Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado on December 18, 1962 · Page 1
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado · Page 1

Publication:
Location:
Greeley, Colorado
Issue Date:
Tuesday, December 18, 1962
Page:
Page 1
Start Free Trial
Cancel

51,000 Applications For License Plates To Be Mailed Soon Approximately 51,000 application csrds (or 1963 .-Bstsr vehicle 1 license plales will be mailed out: to county residents by the County Clerk's office Dec. 28. Mrs. Ann! Spomer, county clerk, reported Monday. Jt.rU J.n. 2 . Sale of the license plates, both by mail and over the counter at the County Clerk's office at the Courthouse here. will start on Jan. 2. Sirs. Spomer said the first four However, Mrs. Spomer believes residents of thij county prefer that the over-the-counter sale* of the licenses Mart at the ume time as the mail sales. She also is firmly of the opinion the license* can be sold "over the counter" quicker and at leu cost than they can be handled by mail. The county clerk reported Monday the supervisor of the State Motor Vehicle Department concurred with her thinking that starting the counter sales at the would be assigned to (lie three sam e time as the mail sale» county commissioners and the! would best meet the needs of the county attorney, as was done lasti counl )' in Uiis regard ' The remainder of the first 100 numbers of the car licenses will be assigned to applications drawn by chance (rom the mail. Mrs. Spomer said the drawing (or llrete 96 numbers would be held in the County Clerk's office at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 2, before the over-the-counter sales of the licenses are started. Price Hopkins, new president of the Greeley Chamber of Commerce, and Ivan Klein of Ker- »ey. chairman of the Weld County Expenditure Committee oi the Farm Bureau will draw out the applications from the mail to be assigned the low license numbers the county clerk reported. U Cofltt Extra for Mjilin, After She Fumigates By PAUL IDSCMM Mrs. Minnie T. Holland, 70, died in her home at 1209 llth Ave. Monday night after she had fumigated her bouse during the cay with cyanide gas. An autopsy was to bo held Tuesday to determine if the cause of death was from the poison gat or a heart attack brought on by the gas. Police CilM Police were called at 10:47 p.m. Y Mrs. Gaynell Davis, 1205 llth to pay a 35 cents handling fee set by the State Motor Vehicle Department. Both mail and counter applications for the 1963 licenses will be -__,,.,,.. , " , "'" TM "«T saw Mrs. Holland Iving on accepted by the County Clerk', of- the living room floor, but when fice here from Jan. 2 throujjii ·' ' ' · Feb. 28. the deadline set by the ·talc for the licenses being on lying on the floor in her home. Sgt. Wilfred Green and Officer Donald Luti were dispatched to the home. They saw Mrs. Holland lying on they tried to go into the house, they found all the doors and windows locked. The officers finally removed a storm window and vehicles .. .vi.u»v«i a noun wuiaow ana Mrs. Spomer. in starting over! window from the south side of .he counter sales of the licenses the house. On entering, they re- Jan. 2. will be employing a «ys- tem at variance from the pattern which apparently will be followed -..~..^ ...... ., u ,m,, u .,, by county clerks in other parts of mined that she was dead the stall* ' TI,- «{,'.·»». .1 , ported being "assailed by powerful fumes of cyanide gas." Tliey checked Mrs. Holland and deter the slate Will N* Follow The Stale Motor Vehicle The windows Department sometime ago recommended the 1963 license plates he and doors to lir the building and called Rots Adamson. county coroner. Fumtf *M mended the 1963 license plates he Fumtf *M Durino, Day ·old only by mall in January »ndi The - v Ulwl tallcJ wiu Mrs that counter tales not be started )avis !)out wnat na(i hapupened until Feb. l. The neighbor reported that Mrs wuiu reu. i. * '"· 'iv,if;iii^ji ivjA/iieu mat fins Mrs. Spomer reported also lio " ani naii '"""fiatcd her borne Monday that the County Clerius ' rom mornin B U""l * Pm - She Association of the Hate