Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado on April 21, 1973 · Page 18
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado · Page 18

Publication:
Location:
Greeley, Colorado
Issue Date:
Saturday, April 21, 1973
Page:
Page 18
Start Free Trial
Cancel

18 GREELEY (Colo.) TRIBUNE Sit., April 21,1*73 Former Gree/ey stars take on big names Hill way, Landin enter tennis classic By MARCUS NEWTON Tribune Sports Editor The second annual United Bank Tennis Classic, which goes in Denver's Auditorium Arena Monday, took on a new interest for Greeley tennis fans when it was learned that two former Greeley High tennis stars will be in the lineup. The two are Rich Hillway and Jim Landin. Hiilway was a three-time prep state champion at Greeley High from 1959-61. Landin was a two-lime state champ from 1950-52. Along will) Mike Sprengel- meyer, another Denver lennis pro, Hillway and Liindin were named to compete in the $50,000 United Bank Classic when three regular VVCT players withdrew. Hillway will meet A r t h u r Ashe, fifth-seeded in the Denver tourney, in the first singles round Tuesday in the Arena. Landin will take on Czechoslovakia's Jan Kodes in the third match of the day Monday in the Arena. Matches begin at 3 p.m. Hillway will team with Mexico's Joaquin Layo-Mayo in the doubles competition at about G:45 p.m. Monday in the Arena. The twosome will take on Mark Cox and Graham Stilwell of Great Britain. Singles action for Hillway against the touted Ashe will come in the second match of the day Tuesday (probably about 4:15 p.m.). Landin will team w i t h Sprengelmeyer in the doubles Tuesday as half of the Classic field moves to Boulder to play in the CU Kieldhouse. That pair will go against Alex Metreveli of the Soviet Union and Butch Bucholz of St. Louis in the sixth match of the evening. Kinals in the WCT (Group B) Classic are slated for Sunday afternoon in the Arena. Hillway, a 1961 graduate of Greeley High, was state singles champ both his junior and senior years. He teamed with Harry Hinzelman to win the doubles title as a sophomore. Greeley won the state net team title in I960. A son of Dr. and Mrs. Tyrus Hiilway of Greeley, Hillway enrolled at CU in 1962 and was the number one singles player for the Buffs the following three years. He won the Big 8 singles title in 1963. Hillway was awarded a Rot- ary International scholarship for graduate study at the University of New South Wales in Australia in 1967. He was named to the All-Australia Collegiate team that year, and played "lots of tennis against some of the world's top Rich Hillway players" that year, he told the Tribune Thursday. Hillway taught lennis for the Greeley Recreation Division from 1961-66, and has been the pro at the Arapahoe Tennis Club in Denver since 1968. The former Greeley High star, wh» has been rated first or second among lennis players in a six-stale Rocky Mountain area for the past 10 years, has been head tennis coach at Cherry Creek High School for four years. Cherry Creek was I he slate AAA champion in tennis las! season and runnerup the year before. "We (at Cherry Creek) are undefeated in duel meets the last 2',:; years (29 straight wins)," Hillway said, "so we hope to add a few more stale titles before we're through." Landin, now the tennis pro at Pinehurst Country Club in Denver, was graduated from Greeley High in 1952. He was stale singles champ Iwice while starring for Hie Wildcats. Hillway told the Tribune that he "has played lennis with the big boys before, so it will not be an entirely new experience" as he lakes on Ashe, who is fifth in (he group B WCT standings and tied for third in (he WCT doubles standings. "I have played some of these guys . . . Dennis Ralston, Tony Traebert and John Alexander," Hillway said, "although never in front of a crowd. This will be a bit new." Hillway said Ashe has about (he best serve of any lennis player in the world, a serve that has been clocked at 120 m.p.h. "He (Ashe) plays well, with his main weakness being con- cntration," Hiullway said. "He has about lu different backhands . . . his backhand