Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado on June 2, 1970 · Page 19
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Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado · Page 19

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Tuesday, June 2, 1970
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'ues., June 2, 1970 GREELEY TRIBUNE PageJ9 Current Wild Bill Elliott Seeks High Jump Mark LIDLIFTERS OPPONENTS - Members of the Gibson's ·«nd Rocky Mountain News baseball teams lined up along 'the foul lines during introductions at Monday's opening of the 1970 Grcelcy Babe Ruth League season for boys 13-15 years old. Two games were played at Butch Butler Municipal Field. Gibson's beat Rocky Mountain News, 8-7, and Weld County Lumber defeated the Greeley Producers, 9-3. (Tribune photos) loop Presidents To Testify In Curt Flood Baseball Suit ,NEW YORK (AP) - The presidents of the National and American leagues were expected to take the stand today in the controversial Curt Flood baseball suit. Chub Feeney, the National witness in day-lcng proceedings Monday. American . League President Joe Cronin and Bing Devine, general manager of the St. Louis Cardinals, waited in the wings. Feeney, who continues his tes- League president, was the onlyUimony today, agreed Monday "it would be fair" to relax some rules of baseball's reserve clause. He said he would favor a change in the reserve clause, directed at the reserve clause, charging it is a form of slavery which binds a player to a team for life without individual re- letting a player become a free I course. agent at the age of 55. Flood's suit against baseball and the major league owners is The Boloney A Tribute Jo Fine Job By Paul Moloney Babe Ruth baseball for boys 13-15 years old made its season's debut Monday. American Legion A and B action will begin this weekend. And Little League action for those younger will be played at the Little League Park at Evans this summer. More than 500 games will be played in the area, and this is a dream come true for Pete D'Amato, who got kids' baseball going iii Greeley in 1949. ' D'Amato has retired from coaching, but he's still deeply involved in the kids' game. He directs the Greeley American Legion- Elks program and can be seen at many of the games. It it wily fitting the park at Evans b. named, "D'Amato Little Le.gue Field." * * * . Heart warming incident: " ' A man lost his billfold with 130 cash and numerous credit cards at Monday's opening of the Babe Ruth League season at Butch Butler' Municipal Field. A youngster found the wallet and turned It in to the gate keeper at the park. The lid was rewarded with $5 for his integrity. * * * Al laser's victory in the Indianapolis "500" was a treat for his followers from the Kocky Mountain region. The Pikes Peak Hill climb and the "Indy 150" race at Continental Divide Raceways should be top- drawers. * * * To review: Greeley West gridder Randy Geist has enrolled at Colorado University and teammate Kim McKinley will go to the University of Nebraska. Greeley Central Lefthand Pitcher Bob Kelly will enter Colorado University in the fall, while Righthander Dave Jones'is headed to Pomona College in California. Central All-America eager Henry Thompson will enter Denver University. University 1 ! All-America swimmer Bill Helsi Jr. has settled on the University ef Indiana for his collegiate schooling. Central's Randy St. Aubyn plans to play football at Colorado State University. Still undecided are Central All-America Wrestler Pat Kaveny and West record- setting hurdler Doug Max. * * * Kaveny received word Monday he will be the 123-pound representative for the U.S. Junior Wrestling Federation at the Mexico National Wrestling championships July 8-15 at Mexico City. t * « Ed C. Johnson died over the weekend. He was 86 and one of the most -- if not the most respected men in Colorado political history. He left an outstanding sports legacy, too. * * * Tom Severtson, University of Northern Colorado third baseman, finished 10th in the nation among NCAA University Division baseball players in runs