Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado on June 2, 1970 · Page 11
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Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado · Page 11

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Greeley, Colorado
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Tuesday, June 2, 1970
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Page 11
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Farm Roundup By DON KENDALL AP Farm Writer WASHINGTON- (AP). - An Agriculture 'Department report issqed today ihowl growing competiton for the'- Asian farm market. L*st year the United States exported only ft billion in farm goods to the far east, « drop of $200 million' from 1968, analyst CUrance E. Pike says in the report published by the Foreign Agricultural Service. Australia and New Zealand, predominately agricultural, ood consumption has risen noderately in recent years, and hough rice still is the basic food or' most people their diets are diversifying. pow the most immediatt competition for American farm er». Part of their effort is related to the possible entry of Britain into the European Common Market, a move which would reduce a major historical outlel for Australian and New Zealand farm products. This possibility and the fact that the two countries are seeking trade expansion generally are considered serious obstacles for further U.S. growth in the Asian markets, Pike said. Another factor involves Japan, which receives nearly $1 billion or approximately one- sixth of all U.S. farm exports. Pike notes in his report thai Japan's policy of diversifying sources of its farm imports wil mean larger competition for that market. "The major reasons behind such a policy are the desire to hedge against supplies being re _ _ v duced or shut off from principal fish ponds sources and to encourage other business in countries to purchase more o Japan's industrial products,' Pike said. "Also, developing countrie are putting strong pressure on Japan to take more of the! farm products in order to re duce their unfavorable trade WASHINGTON (AP) - After i two-year dropout because of Irought, South Africa is expect- d to re-enter world feed grains rade as an exporter this year, ays the Agriculture Department. The move could have some mpact on U.S. feed grain ex- orts as South Africa is expected to have about two million netric tons of corn and around 80,000 tons of sorghum grain available for world markets. Official^ said in a Foreign Agricultural Service report that South Africa is harvesting a 'eed grains crop of more than seven million tons, second only o the 1967 record of nine mil- ion. Domestic requirements are about five million tons, leaving .wo million available for export Life's Like That House Committee Votes Aid Cut by E Per Cent in 71 "wsr NIGHT i GAVE BACK HIS RING ANP TOLP HIM i NEVER A WANTED TO SEE HIM AGAIN. AN' HERE HE K IN SCHOOL! Today in History -M By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS miners were killed in a coal' " mine explosion near Fukouoka, By RICHARD LYONS The Washington Pott WASHINGTON -- The House Appropriations Committee Monday voted a 25 per cent cut in next year's foreign aid budget ( pleading the need to reduce spending to fight inflation. It reduced the Nixon Administration's request by $555 million to $1.645 billion. All of the cut was made in economic assistance, pushing funds for the Alliance for Progress, development loans, technical assistance and supporting assistance down to $1.3 billion. A $350 million request for military assistance, most of it for Asia, was left untouched. Most military assistance is now provided as part of the defense appropriation bill. The foreign aid has always been a favorite target of the budget cutters because it has no visible constituency, though most of the money is spent on goods in this country. The committee said this new appropriation would pust past .he $200 billion mark the U.S. outlay during the last 25 years to help 123 nations recover ;rom or prevent war and to develop their economies. This included $67.8 billion which the committee Stales paid -- .. row the money to provide the Catfish Crops on Flooded Cotton Fields Bring Profits Today is Tuesday. June 2, the 153rd day of 1970. There arc 212 days left in the year. Today's highlight in history: said the United in interest to bor Peace Corps Cul The budget of the Peace Corps, once the most admired of aid programs, was cut 20 per cent from $98.8 millicn to $80 million. The committee's report said "it is difficult for the most ardent supporters of the Peace Corps to list the accomplishments attained as a result" of the $900 million provided for it during the last decade. fi.es., June 2, 1970 GREELEY TRIBUNE P«ge 11. Japan. One year ago: One American, sailor was known dead and;73 were missing after an Austfa Queen Elizabeth was crowned in Westminister Abbey in London. On this date: In 1851, Maine became the first, state to enact a prohibition 1886, Grover Cleveland law. In --, -- -married his ward, Miss Frances Folson, at a White House wedding. 1 UUUj 3 infilligiid in ntuvv»j · nuiu *u*./u»««^ *.