licensingin rural areas either an operator's or chauffeur's license, in urban areas . chaaffeur's license; (4) charter requirementsgood moral character and thoroughly reliable. The campaign for school bus safety is by no means over. This week state and school offl America's Finest ANTHRACITE & W. 'BLUE COAL' PRICES REDUCED ORDER NOV JAMES LYNCH COAL COMPANY 843 Wct Seneca Street FlIONE 2204 Est. 1894 I Time-Buying Controls May Be Ended By JAMES MARLOW WashingtonUP)You want to buy something on time? Now the government lays down the rules on bow you do it. For example: On things like autos and refrigerators you must pay one-third of the value down and the balance within 15 months. There's a chance the controls may be removed altogether. Should they be? President Truman says no. He argues this way: Goods still are not plentiful enough to meet full demand. Even so. installment buying is increasing. And The more that kind of buying increases . with goods still not plentiful, the more the tendency for prices to rise. He wants prices kept dow n. The opposite argument comes from Representative Wolcott. Michigan Republican and chairman of the House banking committee: Controls work against those people who haven't been able to save enough money to make a fair-size down payment. For example: Now a man who wants a $1,500 auto must pay one-third down, $500, and the rest in 15 months. But a man who hasn't saved $500 still could buy a car if the down payment were smaller and the time for the balance was longer than 15 months. In 1940, before the controls, total consumer credit was .$9,153,000,000. In 1946, with the controls in effect, it was $9,958.000,000. President Roosevelt, under his wartime powers, imposed the controls in 1941 to control prices a bit. President Truman has continued them. But should such controls, with the war over two years, be continued by presidential wartime power alone? Mr. Truman thinks not, even , cials previewed in Albany a non-advertising motion picture, filmed and distributed by the,Metropolitan Equipment Corporation of Long Island and the Superior Coach Corporation of Newark. The film. "Priceless Cargo," is being circulated throughout the nation in order to arouse public interest in a safety program affecting 4,500,000 children. I I , '''--- g 7 0 rt.,' .00r-A. 0!Yi,,,,,N00410100 Tt ,-R4111. - - ARta.. - v 4 t ic. 114 '''''' ' .!' "1"; , -. , - ..., ' ';' ' 0 V, '41 ..., ' Al, .0 .' ' ,, - . . '' 1 A l k 'I - ' '' ; I.' :", '.410.3'.'"' Ck-1; , ,:l' ,t.,-,0,4 I 1 , 3 , .---; 0 d, f. !"4 et., '''',.- .4. I.' -- ' ' i'l, ;..1,---tts. 1. .! , , -. '-' A 14", Ar' L' " "z -- ,'-' :. ---;A,i...--4,401".1..) ', fi-' --'" ''---1 , - ...4' k 4 7, -',.:4-",, T'sI'";!,',': -.,--' ,.. , :",- --- ' ;-. .., i . -.-.:-$ s -at :,,- t , mk I. - !":.. 5--- ''07 - '-':,:iO4-.-!" .1",17 ' A r--''' 4.": - '- - , ' ' ' -" ..,. . .t ,---t -"-- 1 . 1 '' 'Ike.'" - 1--;?.4 .7.7-...(,1,..t.',5'',1,4"--...7!,-, --e.C.:Ter'S - ' - - ,, 4 ' I f I. ' ,;,i, 4 ...1.,k '',.' '' , ' , ; -444,"',,"S' ''',,, ""r4,,,- s grVs t'c'',- 4,;V-? f"-..- ,.- loriLot --". , , --4,-., -, - -4-, (ik. --i,,,oft,o'f! - --"--... 4, ,.,,L,,--- '!'""----- - luilimmtre,;.., Ar4J,,twIL-gii;Aap;.4 z- -...0, t 1- .. - ...411011.10VvoloV AMERICAN SCHOOL BOOKS are so precious to these Philippine farm children that they look at them even while riding the family carabao working in the fields near Cavite. Books are part of the 250,000 elementary school texts obtained through California State Department of Education and shipped to. Manila for distribution. tr r -4,i 4 -- . . - '- . a v Xd:4: ComMelicement Program Listed SpencerClosing activities of the Central School have been released by Principal John Bills. The grade operetta will be given the Friday, June 20, at the school auditorium at 8 p.m. The baccalaureate services will be held in the Federated Church Sunday, June 22, at 8 p.m. The worship service will be in charge of the Rev. Seward Bliss and the Rev. Leslie Lurvey. The Rev. Ruthven