Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado on June 24, 1957 · Page 20
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Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado · Page 20

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Greeley, Colorado
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Monday, June 24, 1957
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Page 20
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Pajje 10 GREELEY TRJBI'NE Monday. June 24, 19571 i c ... ,,, , r ·/ Jews Slowly run Night tor hamily \ r . D , Scheduled VSednesday ! UO ' ng BflCk 1o Germany I Campus Light and Shadow Wednesday night i:. "Fun .\ij;hi" at C'SCK during the s u m m e r session. And the fun is fur al! m e m - bers of tin- f a m i l y -- m u i h i ' r , dad in.) in,' !;ii!». The fun nitihl program!- h a v e been popular features of Ihi- s u m - mer session for several years and apain Ihis' year the adii'ide-; will be in c h a r g e of (lie liriTcatiminl Leadership class, t a u g h t by Mia May Small, professor of physical education. The p r o g r a m lur tin- n i ^ h t M a r t - , at (i:30 p.m. in anil armim! (,'urilrr linll w i t h ac-iivitie* f u r rlnltlri'n and adults'. The west and north sides of Ciuntcr l l n l l will In 1 n i v r n over to Kami's and a c l i v i l i l s fur children while the c a m p u s ;il Ihn south side uf Ihc ^yni v.'ill lie :i- FiKlii-d to a d u l t a c t i v i l i e - i 'if m a n y kinds incliiilmii sliulfli'liiKiril, vol- I c i b a l l a n d s i i f l h a l l . Inside the f i y n i i i a s i u i n llii-rc will he both rjuicl ami a r l i v r iiauirs Mich as b a d m i n t o n and t a b l e t e n - nis. Tlir rectr.'tliwial n r t i v i l i c s al G u n l c r H a l l arc srhcilulril ID mil each night n t 8 p.m. except fur swimming. The pool will be open for two periods for children from 7-8 p.m.; .UK! for .'(dulls from H:W9 p.m. Thiist- who wish to use the pool [!i:[ ti;t\i- ( Mcmln'i'. rnlled in By HERB ALTSCHULL n i ' K S S K I . I M M K . C.crnlany i. 'J Me loilK way i»:iL-k 14 slow often p a i n f u l , but the Jews r c t u r n m , to G e r m a n y . \ol in ;,'rc.il niiMjInTc, for ny Jews the very n a m e Mills enrolled in (lit- .summer school may ohlam the c e r t i f i c a t e s at Ihc college h e a l t h service. Krusier 18. nf t h e i r families not en. sehiiul a n d u l h e i s w h o . wisli hi use the punl on Wednesday ; n i g h t s m u s t h a v e heallti c e r l i f i - . i-ati-* f n i m llieir p r i v a t e pliy- '· siciaus. Nu one will tie p e r m i t t e d in ihe pool whu is u n d e r . r )2 mche.s l a l l . The lallcr part of rath Wrdnr.s- day evrninij is K i v r n over In (ho s:iii:irc d a n c i n g p r o g r a m nt the ( r n n i s fuurt.s south of Ihe Student Union h u i l i l i n u . Kaia-int; s t a r t s at o p.Hi. antl c^Miiii'.iC. 1 -: u n t i l 10 p.m. Anyone m a y d u n c e ; e n r u l l i n e n t , drik \ a n D a m . lie fled (Jennany in the college is not a r e t i u i r e i n c n l d u r i n g the rcijin of lorror and re- In t a k e p a r l . Persons w i t h o u t p a r t - j t u r n r d a decade atfo. : ners are especially urfitd to a t - { "The people who come b a c k ; ·l'-j m i l l i o n Jews in the ; e a r l y I'.:. Of that n u m b e r , 180,000 were ,rman Jews. In this b e a u t i f u l city on the ' I t l i i m i , I h i (lennan Jews h a v e snt · I up a council whose basic joh is · t o heJ|i Ihe r e t u r n i n g fugitives ' . s e t t l e c o m f o r t a b l y i n t o nuw homes. The man who runs the council · is a lawyer from Berlin, Dr. llen- lend because partners can be arranged. llaby M l l i n u for children u n d e r I h r e e will be p r o v i d e f l for parents who wish lo lake pan in the WeL 'elcotne SUMMER STUDENTS For The Finest In Beauty and Barber Work . . . VISIT OUR SHOP SOON Hal Wolfe Barber and Beauty Salon 1 Block North of the New Woolworth Store 716 9th Avenue Phone 5386 hould h a v e no feeling of resent-\ mi-ill, nor should they have any pro-(j(;nn:in . i c n l i m e n t a l i t y , " says Dr. van n u m . "Jews w i t h such s e n l i m e n