Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado on December 12, 1962 · Page 8
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado · Page 8

Publication:
Location:
Greeley, Colorado
Issue Date:
Wednesday, December 12, 1962
Page:
Page 8
Start Free Trial
Cancel

Page 8 GREELEY TRIBUNE White House Asking Told What to Magazines By JAMES MARLOW . t -y members are among the most Associated Press News Analyst I important men in government. WASHINGTON 'AP.-Still tin-. This week, the Columbia Broad- settled, like a lingering sore, is i casting System and Life. Time the question: Who reveal«i what ... went on when President Kenne- -.·- dy decided on a showdown with Russia over its missiles in Cuba? and Newsyeek magazines s a i d Kennedy himself threw open gov- er"me"t files to two Saturday Evening Post reporters, one of them a close, personal friend, to of his National Security Council in a highly secret session. The coun- He acted after getting the views prepare a chronology on wha: CHRISTMAS TREES Wreaths SAALWAECHTER'S MARKET 904 East 181h Street CS$H? Wed.. D«t. 12. 1962' Last week the Post came tutl ~;wkh a story on what happened \A/I jam* *ho said what. It was too 1 YV II 0 I * vl1 *x-iJmenwd. too full of direct i | and indirect quotes, to have been 'dreamed up. j The most super-secret outfit in the government is the Central Intelligence Agency. The Post even quoted CIA men. directly and in- diiectly. including a telephone conversation with McGeorge Bundy. Kennedy's special assistant. And Monday night a CBS correspondent said Bundy supplied much of the material for the Post article. Pierre Salinger, White House press secretary, said the Life story pointing the finger at the President is "absolutely and completely without foundation." But there has been no indication from the White House that Kennedy has ordered an investigation of the leak or intends to do anything about it. And meanwhile the Washington Evening Star backs up the Ufe story. It said Monday: "Competent sources toid the ar that Mr. Kennedy did tell is advisers to cooperate (with le Post reporters) and that some them refused to do so." The Star said Secretary of Dense Robert S. McNamara was e who refused. The President will happened. It was quite a chronology. You're) welcome to our m o n e y l . . . for presents, parties or Holiday Travel at The Associates where you can borrow for any good purpose. Our rates are fair - and our repayment planj are flexible enough for any budget. The Associates are backed by over 44 years of experience and understanding. Just phone us -- or drop in at the nearest Associates office. LOANS :25 to $1500 ASSOCIATES LOAN COMPANY (Formerly General Credit Corporation) 911 10th Street Ph. 352-8490 GREELEY raut all this at his news con- rence scloses more than the White son, U.S. ambassador to ouse has been willing to far, the whole subject will re- ain a sore. This basic issue-who talked to porters about what happened at bier? If 10. thta what meaning do« secrecy have? you'd flop referring to tne a* your better cne-tnd-wiilf!" particularly after what happened! to Stevenson-will council mem-1 bers ia tl give a frank an now fear, if the opinion is npopular, it will be leaked? This will give some idea uf how detailed the Post story was. A number of people were quoted indirectly. But the following were directly quoted: Kennedy himself; his brother Atty. Gen. Robert Kennedy McNamara, Secretary of Slate Dean Rusk: Ray dine. CIA's chief of intelligence in a telephone call to Bundy; CIA Director John Me- Cone. and a number of people not otherwise identified except as "one of UK wisest presidential advisers" or "CIA men" or "one of the actors in the drama" or "one of those present" and six people (perhaps the same person) identified as a member of the council. the secret council meeting?--ge lost sight of for i while in th uproar caused by what the Pos said was Adlai Stevenson's rol be asked in the council session. The Post quoted a "non-ad Wednesday. Unless he miring official" as saying Steven th Jnited Nations, "wanted i Mu nich" by making concessions t the Russians instead of insistin on a showdown. If left unanswered, this state BARGAINS GALORE On Large Stock of Nationally Advtr- ti»ed Men's, Women's, Children's Shoes, House Shoes and Clothing SAVE 33% Off Of Regular Retail Price Sweaters, Bras, Slips, Girdles, Hankies, Shirts, Belts, Ties, Socks, Sweat Shirts, Jackets, Coats, Shoes, House Shoes, Slipper Sox, Sport Shirts, Robes, Gowns, Sheets, Towels, etc. Old Safeway Store ALLEN'S 923 10th St. ment would seem to undercut Stevenson's position in the Kennedy administration and at the United Nations. Stevenson promptly and repeatedly denied the Post account. He said hi; view was the opposite. Kennedy finally, but alter some days, let it be known that Stevenson had backed his decision to have a showdown. But at no time e )'e on has Kennedy either criticized Post story or denied its accuracy. Kennedy did not say that Stevenson had not first proposed concessions to Russia. That Stevenson supported Kennedy's decision, once