recently had voted 31 to 10 in favor of making only mall sales in Janu *ry Longworth Gets TV Set As Yule Gift A 17-inch lelcvi'on set was jlvcn to Police Officer James Lnngworth nt the Craig Rehabilitation Hospital in Denver Saturday. Tlie TV set. with a remote con troi unit, was purchased by a fund-raising drive inaugurated by Wally Gilbert of Gilbert Upholstery. H was obtained at cost from Repp's Inc. It was a Christmas present (or Officer \Aingworth, who is recovering from bullel wound suffered Oct. 13. Taking the present to Officer Longworth wers Police Chief Ear Towning, Gilbsrt, and Jack Redus. Lonpworth was re|wrtcd to be "real happy and very thank fill for the present." Chief Town Ing snys Ixmgworlh "wanted to thank everyone in Greeley." Chief Towning estimated thai «brail 150 persons donated to the fund in purchase the TV set. Ixingworlh is still partially par alyzcd and is recovering ves^y slowly. i.id then opened the house to let t air out until S p.m . when she eturned home and resumed her aily routine. Mrs. Davis said she saw Mrs. Holland moving about the kilch- n nfter 6 p.m. and about 7 p.m. aw her for the last lime seated J the living room, apparently falching television. Loirn of Cyonido Purctiiw In searching the home, the po et Mrs. Holland have the poison When Adnmson arrived he con acted a druggist who recalled ciiing Mrs. Holland some cyan- dc and acid on Sunday, Dec. 18. He told the coroner and officers t was very dubious about letting Urs. Holland have the cycanidc. mis. nmmna nave me cycanioc. -- p«^« \»* m cam But, after she had assured him in 8' 11 certificate* were awarded everal times that she had used lo: Dwolhy Zabka. 1948 21st Ave. t on many occasions in the past, Cl ' ; Elwo °d Meyer, 2233 Linden he let her have it. Dr -' and Ra The druggist said that all the a ' ontainers that held the *cid and Afl three ,. n , = ,,,., r-anldo had been returned to the t««l of previous years Tht Wcathtr The Icmpcinlure at 1 p. in Monday wns 43. UK'al for 24 hours ending 1 a m. Tuosdiiy: Grcst Western High. fi2; low, 24. Public Service High. 6.1; low, 22. Rarnmrlor al B a m. Tuesday KKi and rising. Sun ru-os and sds WpdncsHay 7:17 a m. and 4:17 p.m. COLORADO - OmsidoraMi cloudiness tonichl and day: scalteiTil hiiHt snowy mountains, moslly in south por tion: a low rain ^hnwrrs »l lowp: flcvalions in Mtiith portion; cool W os.vl Wnlne^ay; low tonight 2.V3S south. 20 30 north 5 lo 1 mountains: hiph Wodnfsday 45-. at lower elrvalions. S0» moun tains. WYOMING-P.illy rlmidy I nijiht and \\rdnosday wKh seal tried liuhl .«nnw. in woMw mounl.iln*. cmilor past Wedn? day: Inw loniphl 2030 a( Inw elevations. .VIS nminlaiiw; hig Wwlnosday So» mulneaM, 4fl» *· ·nd north, . lolland had purchased a fumigat ng compound a day or two be- Find (Continued on pugs 20) n ° te JFK, Macmillan Meet at Nassau Pr «v I , v j j President Kennedv and British r « , v j j Presient Kennedv and British , , ... ,,.. . . . Prime Minister Harold Macmillani" 3 ' mld ' ng ' W mtc - hclmeted Ba ---- ..... i ------ --:·- · ------ 1 . stressed close U.S.-British friendship -- overriding various GRAND CHAMPION in the 1962 Greeley Christmas home lighting contest was the Dick McGlothlen home at 2202 16th St. Theme of the was Christmas Meanings. The Manger scene highlighted the right side of the display The display wi! wsr th a :;oo gift certificate from sponsoring electrical firms. Tribune photo by Jim Hitch. WEEKLY TRIIUNE ESTABLISHED 1170 ! FliigS °' "* Lom TM rm "!th na-| interview broadcast Monday nigtl 'A P 'l tion s "^orated the airport lermi-'.in the United States. ritish! , ... .. . . . : ,,. _ . . . - h a m a n fc "' med an honor some time- . , said it will be before the United . u t o n i c a l n subtrop.cal sun. lems In a scries of little summit talks! ending late Thursday, they are expected to discuss such diverse matters as a formula for ending! their split over the Skybolt missiles and plans for joint military aid to India. They also plan lo survey the world situation in the wake of the Cuban crisis and try to figure out Stales can "come to any real understandings" with Soviet Premier Khrushchev. He said that a filmed radio-television! (Continued on page 20) Prisoner Swap Team Goes To Meet Castro HAVANA (.