l s can live p e a c e f u l l y outside Germ any. | bul there is no place for I hem ; here." l i e says t h e present-day Jewish I population of G e r m a n y is about 130,000, of whom some 2,500 live in C o m m u n i s t Easl G e r m a n y . | This is a h a n d f u l compared lo Uie bustling, influential J e w i s h , c o m m u n i t y of GOfl.OOO In G e r m a n y j before the rise of Hitler. La.sl year alone, he reports, the n u m b e r of. .lows in G e r m a n y increased by 2,000. The larger proportion o f Uic r e t u r n e e s came from I s r a e l , where they found llieir economic opportunities rc- striclcd. This striking sludy of light and shadow on Crabba hall, a Colorado State College of Education landmark, should interest camera fans, whelher or not they are sfudenfj here for fha summar seiiion. Crabbe hall houses Home Economics and Social studies. -- Photo by Skeets Calvin. To Appear at Ealon Baptist Church Tuesday square dancing. Children will be rnrcil for in Ihe Panel Lounge of the Sludcnl Union hy incinbcvs of Ihc Hecrcntonnl Leadership class. Welcome SUMMER STUDENTS - Enjoy your stay -- in cool clothing from Gregory's Cool Summer Slacks · Cotlon Pllsses · Woven Madros · Washable Rayons FOR THE NATION'S LEADING BRANDS Hnlf Klnck West of Ihe 1'oal Office nl Sl.l 8th Strcel Summer Faculty The Northwcsternars, a musical ensemble from Northwestern College, Minneapolis, Minn., will appear at the First Baptist church of Eaton Tuesday evening at 7:30 o'clock. Members of the group are, left to right, Lois Bergcson of Fertile, Minn., accompanist, Howard Norgaard of Harlan, Iowa, baritone, Janet Graber of Bridgewater, S. D., soprano, Maurice Knudsen, first tenor, and Dick Jensen, senor tenor, both of Harlan, Iowa, and Loren Andersen of Lansing, III., bass. The group's repertoire w'dl include several different combinations of solo, duet, trio, quartet and quintet numbers, giving a wide variety to Ihe musical program. Andersen, whose father Is a minister, will bring a short message during the evening. Miss Bergeson is a senior majoring in music education. The other five are sophomores whose majors Vnclude Bible, music and education. The group will he making 52 .appearances on a 6,500 mile tour through a nine-state area. AP N«wsf«aturti June marks the 2ith anniversary of the introduction of one of this country's most popular building materials - asbestos cement sid- iss 5hin2 ll " ; Introduced in 1932. enough asbestos_-i-crnor:t sliinglcs have been madu" lo side approximately seven million honu-s. Asbestos-cement siding ii made of asbestos, fibers and portland cement. U is rigid anil .·.Iron)!, cannot burn, rot or be eaten by termites or other insects. It is wea'.h- LT-resblant and, while ii can be painted if desired, il does not require painting for preservation. N.w Developments The various asbestos-cement sidings being made today represent the results ot years of laboratory and field research. The big news for home builders arc i.hc recent developments in Ihe quality, style and methods of applying the siding. In the past 18 months, manufacturers have introduced a wide variety ot new colors, textures and sizes. One of the most popular trends is an improved application method, emphasizing Ihe horizontal shadow lines between siding courses. This deep shadow effect is achieved through the use ot fiberboard shingle backer, or nailing strip, muled the sidin!!. Because shadow lines change with the position of rii the sun, adding interest and char- .fi i acler lo house exteriors, this new ·'jI application method has caught on ; : 'j with home builders throughout the country. In addition, the fiberboard backer provides insulation and makes exterior walls more weather-resistant. The new method mceis the standards and requirements for use on homes financed by the Federal Housing Administration. Many Sizes Asbestos siding shingles now come in a wicic range of sizes. The standard 12 by 24 inch shingles are still the most popular. However, there now are long, narrow shingles--twice the length of the customary shingle--which can be applied clapboard fashion. This