Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado on December 17, 1962 · Page 1
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Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado · Page 1

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Monday, December 17, 1962
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WriMm by HN-M* Crttfcy hi NJ1 VOLUME K-NUMMR U I" AND THE GKEELEY REPUBLICAN MIELIY, COLORADO MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1M1 WEEKLY TRIBUNE ESTABLISHED U7I Supreme Court Won't Hear Blue Law Case WASHINGTON (API -- Over about observing a Sabbath other a sharp dissent from Justice than Sunday plainly made it "an Red Party Guilty Douglas, U* Supreme Court dismissed Monday a challenge of the CREELEY DISTRICT 4-H WINNERS in the sugar beet project contest sponsored by the Great Western Sugar Co., were, left to right: Don Bihain, first, a member of the Kunor 4-H Club: John Jerkc. third, a member of the Bevbe Draw 4 H Club; and Andy Bihain, second, a member of the Kuner 4-H Club. The Great Western sponsors the contest annually for 4-H and FKA members in each of the districts. Tribune pholo by Paul Wscorn. constitutionality of unday closing law. Kentucky's enth-day Adventist Church were later was discharged for refusal related when the was denied un- to work on Saturday, her Sabbath. mployment compensation after (fusing to work on Saturdays, "his cast coma from South Carona. Declines Plant Mm Rult And, in an action of major im- »rtance in an era when many nanufacturing plants are moved because of tax inducements 6r her reasons, the high court de- lined to review and thus let stand a lower court ruling that employes have no vested right to and she was unwilling to work on CREELEY DISTRICT FFA WINNERS in bed projects, honored by Great Western Sugar Co. Saturday, were, left to right: Duane Wolfe, third: Byron Marlin, second; and Delvin Kohler. first. All are member s of the I'latU Val- ley i Kersey) FFA chapter. They were among 10 KFA and 4-H winoeri from the Eaton and Greeley district* who received awards at a banquet Saturday hi the Community Building here. Tribune photo by Paul Edscorn. obs when a plant ii moved from M state to another. The actions were the highlights : the Supreme Court's last opin- ra day before a Christmas-New 'ear'i recess. It will next hand own opinions on Jan. 7. Kentucky's blue law differs from Do-work-on Sunday laws in ther states in that it contains a lause reading ai follow:: "Personi who are memberi of religious society which observes liable (to a penalty) if they observe at a Sabbath en day in each seven." The law do** Mt Beat** by name any particular idigina WINDSOR DISTRICT 444 WINNERS who received awards from the Great Western Sugar Company Saturday were, left to right: Steven Grecnwald, 2ni!: Kenneth Neubaucr, 3rd; Kicky Sctinorr, 1st, and Billie Jean Neubauer, who teamed up with her brother on the third-place award. Tribune photo by Jim Hitch. IM fforta HI P«g« 7 EATON DISTRICT 4-H WINNERS in the beet project contest, sponsored by Grout Western Sugar Co., included Kothy Dcrr Pnrkcr, left, first. She is a member of the Pierce Agriculture 4-11 Club. Harvey Cozzons. ripht, was third. He Is a member of the clovcily 4-11 Club. Kenneth Muroyo, also of the Cleverly 4-H Club, was second. He wis unable to nltcnd the banquet in the Community nmldini; .Saturday when the awards wore presented. Tribune phfllji liy Paul Edworn. Tht Weather Temperature at 1 p.m. Monday ·a: M. Local for 24 hours ending 8 a.m Sunday: Public n. Service: High aid to all organized religions." The case the court agreed to near is an appeal by Adell H. Sherbert, 57. who taid she was But in another case touching on employed for 35 years in the - religion vs. state powers is- Beaumont plant of Spartan Mills ue, the high court agreed to rule n the question of whether the ights of a member of the Sev- in Spartansburg, S.C. In 1957, she said, she joined the Seventh-day Adventist Church and South Carolina's Employment Security Commission denied her unemployment benefits, citing a state law requiring applicants