batted in. Severtson hit 31 for a 1.24 average a game. Dick Smithwick of the Air Force Academy hit 53 and ranked second with 1.64 RBIs a game. -A- * * Dick Ziegler, Western State third baseman from Greeley, wound up 16th in the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference in hitting with a .342 batting mark. He collected 26 hits in 76 times to bat and drove in 14 runs, second best on the team. Lefthander Gary Gettman produced a 2-4 won-lost record for the Mountaineers and was third in innings pitched. WSC had an 8-14 season under Coach Don Meyer, former 1'NC baseball standout. · * · · * · * Jim Ziegler. Dick's older brother, is hitting .300 fnr Visalia in Ihe Class A California League. This is his third season in professional baseball. He's an outfielder. Another pro, Greg Riddoch had a 14- game hitting string broken Wednesday. During the stretch he boosted his batting mark to .280. He's playing third base for Asheville, S. C., in the Class AA Southern Assn. Ron Herbel, who pitched for Colorado Stale College in the early 1960's. has become San Diego's No. 1 righthand relief pitcher. Flood, an all-star outfielder for the Cardinals for many years, brought his suit after he was swapped to the Philadelphia Phillies during the off-season. Cross-examined by one of Flood's lawyers, Jay Topkis Feeney was first asked if he would favor a change in the rules that made a man a free ugenl-a change the owners have steadfastly refused to grant. "Yes," he retorted. "How about 55 years of age," Topkis asked, trying to get something on the record. "That would be fair," Feeney said. But Feeney also reiterated the stand of owners--that Ihe reserve clause should not be abol-| ished because it was necessary! to baseball. Feeney said farm clubs! "would be (he first to go under" if the clause was eliminated be cause wealthy teams would have all the advantages in the more costly would follow. By DAN BERGER stociated Press Sports Writer LOS ANGELES (AP) - Menon Bill Elliott and Mom says, He was great," son chimes in 'ith "He's terrific," and the eneration gap runs into more roblems. Mom meant Wild Bill, 1950 owboy movie actor. Son meant Bill Elliott, the Texas high umper who could be the best in he nation right now and a top :ontender for world honors. The 23-year-old, 6-foot-l jumper couldn't even be considerec mything more than a member if the Texas squad a year ago CSL Results Monday Garnsey-Wheeler 28, Weld County Bank 11. Herman Hoff xled four hits and scored five runs. Vidal Flores scored four runs and got three hits, while )ale Dilka, Jack Elsea and Doyle McCarthy homered for Garnsey-Wheeler. Del Stolte lomered and singled for Weld County Bank. Green Thumb 18, Monfort Packing 13. Green Thumb scored eight runs in the sixth nning with home runs by Larry Stair and Al Rudd the key hits. Rudd went 4-for-4. Claude? Auch also homered for Green Thumb. |Buzz Allison, Jim Repps and Mike Chacon collected three hits each for Monfort Packing. The Faucet 10, Christian I had only cleared 6-2 in the high jump," he drawls. "So one day in practice I was just clowning around and I went over the bar backwards." The style, known as the Fosbury Flop, was named for former Oregon State jumper Dick Fosbury who set the American record two years ago by winning the Olympic gold medal at 7-4 Vt. "I asked my coach about it," Elliott said, "and he said he didn't care if I took off on iny hands because my best height was 6-2." In his first meet with the new method, he leaped 6-6 and last year as a senior went 6-10. "You have to be faster with the flop method of high jumping if you want to be good. Since the style came so naturally to me, I had to develop my speed jecause I'm no streak of lightning," Elliott says. A fast approach and a hard- driving takeoff are the keys to the OFFICIAL OPENING - John R. P. Wheeler fires the .... first pitch of the 1970 Greeley Babe Ruth League baseball season to Catcher Fred Werner. The two officials signaled the opening of the season at ceremonies Monday at Butch Butler Municipal Field. the flop and he "has better technique, better