Palladium-Item from Richmond, Indiana on August 31, 1997 · Page 1
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Palladium-Item from Richmond, Indiana · Page 1

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Richmond, Indiana
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Sunday, August 31, 1997
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Page 1
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.. I I" '7 W ' ' , .p,. .1 ,i..i , te ; Coming Monday , ;!.. f Y i i The Palladium-Item starts a five-day series j V V - on renovations on Main Street I . ; , : I. . . -.,. ,.vi v.tw -.-u.:, Hound Fever Storms Today: Storms expected; About 9,000 stop by Ife for Coon Dog Snow high near 80. Four-day forecast Page A2 Local, Page A3 11 item More than 48,000 Sunday readers SUNDAY, AUG. 31, 1997 Richmond, Indiana $1.50 cents ,' (MJI; .-. Princess Diana, 1961-1997 SGI) to fenw (5. Princess, 2 others killed as photographers chase car i V, 4$ . j 2" v' - r j Hi 1 " Associated Press Police take away the car in which Diana, Princess of Wales, suffered fatal injures in the crash. Her boyfriend Dodi Fayed and the chauffeur also died in the crash that happened shortly after midnight on Sunday in a tunnel along the Seine River. Shock sets in locally as news spreads PARIS (AP) Britain's Princess Diana, who had been struggling to build a new public and private life after her turbulent divorce, was killed Sunday along with her companion, Dodi Fayed, in a car crash as their Mercedes was being pursued by photographers. The 36-year-old princess died at 4 a.m. after going into cardiac arrest, doctors told a hospital news conference. The crash happened shortly after midnight in a tunnel along the Seine River at the Pont de l'Alma bridge, less than a half mile north of the Eiffel Tower in central Paris. It came as paparazzi the commercial photographers who constantly tail Diana followed her car, police said. The death was announced at a 6 a.m. hospital news conference by Dr. Bruno Riou, an anesthesiologist. Diana and Prince Charles, heir to the British throne, separated in 1992 after 11 years of marriage and divorced last year. It was not immediately known if their two sons, Prince William, 15, and Prince Harry, 12, had been informed of her death. President Clinton said early Sunday he was "profoundly saddened" by the death of Princess Diana's death. Deputy White House press secretary Joe Lockhart, with the vacationing president on Martha's Vine-. yard, said he spoke with Clinton, who gave him this statement: , "Hillary and I knew Princess Diana, and we were very fond of Us pil ! From her fairy-tale wedding to her . bitter divorce and fallout with the royal family, Princess Diana had been an icon around the world. What are your memories of the ' Princess? The Palladium-Item will , print your responses on a special ': People page Tuesday. Call us at (765) 973-4444 or (800) ; 686-1330, ext. 4444. Fax your comments to (765) 973-4570, or f e-mail your comments to i palitemrichmond.gannett. ; com. Please leave your name and telephone number for verification. 0 Royal family reacts B Press under fire PageA2 her. We are profoundly saddened by this tragic event." Clinton said his thought and that of his wife were with Diana's family, friends "and especially her children." "The death of the Princess of Wales fills us all with shock and deep grief," said British ambassador Michael Jay, who was at the hospital. Diana's death from cardiac arrest came after she suffered heavy internal bleeding in the early-morning accident. French radio said the Please see Diana, Page A2 By DON FASNACHT Staff writer Word of Princess Diana's death had just begun to ripple through the ranks of local and regional fans of British royalty late Saturday night. And once the shock wore off, the sadness set in. "You're kidding," said Sharon Griminger, an assistant manager at Smiley's Tavern, when she was first told of the death. The raucous crowd at Smiley's had prevented her from hearing the news when it happened. Once she was convinced it wasn't a joke, she said, clearly shaken: "You're not kidding. That's very sad." The 36-year-old princess died after going into cardiac arrest from internal injuries suffered when the Mercedes she was in crashed while being pursued by photographers. Carolyn Berchtold, of Engle-wood, Ohio, was one of millions across the country who followed Princess Di. "It (news of Di's death) left me with a feeling of real sadness," Berchtold said. "She never had any peace." Berchtold cited a recent magazine interview with Princess Di in which she