The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on December 11, 1940 · Page 9
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 9

Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Wednesday, December 11, 1940
Page 9
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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1040 BLYTHEVILLE (ARK) COURIER NEWS PAGE NIN1 'GET HIS GUI 1 IN Divisions Carrying Fewer Rifles' But More Rifle Power liy \V I I.U S . T HORN T O N NEA Service Staff CorrcsiJondent SAN ANTONIO, Tex., Dec. 11.— If you think that when Johnny goes into the army thai means simply .shouldering a gun and marching away, you've got another think coming. He may go into the infantry and never hold, a rifle. He mny go inlo the cavalry and never get on a horse. He jnny go into the field artillery, and never serve a field gun, or he may even become an army pilot and .never ; fly a fighting plane. For instance,' the Second Division at Fort S&m Houston is one of the army's y.rize divisions, one of the few kept intact and continuous since the World War. Yet of its 12,000 men, fewer than 30 per cent are riflemen—in World War days it would have been GO per ctnt or moi-'e. The specialized and auxiliary services grow lurgw as army orjjanS/hlion urows more complicated. YP: this division, completely equipped with the Garand rifle, projduco.s more fire power than ever, i It sounds odd ilo talk of a machine shop in the: cavalry, yet the First Cavalry division at- F6it They Curry No Horses WEDNESDAY - THURSDAY CLAUDETTE RAY ' COLBERT MILLAND 03) MAIN OCCUPATION. JUST WHAT DID YOU DO? Para mount News & Comedy Phone Ritz 224 Phone Roxy 322 LISTEN TO KLCN 10:00 a.m.—12:45 p.m.—4:30 p.m. ROXY LAST TIMES TODAY BARGAIN NIGHTS lOc & 20c ftIso selected Shorts THUR. & FRI. BARGAIN NIGHTS 10c & 20c roio IN TERROR; (H FMPIOYFR (civu fit 1 ADDRESS OP FMPIOYPR _ r , __ DEPT. SHOP op nr^iNrw ' SECOND BEST O<~<-iipATinw JUST WHAT DID •YOU P n ? - - - (« ' THIRD BEST O<~<~UPATi^N . , ._. ^ JUST WHAT DID YOU f>f> 7 V'*V RATINGS V.' */"\y CL»SSIFIC SPEC. SER. No. SCORE TYPE - DATE 1 2 I 2 (191-fo \ l ' ^ HIGHEST POSITION OR I FADFRC1HIP . - __ (20)-(y ADD | T |ONAL OCCUPATIONS HOBBIES, ETC. OTHFB (21) FAVORITE SPORTS" T s-^ SCHOOL OR TEAM EXCELLS ~J ' . • L : B XL train n replacement for every noncommissioned officer. As new units form, and they requisition from old ones the needed sergeants nnd corporals, they'll get them, -and the understudies will get their ehov- ron.s immediately. This at least doubles all former opportunities I'or promotion. hi ihc rapidly forming army. which will total 29 divisions by early summer, the roar-rank private with no specialised duly or ability of any kind Is actually tfo- inu to bo in the minority. Father Names Son For Hero Of 1916 Rescue Jumped out of his sent. His hand came down on the whistle cord. Emergency brakes screamed. Stokes had seen a baby crawling on the tracks—a short distance ahead. "It's no use, I can't slop. her. in lime." Stokes showed to Pi reman Joseph l-\ MottweiU'r, of Memphis. MoUweiler opened the engine window. Ho climbed through it hurriedly and raced along the catwalk at the .side of Die boiler. Hi. 1 leaped oil' the strp a I the side of the cowcatcher mul ran ,ihe;ui. He snatched the child from i.he tracks a.s the train .slid by: That baby—'.!'•.. ymu.s ol.l then —was Jesse l.oller. Lollor hus numed his fir-i nan Mott, In honor to (.ho Ji MRMPH1S, 'IVnn. iUP) -- Many are the apocryphal 1 ;; about railroad men, but Jesse Loller— who owes hi:; life, to a fust-lhink- inu fireman—tells a story that will compel*; for Interest with any of thciii. U. w:\s a hot June day in HI 1(1. FlNl.liVVJLLL-:. »>ti. <UP) An A freight train with i)0 heavily Indian ".suurillcu rock." pocked with loaded boxcars was pulling inU)| holes apparently used a;; containers the outskirts of Lucy. Tenn. for blood, has ben discovered near Suddenly ttnuineer J. \V. .Stokes Saltsburu', alonu the Kislmlnetas Indian "Sacrifice Rock" Found in Pennsylvania river, by Chief George S, Fisher, of Union Valley, member of the Pennsylvania Indian Research. Chief Fisher said the rock measured 8 feet across by 12 inches in thickness and has ',(, uolcs, each of. them capable of holding about a (|iiurl of blood. He reported ulso finding in the same vicinity a huge mortar weighing about CO pounds 'The Pennsylvania Indian Research has planned u pilgrimage (o i.ho site of the find,' and will take a cast, of the rock. MONTCIOMKRY. Ala.' (.UP) — Alabama polliiRm was the lowest in IM!) oi' the past decade. The state health department reports- only UM cases last year a;; n lu'Kh of l.l'.'O cases in 1931. — PRESCRIPTIONS^ Safe - . Accurate Tour Prescription Druggtai Fowler Drug Co. ***** H* V«j MEW YEAR'S EVE DANCE Owen Z'uck and His ORCHESTRA Sponsored by the Blytheville Bachelor Club City Hall Dr. Saliba's Clinic EYE, EAR, NOSE and THROAT 128 I'), Kentucky Avc., Corner Franklin & Kentucky GLASSES FITTED .1. /I. Snlllm, M.D., M.E., Ph.G. Of fee Phone 418, Res. These young n\en enlisrecl In the cnvrury. bin