speed and power than Fosbury," says Elliott's coach, Tom Jnnings. The method does one thing, though. "It makes you try hard on each jump because if you get lazy or careless, you knock the bar down and then you land on it with your shoulder and your back. And that hurts," says Elliott. He went all the way up to 7-3U last week at the California Relays at Modesto and that's the "best effort in the world Golf Notes since Fosbury's American Reformed 0. Bernie Behrmanlmark. Reynaldo Brown of the shut out Christian Reformed onl California Track Club also did three hils. Frank Martin with|7-3'i and the two resume their a home run and single, Gary'duel Saturday night at the Hughes with a triple and two(Comp!on Invitational here, singles, Mike Whiting with a Wild Bill Elliott, the drawling triple and double and Ross flopper, may be America's next Strole with two singles paced challenger lo the world mark the Faucet. |of 7-5^4 by Russia's Valery Bru- IOF 15, Monfort of Colorado mel. Tee-off times Thursday for the Highland Hills Women's ^olf Association Tournament: ; (Monthly, putting; weekly, 8 a.m. J. Reid and E. Weils, T. Allely and T. King. 8:07 a.m. Brown IOF pitcher Roger Young allowed four hits. Roger Repps! _ L J ' I I homered and double, and Rick|UQVe n i l ! wou o o w . loncest drive) i 8-14 a.m. C. Hummel Describing his dealings with lon sest anve). » « · · players as a general manager, From No. 1 hole (18-Hole 1st Smith, J. Sumnei . Feeney said, "Contract negotia-Flight): a - 2 l ' a m E Nottinah ,. ,,,,,,! TUn nlnh n ,, ... TIT T\T~..,,,nl1 T ^o,.,r °-' il « - 1 1 J - - LJ - iwlullfoll Roth smacked a home run for] and T. IOF. Darrell Benson got threej Sfeele, R. Hayes and G. Wall/jhits^ Chuck Grams Doubled and lions very real. The club 9 a.m., M. Maxwell, J. Cary, needs the player as much as the D. Montgomery, player needs the cluo." j 9:08 a m ^ B Koenig, Resig, C. Childers. 'a.m"'c."Hummei and B. [singled, and Young aided and H.'own cause with two singles. Classic Lanes 16, Brumley u ^ ».... ~. Nottingham andjFloor Covering 1. Bob Winter D. Verlinden, S. Blake and N. hurled a 3-hitter for Classic N. Cloverleaf Monday 1, Terryn Crycles 14740, R.flfl. ..20; Tango Tina 8.00, 4.00; Bruce Smith 2.IK). Quiniela (1-3) 33.00 Time 32.08 From No. 3 hole (18-Hole 2nd : Flight): ! 9 a.m., T. Adamson, M. lAaron, E. Myers. !):08 a.m. V. Pettibone, S. Linden. June monthly tournament: Best-ball (2-man team) stroke L a n e s . Larry Hergenredcr scored four times and collected three hits, while Darryl Bunting Ach In Earnings NEW YORK (AP) - Dave Hill, last year's runner-up, climbed into the Top 10 money list Monday of the PGA Tournament Plavers Division. nCOL-uail \ i . - l l i a n L L O I I I J o i i u i i v . - / , , · , plav in flights - Total of bestjpoled a home run and triple. r, - _ _..i _ f r VilUao Tnn 1f TTKT, 0. three scores out of four. June 7 weekly tournament: Odd Even. Harvey, P. Kincheloe. From No. 12 hole (9-Hole 1st 2 B's Charlie W. 15.60, 8.20, Flight): ,20- Ollie Brown 4.80, 3.00;! 9 a.m., A. Bauman, E. Can- Kincher340 Quiniela (2-5) 29.80Jnon, H. McMurry. Time 31 8 4 | 9:08 a.m., L. Howe, M. Bates, Daily Double (1-2) 134.20 B. Miller. 3 Loveland Warrior 10.20, 9:16 a.m., ,S. f-arr, B. Scn- 5.00, 3.20; Grand Firebo 4.80, mint, T. Bechloldt. PHOENIX -- Scott Hasly, 8- Geiger 6.40. Quiniela (3-8) i From No. 10 Hole (9-Hole 2nd 27.80 Time 40.01 iFlight): 4, Canda 5.00, 3.20. 2.40;j 9 a.m., L. Frazier, G. Olden- Cauturcd 7.60, 4.60; Tomar's burg, R. Dawcs. I Yuma 5.00. Quiniela (1-4) 23.40 9:08 a.m., L. Tobin, J. Tryner, . __ Time 31 93 N - Beecham. Hasty, over the weekend placcdland single. I 5 Talya 2160 600, 4.00;! 