Chalmers, pastor of the Federated Church, will preach the sermon. Monday night, June 23, the seniors will hold their Class Night exercises. Tuesday, June 24, at 8 p.m., at the school auditorium the annual commencement program will be given. The speaker will be Assemblyman Leo P. Noonan, Cattaragus County. His topic will be, "Lasting Principles." On Monday night, June 23, he speaks to the graduates of Owego Free Academy and on Wednesday night, June 25, to the class in Utica Free Academy. Regents examinations will be given the week of June 16. The upper six grades will get report cards the night of commencement in their home rooms. V ,,,,, , .-.1tosiwuestba,... NEWS OF TILE Home Bureaus IC7Y----- 101-105 East State Street Ithaca, New Yin ,400 -7. ----- NokN r me -r,v4 ommmmnamompolmommooNogimmirmenloomilmognolommoseenrionmon.r Mall This Coupon for TREE Estimate ta '- -"Iir rit;-,rn. rv: i, - ,,,,,rmtp...rInimpomunoloodionnoon, N7,,,,,,mor, ,A0014.1.1 a,...i - -....1010 ,lii0101111 t..., ' -- .'--VL ' l, rti r -I 1.. . ,a,;-a.,;,:t4.4-',A1 - '-t ;.--:: ROC ViOOL IiISUL11111011 Diovi1411 by vilinDs Wards experts will insulate your home the right way! Rock-wool is blown-in under proper pressure to give the most effective year-round insulation. No muss no bother for you. Remember Wards do reliable work at low cost! Don't wait. call today for a free estimate! Insulate Now Pay Later On Wards Home Improvement Plan num 1 nu; coupon Tot rum!, rAnamate - MONTGOMERY WARD Sz, CO. I 101-105 EAST STATE STREET. ITHACA. NEW YORK I i would like a free estimate of the cost of losulatinft nty home. I i would like a free estimate of the cost of losulatinft I 1 nty home. 1. Name I Address I I I I Bostwick Road The Horne Bureau met Thursday afternoon with Mrs. Frances Bruce, with 16 members present. Papers were read on "Citizenship," by Alice Baker and Mabel Curtis. Refreshments were serve. Officers were elected for the coming year as follows: Chairman, Frances ' Bruce; vice chairman, Lida Griffin; secretary, Blanche Marshall; treasurer, Jessie Teeter. A picnic for July 13 in Upper Enfield was scheduled. though he wants them continued. This week he asked Congress to continue them by passing a law. He says that if Congress doesn't continue them by law, he'll drop the controls altogether. He told that to Wolcott's banking committee, which is considering the problem. Because of Wolcott's attitude, outlined above, his 'committee is unlikely to recommend to the full Congress that such a law be passed. So if Congress doesn't act, the President will drop the controls, even though his economic advisors Want them contlinued. Economy Plan May Close Ellis Island New YorkThe Mlle immigrant sat quietly on the ferry boat bench watching the New York skyline draw nearer through the early afternoon haze. Ilehind him was Ellis Island, gateway of alien entry to the United States for 55 years; ahead of him was a new life in America. For the black clad foreigner, this was the beginningfor Ellis Island, perhaps the end. If Ugo Carusi, United States commissioner of immigration and naturalization, has his way, New York's port of entry will be abandoned and the new immigrant will thus become one of the last of some 30,000,000 aliens I processed through Ellis Island since 1892. Under consideration now of economy minded members of the House appropriations committee in Washington is Commissioner Carusis proposal to do away with Ellis Island as center of this country's Immigration activities. His recommendations would transfer all immigration Service activities to a huge block-long building in midtown Manhattan, thus saving the federal government an estimated $300,000 a year. Island Expensive Ellis Island is expensive. Situated In New York harbor, practically under the Statue of Liberty, the Immigration station can be reached only by ferry from the mainland. The huge old-fashioned buildings, designed by Stanford White, run up a large monthly maintenance bill. On the opposite side of the