Idaho Free Press from Nampa, Idaho on February 4, 1975 · Page 15
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Idaho Free Press from Nampa, Idaho · Page 15

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Nampa, Idaho
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Tuesday, February 4, 1975
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Page 15
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Dr. Lamb Don't change dosage By Laurence E. Lamb, M.D. DEAR DR. LAMB - I'm 60 and my doctor has me taking one digitalis tablet a day I've laken it for more than two years now for irregular beats of (he heart. He says mv heart is weak, but I have read that taking digitalis for a long period of lime can cause digitalis poisoning will) serious heart symptoms. Is this true 1 If there are any side effects what are tbev? DEAR READER - Anyone B , t a k i n g digitalis or similar medicines should never, absolutely never.stop or decrease the dosage without their doctor's advice. To do so is an invitation to disaster. It is true t h a t too much digitalis can cause digitalis poisoning. You can also be poisoned by too much aspirin, too much coffee and too much oxygen in the air you oreathc. There is a good r a n g e between the amount'of digitalis you need for most heart conditions and the amount ihpt causes toxicity. Your doctor strives to regulate you on an amount that will help you but won t harm you. When' he has you regulated you will not develop toxicity simply because you continue to lake the medicine year after year. If your requirements change he may need to change jhe dose. D i g i t a l i s i n t h e p r o p e r amounts increases the strength of your heart and may help to control certain irregularities. When you lake loo much il rimy cause irregularities of the heart. The type of irregularities and other changes on vour cardiogram tell the doctor if vim are petting too much digitalis, il thai should occur Stay on your medicine, unless vour doctor tells you otherwise 1 . Hints from Heloise Denture cleaner removes stains Dear Heloise: After throwing away many plastic cups because of coffee and tea stains, I accidentally discovered, by'using one for dentures in which I had poured - powdered denture cleanser for : overnight standing, that the ', cleanser also removed all stains ; from the cup! Hazel C. Pales » + * Folks, manufacturers of plastic wares tell me that scouring powders and bleaches will ruin them, Once the finish has been removed there is nothing you can do. They suggest using only baiting soda or a special product made for this purpose. To use baking soda, dip a damp doth , into regular soda and polish as ' if cleaning silver. ' Some types of UNABRASIVE silver cleaners will also do the work. . NEVER use soap-filled '. scouring pads for cleaning these plastic cups. You are taking off that coat of film which you can · never put back on again. -.- -- Heloise » * ; LETTER OF THOUGHT Dear Heloise: We wives are somebody's "sugar" too. If "hard" or "cold," a little warmth will : soften us too! . Works physically and spiritually. (Also works on "hubby.") Just A Happy Wife » * « Dear Heloise: I have a suggestion to pass on to denture wearers thai makes my mouth fresh all day long. When ] remove my denture plates at night, I use a small amount of mouth wash in the water for soaking. Gives -'the denture plates a nice fresh taste. Marion G. Smith WIN AT BRIDGE This is a good idea for teenagers who wear orthodontic retainers. Just soak the retainers in a mouth wash to freshen them. Heloise * * * Dear Heloise: Glue can be a sticky mess when used from the large economy-sized bottle. I filled an empty nail polish bottle with glue, and the small brush attached to the cap makes it ideal and easier to use. No mess, no waste, and doesn't dry out, Martha A. Wilson * * + Dear Heloise: This is a hint that saved me a great deal of work when we moved the last time. Each time I laundered the bed clothing and towels, I folded and placed them in a box ready to go- By moving time, I had the shelves empty and ali fresh linens to be put away in our new home. Mrs.IraHaines * * * Dear Heloise: 1 save boxes for gifts, but I don't like Ihe receiver to see the writing on the box. I cover the box--top and bottom-wlth gift paper. The recipient has just to lake off the ribbon and can reuse the box for her gift giving. Another way to save paper and boxes. Mrs. Lewis Rutledge Dear Heloise: I have found that the easiest and most successful way to flour a greased cake pan is to ' sift the flour into the pan, rather than try to distribute it with a spoon. Thelma Hall Quasi Tuesday, Feb. 4, 7975 Give opponents chance to err NORTH 4 A Q J 103 V K 6 2 » A 7 1 A K 8 J WEST East A 9 J A C 2 V J 8 7 4 V A 9 5 3 » Q 10 5 2 » K 8 6 J . J 9 3 A Q 10 5 2 SOUTH iDl A A K 7 5 4 « J 9 3 * A 7 6 Both vulnerable ',West North East South South didn't like this play and decided to give the opponents a chance to go wrong. He drew trumps with two leads and threw West in with his last diamond. West had lo decide between a club and a heart lead. Had he guessed the club South might well have gone down two, but as happens so often, West guessed wrong and led the four of hearts. This took care of'all South's problems in hearts and clubs and he made his rather doubtful contract. 