\Pi-James B. Don-.be swapped for the prisoners it CANDY AND CAROLS was the theme of this display, which won Elwood Meyer, 2233 Linden Dr. a second place in the home lighting contest. Tribune photo by Jim Hitch. McGlothlen Home Wins Top Prize In Christmas Lighting Competition ly JIM HITCH IrV Was "fhriclmo. frn*. A... l -r .L- j- .,_. . , . ly JIM HITCH The Dick McGioihien home at 2202 16th St. was judged best entry in the 1962 edition of the then opened the Christmas home lighting contest Monday night. Theme of the winning entry was "Christmas Meanings." T h e house, situated on a corner, w ,, ,, - by trim lights which outlined Its shape. The manger scene was located! on the !Sth St. side of the house.' Trees and border shrubs were! lighted. I The McGlothlen home succeeds! the Ernest Florio home, 1S1I Montview Dr., as Christmas light ing champion. The Florio home try was "Christmas from Our Home to Your Home." The Meyer house used the theme "Candy and Carols." -- The house itself was labeled the scene. sral of the display pieces featur ed moving parts. Alternating lights and record carols "Ve Ole Sweel Shop" and featur- !? TM, ' makcr and large rf aroun(i " centercd Christma , ' *** ° f "* Canes ' oUler tTMts Sev Denver Dry . Awaits !, which lighted in varying dc grees of brilliance as lights camt. on and off. Christmas candles am Steel Arri val won the top prize in the 1961 con- ° t»t! Greele Rtcfivti JIN CtfKficitt GGG. lien of As overall grand champion, the li " n , of the ' McGlolhlens will wri-h-P mnr. Gxids Store at McGlolhlens will ..... chandisc certilicate worth 1100 at ce officers were unable to io- any one oi ihc sponsoring mer- atc any cynnide poison, but they chants. earned from Mrs. Davis that Mrs. Contest ^ vm ^ A ,,. inn Electric Co., Downtown oast to Coast. Consumers Oil Co., Greeley Maytag Appliance Co., Herdman Electric Co., Home Light and , Joslins, Montgomery Co., Repps, Inc., and County Garag« Appliance Department. Three second prizes of t« each Reese, president of G r o w s Greater Inc. said Tuesday conslruc- the new Denver Dry . 8th Ave. and 8th St. is at a standstill because of a holdup on steel delivery. "H looks now like it will ,,,, some time after Jan. 20. before scenes The Montieth display actually! involved three houses. Huge let-1 ters spelling out the words Merry! Christmas .stretched alone the we will receive delivery on the steel." he reported. Completion Dttci About Sam. However, lieese said the build Sjoberg, 212 12th All three have placed in con- Th« Zabka home featured .. colorful array of lights bordering ----- ..viunui oiioj u. ii^uu uotaering The officers found a note, np- the house and covering all o! the mrently written in pencil by Mr trees. The winding walkway at' . . way a lolland and tacked to the front the front of the house was' out simulated Christina candles. Theme of the frihka en Robert The Sjoberg home was decorat into the display. Sjoherg's display was entitled simply. "0 Christmas Tree." Third-PI»ct Winiwrs whether there is any profit to bej made by the West in the Soviet relreal from Cuba and the Russian-Red China division. The prime minister, wearing a light grayish tan suit, said he had met 16 times with American presidents and he had found that'"the most important and vital element of all such conferences was the close association between our two countries." "Through Much Toj«mer" He reminded Kennedy that Britain and the L'nited States have leen through "much together in the past," and said they looked orward with high hopes to the uture. Kennedy responded warmly to Macmillan's welcome, reca'lling that this is their sixth mectin] during his own two years in the presidency. The Presidenl quipped that h was not sure the world was mud !er off after each of thei. meetings, but that he had benefited greatly from "the counse and friendship you have shown to me." Kennedy also said he believe! they did better with their talk ;y had met in