ledger, those who want to keep Ellis Island In its present capacity query quietly: What is to become of the Marine Hospital that occupies a good half of the island? What outdoor facilities will be available as recreational areas to aliens who frequently must spend time at the station before being admitted or deported? Some of the area surrounding the immigration section is devoted to fenced-in outdoor yards with ball fields and benches, where immigrants and internees may keep fit and relieve the tedium of waiting. Four Years on Isle Ellis Island not only processes passengers off ships awaiting entry or clarification of status, but handles stowaways, people arrested for illegal entry or subject to expulsion. Deportation proceedings often require from two weeks to several years, depending on legal battles and available shipping. Still quartered there are some 300 German prisoners of war. Some of these internees have spent almost four years on Ellis Island. The story of Ellis Island is full of drama and comedy, woes and ecstacies, tears and laughter. In the days when the original Father Knickerbocker was bowling on the lower Manhattan greens, Dutch lads and lassies called it "Oyster Island" and used it as a picnic ground. For a while is passed under the names of Bucking Island, Gibbet's, Gull, Kiosk and Government Island, but in 1808 it acquired a permanent name when Samuel Ellis, a New Jersey farmer who owned the land, ceded it to the federal government. In 1892 it officially became the nerve center of U.S. immigration. In 1897 a disasterous fire destroyed all the buildings and records. Huge Claims raid With gleeful cry and itching fingers, all 61 immigrants who had been carried to safety immediately swore that their financial collateral was much more than the minimum amount required for entry. Total claims amounted to millions of dollars and since there was no way of disproving their testimony, Uncle Sam paid off. At present, there are 500 assorted nevi beauty for you! P914 I Literary Guidepost Three Ways to Mecca, by Edwin Code (flud', Sloan & Pearce). Every so often, but not often enough to disturb the medial complacency of the best-seller lists, a new novel revives, or at least rationalizes, some small hope that literary urbanity and wit, plus reasonably skilled writing, did not die out completely before 1947. "Three Ways to Mecca" compares most readily perhaps with the classic "Soutll Windm of Norman Douglas; and Edwin Code has doubtlessly jotted down a note somewhere already to that effect, with a twinkle in his eye. For here I immigrants and aliens under custody. Down One hall wanders a sombreroed cowboy from the pampas of Argentina, clutching a guitar and strumming softly while waiting exit from the U.S. after an Illegal entry. In another corridor a Scotch burr argues with the voice of an American guard. Groups Separated The various groups are kept separated in their respective categories, but families are not torn apart. Single men and women are lodged in huge dormitory rooms in double-decker bunks. Wherever you turn on Ellis Island, in administrative offices, dormitory rooms or corridors, there is spotless white tile running up three-quarters of the walls. The dining-room wall is one cornplete mural depicting American history from the first settlers to modern times. Artists of the WPA have painted the story of the United States in simple terms for aliens who may become citizens themselves. Say It with Flowers PRATT'S FLOWER SHOP 214 East Seneca St. Phone 3471 BY A NUM SALON CONSULTANT Bertha Pautenis All this week, in our Cosmetic Department a representative of the Richard Hudnut Salon in New York will be here to give you individual, personalized advice on skin care and the subtle art of make-up. SHE OFFERS YOU A FREE1 Stf' --------- - - MAKEUP LESSON! You'll have uninterrupted privacy phone us for a special appointment to obtain this gift of beauty from Richard Iludnut! KLII1E'S PHARMACY FRANK M. MaciNIURRAY, Prop. 114 N. Aurora St. Phone 