for compensation must be available work. The law also provides disqualification of an appli- ant if the worker fails to accept ratable jobs without good cause. The appeal said Adell Sherbert jplied to other mills for work ut they were on a six-day basis er Sabbath. The appeal cited the rst Amendment's protection [ainst impairment of free exer- ue of religion. The workers-jobs case involved movement of a plant by Ross jear t Tool Co. Inc. from Deoit to Lebanon, Terra. The plant mployed 700. The United Auto Workers tried get company agreement that workers laid off in Detroit tould have seniority for jobs al a Sabbath any other day a Lebanon. It said the company re- he week than Sunday shall not ItolV*** The Supreme Court majority resuTMbly in an H division, dismissed the challenge of th. law with a simple order uviig ao wbfUntial federal «.ue*i(» was* rifht-that whether wtrker offered certain inducements the plant move and that tl company in turn had agreed hire Us work force in the Leba (n area. The union brought litigation, ad 'anting the vested right conten ion. The U.S. Circuit Court ii Hncinnati--in the decision which the Supreme Court let stand-be! ; that there was no vest presented. But Justice Douglas filed a dissent saying the clause in the law Midwest Under Fairer Skies Temporarily By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Fog and haze accumulated to- lay over many cities of the Eas as springlike conditions paid a brief return visit to the Midwest Florida was warm again after ast week's damaging hard freez cs. but subzero temperatures igain gripped Maine today wit] readings of 7 below for Mil inocket, -5 at Old Town, -4 a Houlton and -1 at Limestone. In Fargo, N.D., Sunday after noon sights included younsters in shorts and bare knees, kites aloft 'ishcrmen angling in the Red liver, and golfers plodding th fairways in light attire. Howevet, colder air toda Local for JUiours ending 8 a.m today: Pubhc Service: High 1; low, J3. Great Western; High I: low, 21. Barometer at 8 a m . Monday 29.90 and rising. Sun rises and sots Tuosda ;16 a.m. and 4:37 p.m. COLORADO--Fair east, parti cloudy west tonight and Tuesday cooler west Tuesday; low tonighl 20 to 30 at lowest elevations, zero o 15 above mountains; high Tups- day in 40s west, 30s mountains. 5565 east. COLO. FIVE DAY FORECAST Temperatures to average ne;ir seasonal with n cooling trend. Snow locally beginning as rain at owcr elevation: around the middle of the week and sor.x 1 watered sniiw likely niwin toward he end of the week. Afternoon ligh temperatures 405 and 50s west, 60s east early in the week, owor to 20t and Ms hy the end of he- week. Night low temperatures 20s and ,10s early in the week, owering to 5 to 15 nt lower cie- ratfoiu and below zero in high mountain valleys at the end of the week. WYOMING-Gmcrally fair In. night; (air caM, partly cloudy west Tuesday with some snow over mountains and a few showers or jnow flurries at lower rle-| Valinns west of the ' Continrnlal ! Divide; turning colder west Tue.» day; low tonigh! 20s at lower elevations. 5*-!5 mountains: hich Tuesday 50s east and west. Ms mountain*. brought more normal Deccmbe readings to the Northern Plains after a few hours of honeymoo with 50s and 60s. There was some rain in th West and light snow in the Nortl east. The major vet belt was alon an almost stationary Pacific fron la! zone from the northern Roc southwestward across centra California. Rainfall was light nost areas. Light snow powdere mountain sections. Show also fell in areas soul and east ;f the Great Laki region, but amounts were n iteavy in the regioo, which wa Hit by snowstorms, (or sever days last week. On All 12 Co WASHINGTON' (AP) - The Communist party was convicted onday of failing to register as an agent of the Soviet L'nicn and ' fined (120,000. U.S. District Judge Alexander loltzoff imposed the maximum wnalty immediately after a jury of eight women and four men re- urned a verdict of guilty following 35 minutes of deliberation, t John J. Abt and Joseph Forer, attorneys for the Communist party, said they would file an appeal. AH 12 Cwnti i The jury found the Communist urty guilty of all U counts of le indictment. i Eleven count] charged the par- y with failing to register under th he subversive activities control in ict on each of 11 days from Nov. » to Nov. 30, 1961. no The 12th count charged the par- th y with failing to file a registra- me ion statement listing information ibout its leaders, members, and ' inances. 