a warn, climate and he described New Providence Island, site of the Ba hama capital of Nassau, as a fit ' ice for this conference, "an . otiations with Fidel Castro for he release of 1,113 Cuban prison- roups, and two members of the risoners' Families Committee, The International Red Cross, 'hich assumed sponsorship of the xchange, also waited for Castro's word. The Tallman home was lighted Tom the foundation to the top of the chimney. Huge silver placards were used on the ground to frame bjvarious Christmas characters and building 90 days before that so figures included the shepherds.' The court reversed a decision --··--·p. ·- -»." ""«'e «.»i M uguivs iiii-iuara me sncpnertis.i "« TMua reversea a decision resolved offshoots of October's ttat fixtures and other equip- angels and wisemen. Lights bor- by Dist. Judge David \Y. Enoch Cuban crisis Kennedv virtnallv mont rnn h*» inctallrri A n ~ n J t^« f^,-. _f il.- . nf rnl,-..~,J- c_..: _ .1 rr , , . . . ' · '"*«auj mont can be installed. Another delay on the building was caused when Denver Dry decided to enlarge the building.' This involved the installing of two ele- dered the front of the house. Contest judges this year were' Fa 'f Housing Act of 1559. Harold Klingenberg of Hamilton ! The high court's decision writ- wwking on the new Hested's store building scheduled for construe- n tion Denver Prv. the street jouth of Court Hits Race Prejudice _ ,. ..... DENVER (AP)-The Colorado ;,,,, , -11 rn\" rr!T ~-T" !ront of a " Ulree homes. The eves .'Supreme Court ruled todav in a ng will still be completed within and conicrs o( aU ^ homesjS-l decision that refusal to sell l.i days of the original completion wore i iq i, (rf i . . dale of August 1, 1963. Actually GGG hss to give Den .,,,.. ,,,,,,.,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,«.-,,,,., , ver Dry beneficial control of the Mary and the Baby Jesus. Otheritutions. ·an arrived Tues. to resume ne- was learned in New York. Trans World Airlines said one of its planes, under charter, Mon- rs captured in the invasion of day night flew 32.000 pounds of le Bay of Pigs in April, 1961. Donovan was accompanied on a ight from Miami, Fla., by Berta arreto. coordinator between Cu- medicine to Miami from Idlewild Airport. It said that between now and Friday, 28,000 pounds will be A flow of medical supplies to lives. liami has begun, presumably to an officials and Cuban exile flown from St. Louis, Mo., and 19.000 pounds from Los Angeles, bound for Miami. The airline said the shipments were ordered by the Air Transport Association, a private organi- , zation of aviation industry execu- In Miami, relatives of the prisoners waited hopefully for Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro to say when and if he will accept ood and medicine for their freedom. The S. S .African Pilot, 435-foot freighter Designated by the International Red Cross as the vessel to deliver the ransom to Cuba, headed south from Baltimore and is due at Port Everglades, 30 miles north of Miami, Wednesday. The Red Cross has assumed sponsorship of the exchange. If Castro and the negotiators agree, the ship will be loaded JFK Skeptical About Talks With Nikita ly FRANK CORMIER WASHINGTON" AP)-Presiden Kennedy told the nation Monda; night it will be some time befor the United States can come to an real understandings with Sovie Premier Khrushchev. But he add -.,--, ,, ,,,, ,, 1ITOro ed, "We are better off with the with food and medicine stock- | p , oporty ,,, a pro!pec , ive buyer of race, color or creed state and federal const!