is stronger than his forehand." Hillway said Ashe is "usually either really iiol or really cold" on the lennis court. "He doesn't like to volley...he'd ralher jusl finish t h e point as quickly as possible," Hillway concluded. So, as the start of Ihe United Bank Tennis Classic nears, both Landin and Hillway are busily practicing on the artificial surfaces used by the WCT lour. And, while both Denver pros will be meeting some of the lop lennis players in the world, don't automatically count them out. Neither Landin nor Hillway is exactly a stranger lo the court, and upsets are the name of the game of lennis. HAT THICK -- Hals go flying after collision in left field between Texas Rangers' shortstop Toby Harrah, right and left fielder Alex Johnson during Twins-Rangers game;, Friday. Despite the collision, Harrah managed 'to catch the Minnesota fly. (AP Wirephoto) · Tribune Twins breeze past Rangers, 5-1 Sooners top Cowboys, 1-0, in crucial Big Eight game By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Oklahoma moved to within half a game of the league-leading Oklahoma State Cowboys Friday night with a 1-0, llth- inning baseball victory in the Arizona State collects 30th straight win PHOENIX, Ariz. (AP)--Arizona State University won its 30th straight Western Athellic Conference Southern Divison baseball game with a 13-1 thrashing of New Mexico Friday nighl. Leflhander Eddie Bane struck out 13, and allowed five hits, winning his ninth game in 10 decisions. The Sun Devils scored first in the second inning on a double by Tom Sain and Jeff Oscarson's single. Four runs in the third iced the victory for ASU. Losing pitcher Ron Adair issued Iwo walks, a single by Dick Harris and a triple by Oscarson in the inning. Six Loho errors contribuled to Ihe Devils' cause. Sophomore firsl baseman Paul Moskau hil a three-run homer in the eighth, his second of the season. College Baseball By Tho Associated Press Colorado 2.1. Neb-aska 0 2 Kansas Stale d-3. Iowa state!? Arizona 3, Texas El Paso 0 Colorado Mines 3, Colo, college 2 Missouri 51. Kanws 3 3 Idaho 5 14. Boise State 4 2 Oklahoma l.Okla. state 0, II innings Arijona Sidle 13, New Mexico 1 first game of their crucial series. The victory stopped Oklahoma State's winning streak at 15 games. In other Big Eight action, Kansas Swept a pair from Iowa State, 4-2 and 3-2. Missouri won its first game of the conference campaign, 5-3 over Kansas, before dropping the nightcap 3-1. And Nebraska edged Colorado 2-1 after losing its opener to the Buffaloes 2-0. Oklahoma and Oklahoma State collide today in a doubleheader. The Sooners are 8-2, Ihe Cowboys 8-1. Oklahoma State pitcher Harold Tompkins walked in the winning run in the bottom of the llth Friday after third baseman Mike Umfleet had led off the inning with a walk. Kenny King reached base on an error by Cowboy shortslop Mike Cross. Both runners were advanced on a sacrifice bunt by Lanny Phillips. Umfleet scored Ihe winning run when Tompkins walked Keith Drumwrighl. Jackson Todd went the distance for OU, blanking OSU on six hits and running his career strikeoul mark to a school record 204. Missouri won its first game of the year with the help of a two-run homer from catcher Terry Cole and a sixth-inning clout by third baseman Tim Urennan. The Jayhawks won t h e second game on the s l r e n g t h of catcher Dick Bradley's two-run homer -- his second of the day. The teams were scheduled to meet again today in a single game. Kansas State kept ils malh- ematic conference hopes alive with its double victory, boosting Wendy Over ton upsets Mrs. King JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) -- "II's Ihe biggest win of my life, without question," Wendy Overtoil of flnnond Beach, Fla., says of her victory over Billic Jean King in Ilio $25,000 Greater Jacksonville tennis tournament. Mrs. King, second-seeded in (he Virginia Slims lour slop, wasn't available for comment Friday ;iflcr losing l-n, 7-6,7-0. Bui her temper apparently got Ihe best of her during Ihe mulch, which saw her lose the Insl Iwo sels by 5-3 mid 5-4 decisions in tiebreaker