9:16 a.m., J. McKee, H.:jn three events in the 13th! Isiio'rtv's '»oc 3.40, 2.60, G.M.'s'Dooley, J. Emery. janmial Saguaro Invitational! Scott Hasty Places in Area Meet Hill, winner of the coveted Vardon Trophy in l!)69, captured Village Inn 15, ITEL '0. Bob the Danny Thomas-Memphis Darrel pitched a 4-hitter f o r ' Open title over the weekend to Village Inn Carl Schmid led the collect $30,000 and go from 23rd offense with a triple and two!TM the money list to ninth with singles. Randy Foose homeredja «tal of 6/,a80. and Chuck Benton collected a: Lee Truevino held h ' s TMf! e 7 triple and single for Village Inn!lead with $108,119 earned this Paul's Place 20, Scott Really year. Gary Player was second 0. Scott Realty got two hits in with 588,078, Dick Lotz third Ihe fourth inning off Bill Bragg.'"'ith S75.951, Billy Casper fourth Paul's Place got 22 hits w i t h . w i t h SC9,483 and Miller Barber Jamie Willhite getitng fourTM!! with 568,919. - Rounding out the lop 10 were Bob Lunn. with $68,299; Frank doubles in He scored five times at bat. four runs. Charlie Carlson tripled and doubled, while Tom Sitzman got a double and two singles. 'Bill Beckwith Beard, $68,245; Homero Blancas, $67,711; Dave Hill, $67,580 and Jack Niclkaus, $66,283. year-old'son of former Eaton'hil a pair n! triples, and Jene; Hi " also advanced from 14th "(Colo.) High School coach JimjStencil garnered a triple, doubleilasl week to seventh in the point ' ° .. . , . i . . °. « n ,.« ,.,:iu ,, 4.(.ii nf inc n T^mntc- Altitude Controversy Returns to Mexico City jdose Call 4.20. Quiniela (3-4) 126.00 Time 40.23 6. Troy King 20.60, 7.00, 4.40; Belle Dawson 3.40, 3.00; L.B.'s Denver 4.00. Quiniela (1-2) 22.80 Time 31.54 7, Desolate 8.60, 3.60, 3.20; Hy Drift 5.00, 3.60; Charlie Jonees 5.60. Quiniela (4-5) 21.20 Time 31.67 Canadian Thistle 16.00, 8.00, 4.60; Frosting Face 9.60, 6.80; Or Windy 3.80. Quiniela (7-8) 53.60 Time 39.84 9. Fast Felix 16.20, 12.00, 5.80; Mystic Debbie 11.20, 5.00; DeWitt's Bang 3.80. Qinielu (7-| Winners May 28, Merry MixUp: B. Schmidt, J. McKee. Greeley Country Club's Saturday mixed best ball leaders: Allen and Rosemary Hayes 5. Howard and Faye Lair 65 and Chuck and Peg Rymes 67. Sunday's foursome best ball winners were: R o s s Adamson, Harry swimming championships here. | Hasty placed third in (he 50- meter breasts! roke in 50.3 seconds. He was sixth in the backstroke in 47.4 seconds and eighth in the 50-meter freestyle in 39.8 seconds. Hasty's times converted to 50 yards are the best in Colorado this year for his age group. His Casper Drops Out of Kemper Golf Tourney backstroke time Brunner. Harry Claus and_Joe seconds and the Wickland 57; Joe Gusick, Marich, Jim Marlin and Anderson 58. By CHARLES GREEN Associated Press Sports Writer MEXICO CITY (AP) - Soccer's 1970 world championship in Mexico has renewed the old altitude controversy, a controversy Mexicans thought was put to permanent rest after the 1968 Olympic Games. But the altitude-all the games will be played more than a mile in the sky-does cause problems, does cause controversy and does provide a conven : lent excuse for a loser. Dr. Roger Bannister, a retired British miler, predicted before the games cf the 19th Olympics in Mexico City in 1968 that this city's 7,347-foot allitude could possibly kill some distance runners and would definitely be an obstacle to record performances. Yet the athletes in Ihe games bettered 96 world records and 483 Olympic records. -The totals in Tokyo four years previous were only 42 and 354. And then all went home alive. The 16 nations which are com peting in the final rounds of Iht tournament for spart's mos prestigious trophy, the Jules Hi mtt Cup, are divided into foir groups. The groups play at: Mexico cily-7,347 feet abovi sea level. Gii(idalajara-S.500 feet. Leon--S,50fl fee.. ToIuca-8,300 feet. . Puebla-7,000 fool. ietween Puebla and Toluca. I 1 ' 0 "Bannister, not convinced by he reams of reports made by randreds of doctors after thousands of tests before and during he Olympics, has again predicted trouble with the altitude and again criticized soccer officials 'or selecting Mexico for such an .mportant event. | Some of the coaches agreed with him but they point out the altitude will affect everyone, not 18) 90.00 Time 31.22 n that group alternating games.a game than during competi-j 10, Money Stone Greeley Country Club the 18- hole Women's Golf Association 18 60 was 43.2 breaststroke was 45.7 seconds. Jim Hnsty reports that age group swimming begins at four years old in Arizona. Jim Hasty b e g i n s a new coaching CHARLOTTE, N.C. fAP) Thirty - one golfers qualified Monday for the $150,000 Kem- , 4.00; Runyon's Baron. 