- Khrushchev view than we vith the Chinese Communisl view." In an unprecedented filmed television-radio interview 23 months after taking office, Kennedy- stressed international problems in ranging across the many items that have troubled him during his administration. Tried to Chang, Balance of Power The President based his pessi- nistic view of the prospects of fruitful talks with Khrushchev on lie fact that the Soviet Union, only two months ago, tried secret y to change the balance of power by shipping nuclear missiles into Cuba. Kennedy said the Soviets were planning to announce the coup in November but were foiled by the determined stand taken by the United States in forcing removal of the offensive weapons. Discussing one of the still unresolved offshoots of October', ifted at Miami. Plans call for Pan American World Airways jets to fly to Havana to pick up the prisoners. The ship will be in port or at sea headed for Cuba when the planes take off from Havana. Castro has demanded $8J mil- ion worth of food and medical supplies or equipment in exchange or the prisoners. The dollar figure is supposed to represent Havana prices and in he United States is estimated to be worth $13 million at wholesale. Set E»rli«r Story Peg* 7 of Colorado Springs and affirmed --· i --a-- ---- **»n. !!·.» uvouuwuvu tv[JV Ulal U1U CUDar From Dtnv»r 'he basic constitutionality of the missile and bomber bases would Otto Moore accept the and Edward'established the fundamental right abandoned hope that the Cuban be opened lo effective inspection. "A totalitarian system cannot of inspection which really is desirable." (Continued on Page 7) he j based en race and color." ! Georse Nein. 605 E. 16lh St.:! In September. 1959. James and Karl Kinner. 1717 7th Ave.: GlenaJElizabeth Khone. who are N-1 Cook and Gary Hixon. 2436 10th;groes, filed a complaint against' Ave. Ct : \V. .1. Bishop. 1S53 17th J- L. Case, Colorado Springs real! Ave.; Rob Anderson. P08 35th ·We. Ct.; Terri Drobniich. 721 W'.h Ave. 56 Billion Invested WASHINGTON - Private United Slates assets and investments abroad increased by move five billion dollars in !%l total of ni'arlv ?fi bllivn. estate dealer. They charpcd Case' refused lo sell them s house inj Colorado Springs because of their! race. j The Colorado Anti-DiM-rimina-l tion Commission ruled in l?M that I Case had violated the Fair Hous-i ing Act. It ordered Case to olter! Ihanllhe Rhones a house comparable! to a ! P (he one they sniil had becni ioul to another Woman Acquitted Of Assault Dies In Auto Mishap By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Automobile crashes Monday night and Tuesday took the lives of six persons, including Mrs. ^alricia Anne Collins, attractive 35-year-old divorcee who was acquitted recently of a char»e of assaulting an aide in Gov. Steve McNiohols' office. She was fatally injured Monday night. RALPH JJOMKG won I Mrond piece in th» ChrMmM Unhung eortwt iHlh hin "" i'hri»lmas T'W entry. Sjorwrj lives at 31212th ^1 TTflwnf plmlo by Jim Hitch Crashes Tues. killed Theodore ·V Clark. 19, of Pueblo and Joseph Proiette. 51, of Seattle. Clark's car smashed through a concrete railing on an overpass in Pueblo and plunged more than 50 feet. Proiette was kflled in an accident involving two trucks ind an automobile on U.S. Highway 40. about two miles wejt of Empire. The state's toll of traffic fatalities (or this year climbed to 4W. compared to VI in the same l%t period. Another victim Munilay nidrt was Albert D. Jones o( Denver. killed when a wrecking ta:ck tow- another truck rolled down a ·10-foot embankment on Lovebml ~ Pass. Jones' son-in-law. MeKin Terry. 25, driving the wrecker. w,is Injured seriously. The si.ile patrol said (·;«·'. .1. Jcr.son. 59. \V!:c;.t lilii^e, w.is killed by a c,ir rin\in hv .inlm D. Vrb.in. «. Dciivi-r uihn'!'. Jrf- Dfn n( TMY ZAIKA horn* at IMS list Ave. C t . «tvn .«econd place in th« Ciirlstman home lighting «mpeti(toa. Siwwmea. Santa Clatu »Dd his reindeer, a c.wdle lit -ialUay and bordrr lighl, went intn the wtrail arrange^ moit. Tribune photo by Jim Hitch. f ^ '· Jensen who was lyn'.i; en | ferson County street nc.ir I v c r ' s rj«nh»e..t limit.- i j Jensen dsxi rit the . r-w 1 1 broken nvk ami multiply ;r j injuries J. lia"p.O'~. .» mtuicd l.itoliv -.wn 'T* I was struck by a car TM j I'wHi |!fns«ay bypj« nenr Kn;h:n V .!!;' dirt! on niMr 'n .1 !m,ui;;ti i Officers said tlaliPKos »as hit !· a car drr.cn !« D.r.:il R iRatchelor, 20. wbn lues on a ioanon ca.ii of Pueblo Gallegon was walking acrosa the road.

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 9,600+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free