talked about the constant harassment by aggressive photographers. "It's like her worst nightmare came true," Berchtold said. "I feel sorry for the boys. She was a young mother, no matter what else she was." Karen Thatcher learned about the accident from her boyfriend when he picked her up after an eve ning of work at Red Lobster Restaurant. "It's awful," Thatcher said, even though she doesn't claim to be a follower of Britain's nobility saga. "It's sad," Ann Cottongim said when she learned the news. "It's really sad." Berchtold believes Princess Di will leave a lasting legacy. "I think she was a Jackie Onassis type," Berchtold said. "She had a lot of heart. Her death is tragic." -'T L L'J"'1--1-1 r t 8. iii. , Associated Press Prince Charles and Princess Diana stand on the balcony of Buckingham Palace on their wedding day, July 29, 1981. "The world has lost a princess who is simply irreplaceable. " Mohamed ai Fayed, father of Dodi Fayed Indiana employment strong, but wages poor r By MONICA M.SCHULTZ Staff writer Sherry Robbins would like to have had a three-day weekend on this Labor Day holiday something she likely would have had if she still worked in a factory. Instead, she will spend part of the weekend working as assistant manager of ShoeBiz, watching the transformation of customers' footwear from dirty and disheveled to new and immaculate. "I've worked at both," Robbins said. "The factory johs are like the same old thing over and over again. Even though I sell shoes every day, I have different clients every day. I would much rather take less pay and work in retail than work in a factory." Robbins, apparently, isn't the only one who feels that way. According to the 1997 Labor Day Report Card on Workers' Rights released today, the retail and service sectors has created 41 times as many jobs as the .. ' f i 'y ; - :r j 1 " a - Palladium-Item- STEVE KOGER Sherry Robbins, assistant manager of Shoe Biz, 3400 East Main St., helps 5-year-old Andrew Corded find just the right pair of shoes on Friday afternoon. manufacturing sector from 1990 to 1995. The report, published by the Calumet Project in Hammond, Ind., said Wayne County has created more below-average paying jobs like the ones in retail than above-average paying jobs like the ones in factories. And the trend is expected to continue something Robbins doesn't find surprising. "I don't think you're going to lose your factory workers," she said. "There's just a different type of clientele that works in a factory. But in retail, especially with Please see Labor, Page A2 State gets a B in economy, but rates D in wages SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) While thousands of jobs are being created in Indiana each year, the bulk of those are paying below-average or poverty-level wages, according to a study released today. The state got a B in employment and the economy, but a D in wages in the 1997 Report Card on Workers Rights in Indiana. The study was done by The Calumet Project, a Hammond-based, nonprofit organization that studies economic development issues. "The large number of workers at low-wage jobs is startling, stunning considering the overall economy is doing well," said Steven Ashby, di- IHow Wayne County fared in the study Page A2 rector of the Calumet Project. "There's a stark contrast in terms of how well workers are doing in take-home pay and how well the economy is doing." Indiana has one of the strongest economies in the country, the report said. The state had the ninth-lowest poverty rate in the nation in 1995, unemployment has been dropping steadily since 1992, and construction and exports are up. From 1990-95, there were 277,000 jobs created, with 34 counties creating 4,000 new jobs or more. But while state officials tout successes like Toyota's plant near Princeton, which will create 1,000 jobs, or Heartland Steel's new plant in Vigo County that will create about 175 jobs paying an average $45,000, the report said such projects are the exception, not the rule. Of the state's net job growth from 1990-95, 20 percent was in poverty-level wage jobs that pay less than $15,150 a year. And of the jobs created in the state's 20 largest Please see Study, Page A2 the Palladium-Item ir( h Abby. E6 Movies B10 Business D1 Nation A8 Calendar. A4 People E1 Classified .C1 Record A5 Editorial A6 Region A4 Local A3 Sports B1 Lottery. A5 World Obituaries, Page A5 Blevins, Jay Christensen, Alan Day, Cecil Douthitt, Joseph 0901,l04410l For home delivery of the Palladium-Item call (765) 962-1450 or (800)686-1330

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