3,00, 2.60;i -- I T · T c* A rn rv.,;.^,,!,. o K \ ^nii Sir Alf took his squad on a Mcrgm Lefl.460. Quiniela (2-()| Wclls . four-game tour to Bogota andj Quito, South American cities with an even higher altitude, to tune them up for the title de- 28.40 Time 32.14 11, J.W. Red 6.40, 4.20, Walker 3.20. Quiniela (6-7) Time 39.78 I low net and putting winners ~riday were: ;Q Championship flight: First, E. cond, T. Allely; 1 , Putting, E. Wells. assignment at Sheridan High School, suburb of Denver, June feiise. In the first match IIKJ Twin Q um (2-6 6-7) $1,252.60 19j,, "jPutting, P. Schaumberg. -I Second flight: First. plaj'ed 11 men for the game's;, full 90 minutes. ;. "Afler Ihe game they appeared to be no more exhausted than normal after a match." hei said. "But what surprised Attendance 4,896 Handle 5249,782. B. Marich; Mesa, Colo., ·lHands Columbia 1st Juco Loss just the English, and for some wa s the length of lime neces-j Sea!s Ltd. 'Putting, J. Hinman. I Third flight: First, J. Carlison; Second, R. Putting, G. Ewing. GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. -- Mesa. Colo., College ,,. ^..-j -- . ., Harmon: 'downed Columbia State of Co- of the teams the heat, not the ; .itude, will be the biggest problem. Tournament play opened Sunday in Mexico City when Ihe Soviet Union and Mexico played lo a scoreless tie. Three more games were set for this afternoon--in Guadalajara, Puebla and Lecn. "The altilude hurt us." said Soviet Coach Gavril Katchalin afler the first match. "We have been here 20 days and we are still not bark lo our best form. But the altilude affects every team equally. II is just something we must adjust to." There is less oxygen in the air at this altitude so athletes be- ^corne short of breath quicker j a n d , more important, their muscles get less oxygen from Ihe blood stream than at sea level. Sir Alf Ramsey, coach of the I defending champion English jlumbia. Tenn.. 8-7 Monday night to throw Ihe National Junior Col- 'race with a total of 7ft6.2. Points determine tournament privileges for the 1971 tournament season. Trevinn also led in points with 948.3. Lunn was second with 793.9: Blnncas third with 791.6; I Beard fourth with 728.4 and Tommy Aaron fifth with 720.6. Player ranked sixth with 709.1, Dick Lotz was eighth with '01.5; Dave Stockton ninth with 677.8 and Bob Charles tenth with 600.6. Ashe To Meet I C a s - j ' handiIn French Open per Open golf tournament, Masters champion Billy per withdrew from the day event because of a injurv. i The four-day Kemper Openj PARIS l A P ) - Arthur Ashe's will be at Quail Hollow Countrylbid for the tennis grand slam Club beginning Thursday. inms in(n n formidable barrier Casper said Monday, '"I hurtjtoday when he meets Zeljko the hand recently 'in Japan!Franulovic of Yugoslavia in a when I tried lo play out oflquarter-final match in the French Open Tennis tournament. some very tough grass. I missed Ihe Memphis Open but. when I went out lo try to prac-! Ashe, the winner of the Aus- lice Ihis morning, I just couldn'tjtralian title this year, needs to hold the club. Mv doctor said it!add the French, Wimbledon and G r e e l e y Country Women's Golf Assn. snry for recovery. Four days later against Ecuador it was clear they had not fully recov-| SAN FRAXCISCO (API ercd from the previous match." Seals Ltd., original owner This becomes vitally impor- Ihe Oakland Seals, has re-. . ,, ., ,, - , tant because the World Cup gained control of the NationaljMidclaugh, C. f u l l e r and matches are scheduled with Hockey League team by aiKingsbury. judge's order. was no use trying to play in'U.S. championships to match Charlotte." ithe feat achieved only by Don "Right now," he said, "it'slBudge of the United Stales and Clubilene Baseball Tournament inloidoubtful whether I can playJRod Laver of Australia. 