2:i The defense had contended that , be party failed to supply the in- e i] ormatkra because to do so might ju ncriminate its leaders and its af nembers. The 5th Amendment ha irotected the party against doing ' Bis, the defense argued . pa But Judge Alexander Holtzoff, trj n discussing the 5th Amendment, let old the jury: "These are matters ' Ab Macmillan Leaves : For JFK Meeting » By RAYMOND E. PALMER LONDON (AP)-Prime Minister larold Macmillan left today for talks in the Bahamas with President Kennedy, expressing confidence that "we will find a way trough our difficulties" over the Skybolt missile. "At this moment after Cuba," MacmillaA told newsmen, "w lave to try to make a reassessment of the position between East and West. Can the position be turned to our advantage! Is there i chance of getting ahead wit some of these questions-- nucleai tests, disarmament and othe matters?" 'New Prabhim AhtW He taid the troubles in Asi Tim McMillen Dies in Wyo. Auto Crash Timothy Gordon McMillen, 19, o La Salle was fatally injured Satur day night when his American made sports car left U.S. High way 26-287 and overturned five miles east of Dubois, Wyo. McMillen died in an ambulance eariy Sunday en route to a hospital hi Riverton, 80 miles southeast of Dubois. E. E. Peters, Wyoming High:|way Patrol sergeant, said McMil- t len was traveling east alone when - the auto left the highway, apparently at high speed and over- · turned. The accident apparently - happened about midnight. He had a been visiting at a ranch owned by Ted Blehm, formerly of Greeley v where he worked last summer e McMillen had planned to stay a larticularly between Red China sti and India, have raised a whole ^ ew set of problems. a "Our chief purpose is to talk ^ ver what has happened since our ; t ast meeting," Macmillan said. 11 Fresh from a Paris conference ^ ith French President Charles de Gaulle at which "close agreement" on defense views was an- , nounced, Macmillan is to meet c with VS. officials who plainly" rown on the development of na- ' tkmal nuclear deterrents. While Britain and France have pressed forward with their nuclear programs, the United States has urged a multi-national type force under the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and a buildup in the non-nuclear side of the European military forces. The controversy over the U.S.- developed Skybolt missile, whid ooms as the major subject of the iahamas talks, may bring this iebate to a peak. The United States says it may scrap the air-launched missile be"cause of a string of test failures and the cost, although Britain has been counting on it to insure its national deterrent role. President Kennedy has described the Skybolt, which is fired rom a plane at targets 1.000 miles away, as a very sophisticated missile «hose development may require S2.5 billion in addition to the half billion already spent by his country. Without the Skybolt or a substitute, Britain would have no modern independent nuclear deterrent of its own. U.S. Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara. who held preliminary talks with the British on the Skybolt Issue last week, also is going to Nassau. McNamara re- nnrfrwl tn Vanno^v .Qiin^av fin hie win ·aOOet to joU under sue ctrcumitaoctf was a contractual matter. The contract, in Ihii in did M entitle the work en to tbe jot*, the court said. The Circuit Court's ruling n rersed a decision raadt by U.S District Judge Fred W. Kaeu in )etroit on July 5, 1961. The or ginal action vac against Gem mer Manufacturing Co., but th ppeal to the Supreme Court amed Ross Gear 4 Tool as the espondem. A brief by Ross Gear i Tool noted it had purchasec iemmer Manufacturing. In an earlier case, involving the losing of a