·-·-- On this date in 1953, Britain's Han aircraft carrier sliced the - - - · · u.S. destroyer Frank E. Ev'aiis · in two during maneuvers in the South China Sea. A woman knows a woman's needs. Consult our lady phar macist at Gilbert's Pharmacy. Weldorado -Adv. In 1924, citizenship llndians. Congress upon all conferred! American i In 1941, Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini held a war meeting; at the Brenner Pass in the Alps. I In 1944, the United States j opened a bomber base in the So-! Union to carry out shuttle! raids against Germany. In 1961, President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy were wildly; WASHINGTON - Georgia farmers are angling for new profits in flooded cotton fields. Once dismissed as a lowly scavenger, the catfish has been discovered as an important food crop. The new industry is just catching on in Georgia, but cat- are already big Alabama, Missis- age, exceed 50 pounds. They are he species preferred by most armers, and normally weigh 'rom one to four pounds at harvest time. mention o f ' its name suggests jarefoot boys in straw hats, homemade cane fishing poles, and lazy afternoons on a river- Dank. The whiskered quarry never troubled anyone to tend a line, it obligingly swallowed any bait, and flopped on the bank with broad mouth smiling. 01 d t i m e r s in Georgia remember a 148-pound catfish, and two Illinois fisherman claimed a 195-pounder. Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn using a skinned rabbit for bait, caught a 200-pound blue catfish balances with Japan," he said. Still another factor is increased food grain production in parts of Asia, notably India and Pakistan, which have been traditional big markets for U.S. grain, particularly wheat. Despite all this, Pike says, the Far Eastern market is growing. In most countries per capita Reduced RIO DE JANEIRO - One hundred pounds of harvested black pepper seeds are reduced to 30 pounds of product by hot water and sippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas, the National Geographic Society says. Changing to catfish from less lucrative traditional crops among them peanuts, soy beans, and tobacco, some.l,3(X armers have turned about! 40,000 acres into watery ranches. In 1969 they sold 25 million pounds of fish. The harvest is expected to double by 1972. Bring Higher Profiti "Switching to catfish farming n a k e s resonable financial sense," says a Georgia spokesman. "Fish require less care, ess labor, and sell for 35 to 45 cents per pound live weight. In terms of profit per acre, this figures out to be about $280, c equal to or better than crops ' previously grown on the same land." The catfish will always Interim Safety Director Named In Denver immersion in sun drying. "as big a fish as was ever calched in the Misissippi, I reckon." Blue cats (Ictalurus furcatus) share heavyweight honors with t h e flathead (Pylodictis olivaris), alias yellow cat mudcat, and goujon. Identifiet \Vil- b a Eloping brown and roundet m o r e statistic, than an however. economic The IJUNVUK lAi'i-- Mayor wn- iam H. McNichols appointed wo new county judges and an interim city director of safety Monday. McNichols chose Irving Ettenberg, 41, and Leonard Plancke, 37, for positions on the bench. The two new judgeships bring to 13 the number serving the county of Denver. George Canjar, who is in the safely director's office as a licensing specialist, was chosen interim safety director. He has been an assistant under recently-resigned William Koch. Canjar said he has no intention of filling the job on a full-lime basis. UJ d £IU1J111J£ U I U V Y I I a tail fin, a flathead 100 pounds and me "eel from tail to whi. Channel or spotted punctalus), oflen cor blues when their spot Sees with Whi Scaleless skin, s and barbels -- lo resembling feline v identify the catfish. In muddy waters sighted crealures i with their barbels. C sensitive taste whiskers probe the a lake or river d e l i c a c i e s as c snails, or insect Ian five a feeler whiskers - the near detect foo Covered wit buds, lh bottom o for sue You worked for your money now let it work for you Often shunned as a Ever hear of a 168-hour, seven-day work week? Every hour of every day the money in your savings account works for you accumulating more money. And those earnings keep earning. Start saving with us today or, if you already save, add to your account. It's the best investment we know. Where and when you save docs make a difference -- money saved by Juno 10th will earn dividends from June 1st. 5% on Regular Passbook Accounts 5%% on 90-Day Notice Passbook Accounts 51/2% - 6% on Savings Certificates i polluted streams, the catfish ulled from clean farm ponds s related only by heredity to is murky ancestors. Pumps eep ponds free of parasites and isease, and automatic feeders low protein-rich pellets into the ater to assure a plump, tasty rop. The rich diet amuses veteran nglers who remember hooking atfish with watermelon rind, vads of stale bread, pieces of eather, and bits of soap. Camera News By IRVING DESFOR AP Newsfeatures Normally, college graduation Lime is the season for job hunting by youngsters who have completed