1 ·· ·· - ---'! - the Western Open! Bui Ashe. ' learn!a three-way tie. i pairings and tee-off times for The Mavericks of Mesa dead--! Saturday: of', From No. 1 tee: .locked the lourncy by winning a Icoin toss after the victory over next week in of Richmond, Va., or the week afler in the U.S.ihas made his tennis fame as a [grass court player. Franulovic withdrew from i is a clay court expert and is Open.'' Garv Player 8 a.m.'P. Schaiimberg and J . j t h e previously unbeaten fennes-jthe tournament earlier afler be-|thoroughly at home on the red form during this rest period, the team is likely to bo in trouble. So teams such as England, which came to Mexico with the starting line-up pretty much set- three or four da.vs of rest between games. If a team's best players cannot regain their top Schnackc said Monday thai!Flood. 8:07 a.m. F. Schoonmaker and M.isee club, and drew a bye into the finals. Superior Court Judge Robert;F. Lair, J. Hinman and D. Trans - National Communica-l 8:14 a.m. J. Schrcibcr and J. lions Inc., which owns the Hos-'.Rnslron. B. Eaton and F. ton Celtics, defaulted on termsjDroegcmiicllor. of ils agreement to buy t h e ! lied might be forced into mak-lfrom Seals Ltd. ing wholesale changes. Players " might leapfrog from game lo game, playing one match, resl- .ig one match and then playing again. PHOENIX. Ariz. ( A P ) - New Haven College, (he N'ew Kng. land champion, will nice! Livingston University of Alabama three-year-old hockey clubjFlorio. 'P. last year. i M f i r i r h . He adjourned n 'week-old 8:23 a.m. irial over the club's ownership'Wagner. H. mlil June 9. when Seals LtdJSuIhcrlnml. headed by 'Barry Van Gerbig.j 8:35 a.m. will propose selling the clubiXelson. G. for $3.4 million lo Charles 0. McArlhur. I'lnley, owner of the Oakland' 8:42 a.m Athletics. Sohnarke said he will rnn M. Lylle Anderson and and Columbia will take on Mesa, Ariz, Tuesday night at 8 p.m., with the winner meeting Mesa, Colo., in the Wednesday night finals at 8 p.m. Mesa, Ariz., downed Meramec] Th» latter' two "cities are ion-1 team, is more concerned ahoutjnext Monday in quarter-finals of sldcred one si'.e v.i.b Ihe teams what happens to a player aflerilhe NAIA baseball toiirnamcnl. A. Evans and Wheeler and I. Carlson and B. Ewing and R I In four matches between the 145 hvo players on hard courts, of Si. Louis earlier Monday 11-5,'{ ing called home to South Afri-jclay at Roland Garros Stadium. R. The qualifying attracted . . . hopefuls to the Myers Park; Franulovic has won three times. Country Club. Hugh Rover ledj Ashe has worked hard lo the field with a 66. It filled the;adapl his game to clay, the sur- iface he favored when he was I first starting tennis. He was in 144-man starling field. ousting Meramec from the double-elimination meet. Mesa, Colo., right fielder Dan Buffer homer lashed in the a grand-slam third inning -- M. Anderson S. Baisiey. P. Gross and P. lock. Mesa's second hit of the game to put his club ahead 5-2. The Coloradans had taken the Fights I'Rumania for a week before the French tournament opened to By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS work out with Hie Nastase and NEW YORK-David "Toro" '- "*-'" ~'"' """' """"''"'Melendez. 148'i, New York, slopped Curti?. "Youngblood" Phillips. 147'.4, New York, 7. SACRAMENTO, Calif.-Ra- i'ael Guttierrez, 159, Mexico, and! load in the first inning on a wild 1 outpointed Jimmy Lester, 151. ' ....... " Pit-' sidcr whether the sale is "con-| 8:49 a.m. T. Todd and B. Em- dueled in a commercially reas-jmcrt. onahle manner." From Xr. 10 lee: pilch, an error, and nn infield'San Francisco, 10. hit which accounted for Ihe first! HALIFAX, N.S.-- Bill Drover, 202, Montreal, outpointed Sylvester Dullaire, 190, Hartford, two runs. Columbia Oil 000 203--7 11 4 Mesa, Colo. 204 000 llx-8 8 3 Conn., 10. Ion Tiriac, clay court specialists. He has learned to use patience in the long rallies but he still has lo prove that he has the touch for drop shots and lobs. The tournament seeded Ashe \o. 3 and Franulovic No. 5. Cliff Richey of San Angelo, Tex. today runs up against Mas- tase, the Italian champion thij year and seeded £o. 1 here.

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