Durkee Famous 'oods plant at Eimhurst, K.Y. and the opening of another iethlehem. Pa., the U.S. Circai :ourt in New York had held the ontract entitled the Eimhurst ·orkers to claim jobs at Bethle- em on a seniority basis. The high court's refusal to con- ider the challenge to the Ken- ucky blue law leaves standing a tate court decision. The decision, by the Kentucky Court of Appeals, declared the aw valid under the Kentucky and the ranch while the Blehms were U.S. constitutions. Kennedy on TV Tonight WASHINGTON (AP»-Pr. sident in Greeley a (ew days this week. McMillen was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Warren McMillen. Tlie father is a well-known farmer and cattle feeder in the La Salle area McMillen attended the Beebe Draw School and was graduated from Greeley Hich School in 1960. talks. The Skybolt affair also kicked vltni *s TM the trial. Will Lissner. up a storm in Washington. Sen.| a vetcra n reporter of the New Stuart Symington. D-Mo.. saidi' 101 ^ Times. The defense did not Cuban Prisoner Exchange Seen Getting Closer WASHINGTON -API-Loan of' a ship to the Red Cross Mid reports of activity in the Baltimore! port have stirred speculation that! ncRc-ti.itions for it-lcnsc o( 1.200 Cuban prisoners may be nearing a climax. The speculation vas heightened iv these rtovcbpmrnls Sunday: The Kcd Cros .siid the African Pilot had been made available lo it for use if necessary, ship medicines and supplies to l.'ui'.i as barter (or the captives. The Baltimore Sun said the At- that do not concern you, these are irvelant to the c?se." He said only a living person, not an organization, can invoke the protection of the 5th Amend- To Jury at 2:35 The case went to the jury at 2:25 p.m. EST. Judge Holtzoff instructed the eight women and four men on the ury in the legal points of the case tcr the government and defense Tad made their final arguments. The defense argued that the arty was acting in an American adition when it failed to regis- r. The defense attorney. John J. it, did not dispute government /idence that Gus Hall, general ecretary of the party, had an- wunced be would not be a stool geon and informer and supply e party's membership list to e Justice Department. "Throughout history," Abt told le jury in his closing defense tatement, "the role of the inform- r has been an odious one and despised one. There is a long radition in our country of minor- .y organizations refusing to give r.e names of their member] and betraying their confidence," hid Miherata Act The U.S. attorney, F. Kirk Maddrix, told jurors that the Commu- J nist party deliberately failed to register with the Justice Department and so violated the Subversive Activities Control Act. "There has been ample time for them to determine what they wanted to do," Maddrii said. "It was a deliberate act." The party, if convicted, could be fined $10,000 for each da; of Violation. The indickaMt q*a6c*llf cat* ers on/r an ll-*y period, imfo ing a possible penalty of 1110,800, plus another $10,000 on a count charging failure to file another srm. The government contends that another indictment covering a dif- erent and longer period would e possible. Both the Justice Department and attorneys for the party acknowledge the facts of the case eveloped in brief testimony last ·eek in U.S. District Court. The ury will decide what the facts mean--whether the party actually ulfilled the requirements of the iw. Before recessing last Thursday, [oltzoff denied a motion by de- ense attorneys John J. Abt and oseph Forer for a directed ac- uittal. The jury was absent while ,bt and Forer argued their moon, but Holtzoff said be had no bjection to the points being aised again by the attorneys in leir closing statement. Only 1 Govt. Witness The government called only one Kennedy reviews his first two He att TMfed Colorado University ,-cars in Ibe White House Monday and was a member of Sigma X«| Fraiernity. He was a member ef Trinity Episcopal Church. Grce- lev. where he wned as an acolvte i k-an Pilot SU«AR BEIT PROHCT WINNIRS in th- FFA division from thf'VYInrhnr District were, Wt to right: John Buech, !