games, She threw her racquet onto another court al one point during the mulch nnd hil n ball into ii golf fairway al another point, (ho stomped off the court when the match ended. "I was beginning lo wonder if I'd ever gel n big win," said Miss Ovcrlon, a lanky blonde. She said il was her first victory over Mrs. King since turning professional. Miss Overtoil comes back today to mecl Rosemary Casals of San Francisco in Ihe semifinals. Miss Casals defeated Karen Kninlzckc of Australia, 1-0, 6-2, 6-3, in quarter-final play. Top-seeded Margaret Court of Australia breezed past Valerie Zicgcnfuss of Snn Jose, Calif., 6-1, 6-1 and will meet Kerry Melville of Australia today. Miss Melville whipped Jnncl Newbury of town Cily, town, 62, 4-6, 6-3. its season mark to 5-5. Andy Replogie went the distance in (he first game, limping Cyclone batters to four hits. And he clubbed a two-run homer in the fifth to account for half his club's offense. In the second game, Kansas State put Ihe game away in the fourth with two runs on two base hits and a Ihrowing error. The two clubs are scheduled to conclude their series with ai single game today. Nebraska second baseman Dennis Shibata used a diving catch to turn what looked like a sure hit into a double play to give Nebraska its split for the afternoon. Shibata's heroics in the final inning saved the Corn- huskers' narrow margin. Johnson paces 10-7 Bear win over Omaha DENVER (AP) -- Designated hitter Cliff Johnson smashed a double and a home run Friday night to lead Ihe Denver Bears to a 10-7 victory over Omaha in American Association baseball. Johnson hit a two-run double in the third inning and a two- run homer in the fifth. The Bears pushed across four runs in the fifth to put Ihe game beyond reach. The win enabled Denver to hold onlo first place in the Western Division. Denver reliever Carlos Alfonso took over for starter Don Stratton in the sixth and gave up three runs in the last three innings. Omaha's designated hitter Jim Clark hit a home run in the second and Jim Wohlford had three hits in five limes at bat, knocking in one run. Arizona downs UTEP by 3-0 EL PASO, Tex. (AP) - Dave Brueker pitched a four-hitter Friday as Arizona downed Texas-El Paso 3-0 in a Western Athletic Conference baseball game. UTEP starter Ray Greggerson took the loss although he gave up only the first of Arizona's Ihree runs. He was relieved in Ihe eighth inning after giving up a walk and a single. Reliever Jeff Ho- gnn gave up two walks for one run and allowed another to score on a fielder's choice. Arizona now Is 4-3 In conference play. JJTEP is 2-5. By KEN RAPPOPORT Associated Press Sports Writer The restless wind took some of the breeze out of Bill Hands' pitches, but there was enough velocity left to blow baseballs past the Texas Rangers. "I don't like pitching in Ihe wind," said Hands after battling 36-mile-an-hour gusts to pitch the Minnesota Twins to a 5-1 victory Friday. Apparently the Rangers didn't like hilling in the wind, either. They only managed four hits off Minnesota's right-hand- er. In other American League games, Ihe Baltimore Orioles nipped the Detroit Tigers 6-5 in 10 innings; the Cleveland Indians defeated the Boston Red Sox 3-2; the Chicago White Sox routed Ihe Kansas City Royals 16-2; the Milwaukee Brewers blanked the New York Yankees 2-0 and the Oakland A's trimmed the California Angels 4-3. In the National League, the Cincinnati Reds beat the Atlanta Braves.4-2; the Houston Astros stopped the San Diego Padres 6-2 and the San Francisco Giants topped the Los Angeles Dodgers 7-3. Hands, 2-1, struck out eight Rangers and walked one. The loser for Texas was Hands' near-namesake, Rich Hand. Mark' Belanger's two-out double in the 10th inning scored Don Baylor from second to give Baltimore' its victory over Detroit. Lerrin LaGrow, who relieved Mickey Lolich with two out in the third inning, allowed only two hits but hit Baylor with a pitch to open the 10th. After Larry Brown sacrificed and Paul Blair was purposely passed, John Killer replaced LaGrow and got Rich Coggins lo fly out before Belanger