their education. These are not normal limes, however, in many colleges in the nation. But even though college classes, routines and ceremonies are off schedule, many young people are seeking that first suitable step lowards a satisfying and rewarding career. In the field of photography, it is evident that film making has become a young peoples' target. It is an area in which creative new techniques and ideas jolt the established industry when a film scores wilh critical acclaim, audience favor and a financial hulls-eye. Example: "Woodstock," an independent film gamble by two youths- photographer Michael Wadleigh and producer Bob Maurice- plus the financial backing and distrubution facilities of Warner Bros. The film is a tribute to the young generation represented by Mike Wadleigh. Operating as chief cameraman and directing 15 camera crews, he documented the three-day rock festival completely. Then, aesthetically, he directed the film editing and through electrifying multiscreen images and explosive sound, he eproduced the staggering Voodstock experience itself. With "Woodstock" a national hit, Wadleigh has prestige and achievement In act as spokesman for young film makers. He lad some advice recently about ob opportunities for a beginner, 21-y e a r -o 1 d Gerald Pallor, Hushing, N.Y. Gerald had graduated from New York Universi- .y's film school and worked briefly in Los Angeles on several temporary film projects. "In my book," Wadleigh said, 'a college graduale in film making gets first preference. It shows he has displayed discipline already in completing an assignment--getting through college. It's an immediate advantage over a school 'dropout.' "Secondly, concentrate on filming experience. Good cameramen are desperately needed. A novice can get experience economically by constantly shooting wilh super 8mm film. Make documentaries of events in your locale and use real people in actual situations. You cnn distill the drama of real life I happenings of real events nil! around you. Experiment and keep shooting. That's the way to become an expert. "Finally, you get a job by ceaselessly 'healing on doors.' Look up everybody in the film and related businesses and visit them personally or wrilc. Then maintain all your contacts by! constant reminders. By asking, you'll find out who's about to film what . . . then make yourself available. The fellow who! gets the job is the one on the spot at the right time." cheered on a visit to Paris. Ten years ago: A dispute be-! tween Actors Equity and New! I York Theater owners resulted in , . erT'fo/req'uesting""and Foreign a blackout of Broadway thea- dcmzen Aid subcommittee Chairman ters. The curtains went up again I Six committee members led by Rep. Silvio 0. Conte (R- Mass.) sharply criticized Sec retary of State William P. Rug Otto Passman (D-Lii.) for per- milting all of Rogers' cross- examination on the aid program o be deleted from the public record of the aid hearings. Seven days before President Nixon's surprise announcement that American ground troops were being sent into Cambodia, 10 days later. Five years ago: Nearly 200; Cambodia would "defeat" efforts to wind down the war, and that in any case Congress would be consulted first. Conle incuts "may Rogers' state- have been em- \VUrU UUH.IK OlillL 111IV v^aiiiwuvtiw, · i.·-..... ,. Rogers appeared before a clos-lbarrassing to the Executive n j cocomn nf PncqinnnV siih-Branch, but national security, i Branch, but national security, not embarrassment, is the stan- Protect your farm income NOW FARMERSUNION INSURANCE FOP COMP1E7£ INSURANCE NEEDS SR. Harold Snider 621 35th Ave. Ct. Phone 352-9274 committee. It was later leaked dard we have set for classifying Vaclat or boxen . .. anil r 10 sold lettered infor- nials with matching envelopes. Embossed Florals - 59c TO ps ALL Our own Tops/Ml Indies' men's fine quality · · · The same wntclies you've seen nationally advertised on TV. Includes calendar, s p o r t and dress styles. Metal and leather Lands. anil Always n dependable perform- erl Taper-Mate's 'Villager' contour grip pen, a great gift. NORTHERN C O L O R A D O S A V I N 0 S A N D L O A N A S S O C 1 A T I O N 924 11th STREET · GREELEY, COLORADO · TELEPHONE 352-6193 Heart Surgery SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) - A Santa Fe brother and sister, will undergo open-heart surgery | June 17 at the University o f i Colorado Medical Center in Deni vcr. i The two. Margaret Salnzar, 7 , , l a n d her brother, Matthew, 5, ; |have congenitial heart dcfccls., I Their parents arc Mr. and Mrs. Santiago Salazar of rural Santa Fe. Solid state AM.. POCKET RADIO 593 Assorted color Vellum paper in padded cover albums with attractive designs. Pages for photos. Our own brand radio is compact in si'/.e lint big in deliver- ; inR lop quality sound. Save! W«ofl or nifial AM/FM'AfC.. and SxlO" framrs in antique sold with while, Void' or rich walnut finish. Open Friday Evenings 'til 8:30 Solid-state model designed with tcleseopini: nntennn, car- ryirijj handle. Top performer! ] .11 SflTISFflCTION OUARAHTEED-REPLflCEMEHT OR MONEY REFUNDED

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