*c- f-nd: Rk-lwrd Wrllifl. first, and Ue Anderson, third. Ench boy rereiywMin flwurH trnm Great Wrstctn Sugar Company which ·firs (lie iinnunl iiibipvcmfnt banqwl,.which wn«\ Mr! ot Collins Saturday for winnm in the Windsor-Fort Collltw dlsUidi. Tribune photo hy Jim Hitch $337,500,000 L«t WASHINGTON - More than M4.IB1 private dwellings in the I'nitfd Stairs were hit by fires in 1MI, wilh i loss of KW7.50fl.flOO In hompflwt «r!;. was raising steam and had signed must of her crew (or n sailing time of noon Monday (or Port Everglades, Flo, to pick up the. cargo The wife of James B Donovan New York lawyer »ho h«s been negotiating with Cuban Prime Minister Fidel CaMrn for (he prisoners' release Mid Sunday ni«M he had left New York, pos siply 'or Washington night in an unusual hour-long teJ- ivision interview. The program, called "After Two Years -- A Convei sation with the President." will Vje carried by the Columbia Broadcasiinf. System and American Broadcasting Co. television networks at 6:30 p.m. EST and the National Broadcasting Co. television network at 8:30 P rn. Kennedy returned to the iVhiic' House Saturday from an overnight May in New York. After attending ·hurch Sunday morning, he sa! down w i t h television newsmen Candor Vanocur of NBC. William t. tawrcnce o( ABC and George lermatt of CBS to tape the inter- ·jew. !! hcsan an active week for ennedy. He meets wilh the Na- ionnl Security Council executive ·ommittec Mon. and also hears a report from $cerctary of State Rusk on the meeting of the North Atlantic Treaty Orjaniza- :ions ministerial council in Paris. Husk, who returned Sunday night, is expected to tell Kenneciv !he I'mted States has * major task on its hands to persuade its NATO allies to contribute more eonvfntior.a! (orces to the defense of Eurrvpr. Kennedy met with Secretary ol Offense Robert S. McNumare Sunday to disciiw both Uw NATO nxetmj; which McSamara tended, and the wretary's talks in London on tin controversis! Skvnnlt missile jituntfot Sunday the powerful Senate Armed Services Committee, of which he is a member, is 2 to 1 against dropping the missile and "1 understand the joint chiefs of: staff also oppose any cutback." Joint Chiefs Favor Skybolt In a television interview i ABC- Issues and Answers 1 . Symington said the Armed Services Commit- ca " during his high school years. L,, , vil , wallt lo hear ' (rom , he McMillen is survived by hisjjoint chiefs on Skybolt plans after mother and iMher, and his broth- Congress reconvenes in January. Derby Area Hit By Mild Earth Tremor Sunday DKRBY '.\F) - A mild earth er Tom. a second vear student ai When Macmillan and Kennedv n charge ofl slr:it «-'f. v - Kemper Military Academy. Boon-|arranj:ed thoir Dec. 19-20 Bate- ville. Mo. 1 mas meeting, ilie purpose wa; Funeral services will be at 10:30ircMC\v East-West relations in Ihe woke of the Cuban crisis and the Chinese invasion o! India. These issues are now e\p«tec the remor hit the northeastern Den- i-er suburb of Derby Sunday. Father Joseph Downey of Regis College in Denver said his seismograph recorded the quake at 1:17 The qu;'.ke registered two on the 10-poim Kichlcr scale Downey said the tremor was not strong enough to mfljrt any serious dam- to take second place to mediate problem of Britain's role' . in \\estorn nurlcjr defense Denver Man's Death Raises Toll to 434 By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS i DENVER A P - Ralph Fraz:-j ~r. It. who i\.is -truck by a cari Nov. 15. died Sunday at the Dcn-{ ver Genevol Hospital. j ToHce will Kra;ier »a. hit ,-',! a northeast Dcn\?r intersection! and hurled into the side of 8 bus. i The driver did not sbp after the! I [accident, officers said, and w ar- I rests have beer made Frazior'j death taisrri t'ofcro- cV» 19M traffic fatality toll to tM. compared iu'h 47ti a! ihf «,ime tinw last yra: He said also it was about half intensity of two earthquakes that ix'ckcd the t't'.tirc Deliver jarea on successive days two jweeks a;:* 1 . ; No injuries or uarn.ii;e were re- j ported Shop ;ind Mail Karly Buy Christmas Stamps

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