2613 A COAST GUARDSMAN returns a blanketed five-day-old baby to its anxious father at Ottumwa, Iowa. during evacuation of families in the path of the flooded Des Moines River. An estimated 6,000 were homeless in Ottumwa. is an adult novel of capable prose wherein deft satire at times leads to the suspicion that while he is having a thoroughly enjoyable time exploring his fellow menand ladiesCorle has put himself right down in their company for analysis and probe. The book is stimulating, a rare charge against a present day novel as well as entertaining. And the copious satire is humor pleasantly barbed rather than comment bitterly sharp. The story recounts 24 hours in the home of a highly successful and smooth California novelist; midway is a lengthy return to a summer 16 years before. There is love interest, but it doesn't obtrude. What there is of plot is simply convenient framework for exposure of a delightful assortment of humanity, skillful conversation and technically polished writing. Oliver Walling (Corle's mischief makes his initials " 'oww, oww,' the letters drawn by cartoonists indicating somebody suffering in a dentist's chair") is the central figure if not hero, who early in the pages obtains a tailormade dog suit, complete with a fine hinged head, all of which he thereafter wears on an amazing variety of occasions. John Lack land (more spoofing with names) is the catalyst, the figure of youthful sophistication and amused culture later who resolves the meager machanics of plot. It is educated, humorful philosophizing about the old debbil JOHN F. GEHERIN INSURANCE PHONE 2641L--204 E. STATE STt 324 - 328 W. STATE STREET, ITHACA question "why is man?", capably handled so that it never becomes dogmatic, dull of self-centered. The chief agency of narrative is conversation, a tricky method for many authors, which is ably handled even when reporting the chatter of a couple of fortunately tollerable children who to serve Corte's delighted purposes. His previous works have been greeted with respect and enthusiasm; "Three Ways to Mecca" adds merit to such appreciation and anticipation. WILLIAM CLOVER ct, Around the Corner A , C:64 4. oft. Mftit :;) oft. tt co) ' S ,, That's what my husband calls me, when I tell him how much I save at Acme! 4P SEEING IS BELIEVING GET TO KNOW THE ADVANTAGES OF SHOPPING AT 1 S 105 Soulh Aurora Street "Just around the corner from State" FRESH GROUI1D BEEF Lb. 39c JUICY UNLESS FRAMS Lb. 39c IIENTIO-111.1 MIMS Sr Ln:al:ted Lb 39C ElOIT'S LISSOnTED JELLIES BOSOM COFFEE Regular or litIOX AISSORTED JELLS SOUTIIER11 CUCUMBERS LARGE MIX OWNS UT MITE CREW STUB AGAIN, and AGAIN AGAIN 11 Cool Crisp SOMME SLICED MO TOASTED COCOANUT BUB "' "' "' "' "' LIOLLS "' Poland Gets U.S. Cars Gdynia, Poland The Danish steamer Gudrun unloaded 63 American-made automobiles hers for distribution to government ministries and agencies. k , the real success of any business lies not in t1;e newt customers it attracts but in the customers who come back again and again. jilrs have established quite a reputation in that, so many women who bought here come back again and again. Mrs insistence on the better fashions at ow- i er prices s why so many women like to shop around the corner. Right now we have a selected group of summer fashions you'll like come in fy,f 1 (.0 LO. '141,0110apilaie'C Ptf ridg67L1';,'"(B 141; "4, Large Loaf t.:;. A , 10 Oz. Jar 7 - , lb. can rkg. , Each flu mit -;sr I 190 46c Ic ch 5c Lb 1 CC "12 15C I 12c rkg 34c 14c IT'S - FUR ST 1115 RAGE TIME NOW! Bring Your Fur Coats Here Now For CLEANING GLAZING REPAIRING Featad Vfillegfteatt ITHACA'S ONLY FURRIER 31S East State Street Tel. 229S , z ty 4. -) I ,k Ir , , r er, ,,,--, 42,4; A05E11 , AMS. A.W.,-,70 .09; All1.1.11.11111111 7. ,AINEEMS111.1111111 , se I o , r "." o o000.o , .000, lt:zsalk .-Ak.OPyLdralki. 11.41.11d111.fro04. "."11 , , t. , ' - ' ,(--- i , - - 1 - vArt, 1 ...., ,,rr , , , , , -- - , -0-?, 4, , , 1 ,1 .. 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