delivered his game-winner. Gaylord Perry pitched a six- hitter and Charlie Spikes drove in two runs with a homer and single lo lead Cleveland past Boston. Spikes gave Ihe Indians' star pitcher a 1-0 lead in the firsl inning with a single, then keyed a two-run flurry in the sixth with his home run. Perry recorded his third victory in four decisions while Boston's Marty Pattin lost his second game in three decisions. Bill Melton hil his fourth homer in four games, singled and doubled and drove in five runs as Chicago bombed Kansas City. Stan Bahnsen, a victim in the Royals' 12-5 victory last Sunday in Chicago, scattered nine hits and evened his record at 1-1. Dave May's two-run homer in the sixth inning, Milwaukee's second and last hit off Mel Stottlemyre, and Jim Slaton's five-hit pitching carried the Brewers past New York. Slaton extended his consecutive scoreless inning streak to 17. Billy Conigliaro doubled land defeated California, home the winning run with one Pete Rose hit a two-run out in the ninth inning as Oak-. ( r j p i ei singled and scored an- other run and threw a runner out at the plate lo lead Cincinnati past Atlanta. ;· Kaseball at a Glance Ky The Associated Press Starting Times in EST American League East W. L. Pet. G.B. Baltimore 8 4 .667 -Detroit 7 5 .583 1 Milwaukee 5 5 ,500 2 Cleveland 5 7 .417 3 New York 5 7 .417 3 Boston 4 6 .400 3 West Kansas City 9 4 .692 -Minnesota 6 4 .600 Uv Chicago 5 4 .556 2 Calfironia 4 5 .444 3 Oakland 4 7 364 4 Texas 2 6 .250 4 1 /? Friday's Games Minnesota 5, Texas 1 Baltimore 6, Detroit 5, 10 innings Cleveland 3, Boston 2 Chicago 16, Kansas City 2 Milwaukee 2, New York 0 Oakland 4, California 3 Saturday's Games Texas (Broberg 0-1) at Minnesota (Kaat 3-0), 2:15 p.m. Chicago (Fisher 1-1) at Kansas City (Simpson l-l), 2:30 p.m. New York (Kline 1-2) at Milwaukee (Slalon 0-0), 2:30 p.m. California (Singer 1-1) at Oakland (Blue 1-0), 4:30 p.m. Boslon (McGlulhcn 0-1) at Cleveland (Tidrow 1-2), 6p.m. Dclroil (Coleman 3-0) al Ballimore (McNally 3-0), 7:30 p.m. Sunday's f.amrs California al Oakland, 4:30 p.m. Chicago al Kansas Cily, 2, 2:30 p.m. Texas al Minnesota, :i p.m. New York al Milwaukee, 2:30 p.m. Boston al Cleveland, 2, 1 p.m. Detroit a t ' Baltimore, 2:15 p.m. National League East W. L. Pet. G.B. Pittsburgh 7 1 .875 -Chicago 7 4 .636 1% New York 6 5 .545 2',4 Montreal 5 5 .500 3 Philadelphia 4 6 .400 4 St. Louis 1 9 .100 7 West San Francisco 12 4 .750 -Cincinnati 10 4 .714 1 Houslon 7 8 .467 414 Los Angeles 6 9 .400 5% San Diego 6 9 .400 5', 2 Allanla 3 10 .231 7% Friday's Games Cincinnati 4, Atlanta 2 .'.'/ Houston 6, San Diego 2 San Francisco 7, Los Angeles 3 Other clubs not scheduled " Saturday's Games St. Louis (Cleveland 0-1) at Philadelphia (Lonborg 0-2), 1:35 p.m. Montreal (Moore 1-0) at New York (Parker 1-0), 2: 15 p.m. Pittsburgh (Briles 0-1 ) at Chicago (Jenkins 1-1), 2:15 p.m. Atlanta (Dobson 1-2) at Cincinnati (Billingham 2-0), 2:15 p.m. San Francisco (Bryant 2-0) af Los Angeles (Sutton 0-2), 10 p.m. San Diego (Kirby 1-2) 'at Houston (Wilson 0-2), 10:30 Sunday's Games Montreal at New York, · 2, 1 :05 p.m. St. Louis at Philadelphia,'?, 1 :35 p.m. Pittsburgh at Chicago, 2,.l p.m. Atlanta al Cincinnati, 2;15 San Diego al Houston, 3 p.m f . San Francisco at Los Ange; les, 5p.m. ; '' 'V;S/':^ : '-: : i^S^3;lyilp ';· '^f'^''^\ "·· '?\'\''''^%^$$$ " '··'·'' V!'-' ; 'V ''·'.,' ·'^Wiiiff$fi * f ?.^x£?$t?®P® · ? ' ' ' - - "i"'«v (·.$$$ ":·'·'-.[· '^b^'i 1 ' 1 -' '··;' '· " , ' / S K ' M · ', ' ; . ' · ' '':"·: SfcSII ,:\; : S';:-',v:'^-'^'';'',·;;?;; ~-»-A : ''-''-.-'?twnW-y U..,-·.··;· i'·-·-\-iV.;: ·;.;!,v^V' . y:-,;," I. :,·»;.-* :^:^'m : ^ Physical fitness model in Hartford With a cigar firmly between his teeth and wearing a sweatshirt emblazoned petes with New Britain Mayor Slanlcy Pak in a badminton match early thli with "Physical Exercise Pays," Hartford, Con. Mayor George Athanson com- month.Isn'tthemnyorannccxamplcofphyslcalHtness? (APWircphoto) x

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 9,800+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free