they curry no horses Thl\v are purl of n field hospital unit attached lo the mounted vvoops It's fine practice for long-range ombiny flights, but nt, present it ^ jusL about like i\ commercial ill-line pilot's work. HOUSEKEEPING" "OKCE FORMING Specialization is to go still fur- her. Now in course of organization a Corps Area .Service Command vhich will be separate from the iclcl forces. This force will take charge of the "housekeeping" phase if the running of any large camp. Thus when an organized• division or field force leaves such a camp, t will not leave it disorganized: he permanent corps service troops will remain, and the running of the camp as an institution will not Victor McLAGLEN .. Directed by HAROLD SCHUSTER Anocfau Producer: MARSHAU GRANT A NEW UNIVERSAL PICTURE Also Selected Shorts What you have done, what you can do is likely to deter- mipe.^'hat will ;;do_in the. "new army. Here's part of the Qualification Card that will be filled out by every selectee. When rim through a machine the cards of those with any given special talent or ability are thrown out, enabling assignment to specialized forces. , and without delay another iiew recruit has found his non-rme- carrying niche. There are corps regiments trained to b'uild and' repair landing fields, medical outfits, all kinds of telephone, telegraph and radio signal" men; cooks and bakers (all taught uniform and efficient procedure special schools); to say nothing of all the mechanics, repairmen and drivers required by widespread' motorization. Promotion is rapid. For th'ose who volunteered a few months'ago it is already coming fast. At Fort Sam Houston the other day, five men were made sergeants who were still' drawing the $21 be disrupted by either departure whioh . tnark ^: L he man who 'has cr arrival of field troops. This is also a buon to commanders of field troops, who formerly when taking the field for practice exercises always had to leave large detachments behind in camp to maintain services. . A permanent corps "housekeeping" • command, such as is now^ planned, will also be able to : em^ ploy ' "large • numbers of-~ civilians- and even NYA youths, since the organization will not be subject to field service. Further, a man is much more likely to slip right into these specialized niches today than formerly. At the Reception Center served less'than four 'months. It's that way all along the. line in expanding force, including officers, where new general's s^ars blossofn daily. Every command down company Is now ' under, orders i to H APPY GRO.& DKLIVE&iT Nt W. Main &L, Phonr U immediately after induction, he is Bliss has a completely equipped ! quizzed for 40 .minutes by a motorized machine shop to attend j trained vocational man who ap- that now the motorized units support all cavalry. . At least 40 army aviators who trained as combat pilots are flying- scheduled transport hops with freight in the elaborate transport plies tests on vocational experience and aptitude similar to those used by state and federal employment "bureaus. If a field organization then wants a man trained in bookkeep- by which the army de- ', ing or speaking Spanish, it- can get livers its own airplane supplies, him from the Reception Center. DliNDtD C 1OTTUD BY THI CALV»RT OISTILUN3 CO. (AIT! MORI, K3. mat Calvert DANCE EVERY SAT. N*GHT : BLUE ROOM HOTEL NOBLE BONNIE-BUTTER STEAK SANDWICHES SERVED L/ON'T get me wrong. I wasn't bora with any gold spoons in my mouth. My pop is just an ordinary hard-working fellow and lie and mom don't live fancy. But they're happy. The other night mom was showing pop my new electric bottle warmer, and he said we're lucky to have sucb handy electric things, and to be able to buy them. That got him started talking about his job and he said American workingmen are much better orV than workingmen in other countries. He said a big reason is because American factories use so much more electric power and that means men like my pop can turn out more work and therefore make more money for his boss, Mr. Hardy, and more for himself, too. And Mr. Hardy can sell his products cheaper, so more people can buy them and that helps everybody. That's why people like my pop and mom are really rich. Because they're rich in the things that make life more enjoyable. Pop said just think mom a business man like Mr. Hardy has to invest about fifteen or twenty thousand dollars for every man lie has working for him. Golly. But it's men who are willing to take risks like that who keep our wheels turning around, pop said. About that time I had a headache from trying to'figure out pop's big words so I went to sleep. But the last thing I heard him say was that for every workingman in the United States,, there is four and a half horsepower of electric power. That made me smile, because who ever heard of half a horse. BLENDED WHISKEY Culvert "Reserve": 86.8 proof-65% Grain Neutral Spiriis.-.Calvert "Special": 90 Proof—72i/ 2 % Grain Neutral Spirits. Calvert Distillers Corporation, New York City.

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