it was made, can be taken for granted. His usefulness would be ended if he didn't Kennedy called on his council to get the members' advice. It has to be assumed that each would give his most honest advice, even if it disagreed with that of everyone else in the room. It is out of the different opinions, and the conflict of opinions, that the President could reach a decision. Even if Stevenson at first advised concessions, this hardly justify the public belit tling inflicted upon him by t "non-admiring official" in t Post article. But, just because there was leak on what happened and because Stevenson was belittled, two serious questions are left 1. The next time there is a sis and Kennedy calls his should onto i cri After the Poet disclosures- t] 013 gOO Campaign',. /- .. · ! ° f ""' LommirteesSpcnt ^^ !C1 O13 £OO Cont SACRAMENTO. Calif. (API Electronics To End Misprints of Stamps Studied WASHINGTON !AP)-A plan to use electronics to prevent misprints on postage stamps was disclosed Tuesday by the Post Office Department. The move, involving an electric J'e on the printing press feeding the mechanism, admittedly is a result of the recent furor over the m i s p r i n t i n g of the 4-cent Dag Hammarskjold commemorative stamp. The stamp became the subject of nation-wide controversy after it was discovered that a't least 400 stamps were printed with a plate inversion which threw the yellow background off-center. The Post Office was criticized in some quarters because it flooded the stamp-collecting marke'. with deliberate misprints to wash out the inflated value ot the original misprints. James F. Kelleher, special as|, sistant to Postmaster General J. Edward Day, said the electric eye will be used to detect sheets had of stamps which might be moving onto the printing press wrong end first during the second of twn color-printing operations. This is the kind of error which produced the Hammarskjold mis- a print. heir expense accounts In Los Angeles. Nixon's finance ·hairman said contributions to he campaign totaled $1,276.000. During the campaign, Demo- ·rats charged that Nixon was pending "a scandalous »1.440.- wr' in what they called a ruth- ess attempt to buy the governor- hip. The Nixon camp called this tatement "lies . . . outright mears used in desperation . . . MANILA -- Actual cost of importing is rising in the Philipi- pines, the fifth largest receive council of American imports. !\Ve are of that ... Brot«'i «p«*cUa( is that of our campfeBpL" Contributions from Kroups not directly connected with the Nixon for Governor Committee account- difference betvreen the U. Nixon reported Tuesday they pent $1.813.688 in UIP Republican andidate's unsuccessful cam- Keports filed with the secretary state's office showed receipts ' $1.850,518. T h e Democratic committee · h ' l h ll'lnlriul f m . PJ_ I ft receipts filed wilh the secretary of state, a Nixon spokesman said. Rood Awardf Up -- , WASHINGTON - Federal-aid .·hich backed Gov. Edmund G. highway- and bridge-building contracts awarded last year numbered 6.C53 and cost $3.200,000.000, up 3 percent from 1860. Brown have not yet turned in Aluminum . . . STORM DOORS and WINDOWS CLIFTON'S HOME SERVICE 352-6006 CHRISTMAS SHOPPING TIP! New HOOVER Portable the vaciun cleaner wilt everythinf JNSIOE · ATTACHMENTS FOR EVERY NEED! TELESCOPING WAND! NEW TUFFLEX HOSE (always attached) KING-SIZE BAG! UGHT1 IF YOU HAVEN'T SEEN this new cleaner -- stop and look it over. You will be amazed. SALE DAY every day till Christmas! PERRY'S VACUUM CENTER Authorized Hoover Salei ind Service 1501 9th Street Phone 353-0759 ·-- ^^^~~^^^^^^^^^^^mmmm^ We Are Quitting Business Our Entire Stock and Equipment Will Be Sold At Discount Prices Many Items Below Cost FILTERS TRACTOR FOREIGN CAR SPARK PLUGS FAN BELTS RADIATOR HOSE MIRRORS TRUCK CAR TRUCK MARKER LIGHTS WIRE -- 12, 14 16 Gauge REFLECTOR SETS FUSEES STOP LIGHTS STOP LIGHT SWITCHES TOGGLE SWITCHES REFLECTORS VOLTAGE REDUCER 12V to 6V CAB LIGHTS SIGNAL LIGHTS SOME SMALL TOOLS THERMOSTATES CAR WASH CHAMOIS WASH MITTS SPONGES WHITE TIRE CLEANER WIRE BRUSHES PARTS BRUSHES WHISK BROOMS BATTERY TERMINAL BRUSH TAPE, FRICTION PLASTIC BOOSTER CABLES 8 10 FT. DROP LIGHTS EXTENSION CORD 25 50 FT. POLISH RADIATOR CLEANER STOP LEAK ANTI - RUST SPRAY PAINT FABRIC PAINT BRAKE FLUID BATTERY CABLES AUTOMOTIVE BULBS SEAL BEAMS WIPER BLADES GAUGES THICKNESS SPARK PLUG IGNITION TOOL SETS CIGARETTE LIGHTERS FLINTS WICKS TRANSISTOR RADIOS TABLE MODEL RADIOS FLASHLIGHTS LANTERNS BOAT LIGHTS SUNGLASSES -- ALL TYPES COOL CUSHIONS-- BELOW COST WORK GLOVES POCKET SIZE 6 TRANSISTOR RADIO Wherever you so, enjoy fine performance and greater reliability with low maintenance. Economy note: uses on« 9 volt battery. Decorative two-color case, with pold-tono grille and accents. In newest fashion shades. Come see, come hear this pocketful of lasting entertainment.., today. 103 18th STREET CUNNINGHAM'S AUTO SUPPLY NEXT TO THE GARDEN KITCHEN RESTAURANT 352-5006

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 9,600+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free