style is especially adapted to the long, rangy lype ol house and is filling long-felt need. There also are over-size units to mee't other architectural requirements. The larger shingles reduce the number needed and simplify the application procedure. Color stylists have worked with product engineers to develop new surface textures and colors. The colors, ranging from pastels to deeper tones and shades. Surface textures have been developed which emphasize both vertical and horizantal striations, with some having a glazed surface cmooth to touch. Arrived During Depr::;^t These multi-enjored, many-iized slnngh-s are vastly different from the crude. Cray units pui on Ihe market in J932. But those first asbestos-cement shingles nt^eiiiic- less wire well received, beins used chiefly in the rejuvejiaiion °' old homes. In that year, you will remember, Ihe building of new homes--and almos! everything else --was at an all-time low. Q(J'J!v ?n\vl«h. U was- as a result : of a military need for camouflaged buildings, during World War 11. t h a t the first colored shingles were developed. Today, they are among ! the most widely-used materials for : residences. jfamily Safejn Truck i LANDER, Wyo. * - A long :uigLf» disromfnrt was apparently all that Mr. and Mrs. Melvin ! Anderson, their iafanc child and Wo other yo'ungslers suffered. But sheriff's ofllcers feaieu worse until they located Anderson's ir-xk Sunday, sli'clt in mud 'on Ihe Upper Sawmill Creek Road. Sheriff C. A. MacDougall led lie , early-morning search party that found all five in good condition. The lender couple, Iheir 6-week- old child and Hcichard ami Jimmy Roe had been exploring the road. .When Ihe truck stuck, they wailed inside. J U S E T H E T R I B U N E WANT A D S Welcome Summer Students gkfa Full and Tailored Styles Floral Prints Checks Printed Canvas Silk and Cotton Linens Plain Twill] Sixes 22 to 30, 32 to 36 5,95 to 14.95 COOL Blouses in cottons or linens · Plains · Checks · Stripes Sixes 32 to 40 2.98 to 5.95 NEXT TO STERLING THEATRE ichard R. Marsh, assistant fessor of humanities and his- Ham lino University, St. Ri profi lory Paul, Minn. Coast Guard R e c r u i t e r Here U.S. Coast Guard Ilocrmting Of- ' ^ I '"" AqBSD « Roy A. Radtke, director dustrial arts, Milwaukee schools. of in- Public Livestock Men Elect EXCJJI.S10R SriiUVGS, Mo. Ml -- Forest Noc 1 ! of Lcwiston, Mont., fico. Sixteenth and A r a p a h o e was c | cct( ,d president o[ the slrrcls in Denver, announced that '· A m e r i c a n National Livestock Auc- Reeruiler Donald E. Darnaiicr. ( i 01 , Assn. at its convention here y c n m a n first class USC'G, will i Saturday. visit (irerlcy Wednesday to K i v e p i n f o r m a t i o n on the Ileaulnr C o a s t ' G u a r d , Ihe Coast G u a r d Keservc Calling All Lars and (he Coast ftuard academy. [' D n r n a u e r will be at the M a r i n e , MCAt-KSTEU, Okla. Wl -- MJ- Cin-ps Ilr-cmiling o f f i c e in I h c ! Alcstcr Police Lt. Elmer Duranl courthouse huildinp here helwccn i investigated a disturbance at a I and 2 p.m. All young men be-1 drive-in theater caused when a I w o c n Ihe ai:r.s of 17 and 26 and I stranger grahbeil the public address any ox-scrvicenicn are urgfil to come and talk w i t h the coast guard representative. s \ s t e m microphone. The man yelled: "Ah, ha. At last I've caught you two together." A number of the darkened cars USE THE TRIBUNE WANT ADS quickly sped away. FREE ENTRY! You won't have to pick the lock.,. or blow the safe to join the fun... COME TO GREELEY GAS COMPANY Come gel your Free Entry Blank bcfort June 30th and enter our $50,OOO.OO "Name the Bryant Pup" CONTEST SALE PRICED 95 Sl.OO DOWN DELIVERS NOW 5-positian control Adjust back and footreat together. Fold It up, carry It about. Fits In automobile trunk. Stretch Out and Relax with this Comfortable AUTOMATIC CHAISE Liffhtweipht, weather-proof aluminum tub- ing that's really nigped! Full-length pat] filled with thick rubberized hair and covered with waterproof plastic! Open Evenings 'Til 8:30 Furniture Co. 2600 Eighth Ave. Telephone 4120

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