'SKU-Si',UKll K M E l i r i l l S K A S S . \ JPass 'Pass 3 A Pass Pass Pass 1 A 4 A Opening lead-2 By Oswald James Jacohy · Things started out badly for South. East's king of diamonds held the first trick and he .·returned the eight. South could Iplay either the jack or nine of .-diamonds, but whichever one he Iplayed would be covered by ·West, So South could count two · diamond losers, plus Ihe ace of ; hearts and a possible club. . 1 He could handle that club ·'. loser by leading a heart toward his hand and finessing the 10 spot. If East held the jack. 'Soulh's contract would come home; if East didn't. South would teonly one down because while he would lose two hearts he would be able to gel rid of his losing club later. The bidding has been: 4 Vltit North East Soulii 1 » Pass 1 V Pass 1 A Pass 3 A Pass 4 A Pass 4 * Pass 4 A Pass 5 A Pass ? You. South, hold; A A Q 7 6 » 2 « K J 5 4 A A Q 8 2 What do you do now? A -- Bid six spades. Your partner has asked you lo make Iftls bid If you have a singleton heart. TODAY'S QUESTION Inslead of bidding five spades your partner has bid five hearts. What do you do no*? Answer Tomorrow / Send $1lorJACOBY MODERN book lo "Win at Bridge." tc/o Ihis newspaper!. P.O. Box 489, Radio City Station. New York. N.y tOO'9 DEAR DH. L A M B - I s there any danger in taking n daily tablet of vitamin D-12. combined w i t h Brewer's dried yeast? Each tablet contains 10 microgrnms of B-12 and five grains of Brewer's dried yeast. Is it p o s s i b l e t h a i the vitamins and yeast have added to my vitality and belter overall feeling (less fatigue)? This is being taken without my physician's advice -- who was unable to pin point a reason for my "blah" feeling Hemoglobin count is good. Or, could il be psychological? DEAR H E A D E R - T h e amounts you are taking cannot be harmful lo you. The excess that your body doesn't need is simply eliminated and not stored. They might not do you any good either. the extra vitamin B-12 and tliiaminc in Ihc yeast will only help you if you were low on these substances. With a normal hemoglobin I doubt that you h a d a n y s i g n i f i c a n t deficiency in B-12. Some people do not eat a properly balanced diet ami are low on thiamine. You could probably have done the same thing with an improvement in your diet if you really had a deficient intake of thUiminc. Vou are pretty smart. Host people who feel belter arc sure it is the effect of the medicine. The simple truth is that people often feel better when they do something for themselves or t h e i r (ioclors give t h e m · something, whether or not that something lias any real action on the body. II can be the psychological benefits of doing something. This has a lot to do with that old-fashioned human commodity called " f a i t h . " w h e t h e r "it is f a i l b in a medicine, a procedure, or a doclor. Never underestimate its importance. Senii your questions to Dr. L a m b , i n c a r e o f t h i s newspaper. P.O. Box 1551. Radio City Station. New York. N.Y. 10019. For a copy of Dr. Lamb's booklel on balanced diet, send 50 cents lo the same address and ask for the "Balanced Diet" booklet. PHONE 4C6-7891 or '159-1G4 t place your classified ad. H': fast, easy economical. lAstro- (Graph ''·BerniceeedeOsol Far Wednesday. Feb. S, 1975 ARIES (March 21-Aprll 19) li's good to be oplimislic regarding (he outcome ot evenls. It's equally imporlanl lhat your optimism is based upon fad. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) A worthwhile opportunity will come Ihrough another. If youVe not on the ball, you'll not realize its full benefits. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Weigh issues carefully before major decisions or you're likely 10 make an error in judgment difficult to reclify. CANCER (Jane 21-July 22) Work now for that which offers you an immediate return for your efforts, rather than banking on what the future may bring. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You'll be disappoinled with some friends al this timo if you ex- peel more than they can give. A p p r e c i a t e t h e m l o r ihemselves. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sepl. 22) Be of service because you're needed, not because you Ihink 11 will impress another. A job well done is your reward. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You have some good ideas but don't depend on others lo supply Ihe muscle. Success comes only il you do il yourself. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. Z2) Y0"u still have impraclical urges lo spend beyond your means. Pull in your horns today or you'll be sorry. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 33-Oec, 21) You have a tendency loday lo exaggerate a bil. II may make a more colorful lale, but you won't be believed. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jsn. 19) Be generous within reasonable bounds lo one who needs your help now. Don'l boast oi your noble (feed. AQUARIUS (Jin. 20-Feb. 19) You still have lo keep a light rein financially. Don'l spend foolishly for things unessential lo your practical needs. PISCES (Feb. 20-Msrch 20) Don't deal in half-measures now or perform (ess lhan you know you're capable ol. Set your sights on victory. your bfthdcy Feb. 5, 197S You will make two interesting friends Ihis year. Dolh will add Ins!of and zest 10 your life. One will stimulate your creative, interests; Ihe otner, how 10 gain knowledge. \\illll.lltoilllllll Farm Wife The Malm Free Press The News-Tribune. Tuesday. Febriiary4.1975 -- A-i Ag. teachers needed MELBA -- Well, another Community Charity Auction in our town is history. Though people who live around Melba ;irc not ordinarily extravagant, they do some mighty astronomical bidding on auction day, all in the name of charity! Can you imaginu paying 15 bucks for a ladies lea slmve- and only lo the knee? Hut thai lady did it! A pair of mens shorts, all decorated with hearts -- $20. That litlle red heart that went along with them was still beating away - I'll swear it was the same outfit Jolm Hayes got last year. Now Jackie Charters o\\ ns them and she savs Ilieydon'l (it Harry. By next year we will have toapply lo the heart fund for ftearl surgery and the rest of us will have lo Imve eye surgery. lion Wright bought a haircut for 55. That wiis a real bargain considering he only gets a trim once a year whether he needs il or not. Phil Pease shelled out $« for a fishing trip into (lie Uwyhee back-country. Let's see now-10 fish a day for three guys - 90 fish. Tlinl makes it about $4.50 a fish. Of course they will have all the blisters, saddle sores and poison oak brown in for good measure. On the olher hand when you think about all the Owyhee County beef steak and good cow camp cooking they will consume and the three days away Irom this civilized rat race, il should be wurth more than i nut, "Evcilovin" bought theone. dav fishinadeal lo a private fishing hole for$65. If Hie fish weigh six pounds, like the man said, and the law says seven pounds and one fish and mil- family isn't very big, those trout could cost up to Hi bucks each. I don't know whether the private lake business makes any differancc or not, limit wise. Guess I'll have to consult the attorney general for a clarification of this fishiny law Anyway Ernie lucked out and won the fishing ice box on the drawing, so I guess we are all set - all we need is the time to 8°. II was a really fun day and everybodyis ali puffed up because tlie auction did so well. We are already planning for next year. MOSCOW-There are n u t enough vocational agriculture teachers lo meet the demand, according lu Dr. Uwighi L. Kindschy, head nf the A g r i c u l t u r a l K d u c a l i n n Department at the University uf Idaho. Last year, more than a thousand positions in the U.S were not filled because of a vacalional agriculture teacher shortage, the rnllcjje id Agriculture f a c u l t y member reported. In ]'J74. llicre were 12 agrinilmiT dc|iavimeiils closed in W a s h i n g t o n high schools because (nullified teachers could not he found One was closed in Idaho lor Ihc same reason. In [dnlni. in In 12 new vocational ugriculture teachers a year art needed in fill leaching vacancies, according lu Kindschy The situation is something ot a panidiiv. lies-aid, lie noted Iliere :re iint cnim|!li vocational ;i)ra-iilliiri tochers uhile. in Nursing bottles cause problem (Editor's note: This is the second in a series uf si\ qucMinn and answer articles tin dental health by the Southwest Idaho Denial Society, in observance of N a t i o n a l Children's D e n i a l Health Week, Feb. 2-K.i VUiaiis.Meuntln l i i v T n m "\iirs in Klliillli-.Viiutli'.'" N A M l ' A - A baby's teeth can suffer real damage i[ lie i.s regularly put to bed with a nursiiiM bottle lilled with sweetened fruit juice, Inrnnila or olher sugared beverage. Drinking from a hollle at mealtime does not cause harm lo Hie leelh bin prolonged nap and nocturnal nursing can be very damaging lo e r u p t i n g leelh. When a child nurses while awake, the, liquid is swallowed so thai Hie time il is in cnntart with I he Ictlli is limited. ]!u when lie nurses in bed. Hie tongue and nipple pool ihc luniid annmil the upper frnnl teeth and ill the same lime can prilled tin- Imvcr frnnl Iccll' Certain bacteria change ihe sue.;ir lliiil is. (n-cH'ul in s.uccU'rieil juices inn dcr;i\ causinn .iculs The longer the practice is continued, the more chniKiyc Mill lie dime. Most ol llw ln-lh nl ;i child w i l d Ihis coiuliiiim are scu'i'h decayed. Kcvuuse ul Ihc child's \nMHK ;ii;L'. it is usually v (renu'ly dii'Jiaih. it not ill)- pussilile. In reslure ilif leelh I'M niiifiiuM- a jirnbh'in ol tliis iKil-ire. ihe deiilisl nuiy rer]iit'' I a cciiipleli history of the child's fiilini! mill niirsini; habits. Hut f.-cloic sijitiinf; any liealincnl. Ihe dcniiM will hnve l» point uu! In Uii 1 |,vinils the cause »l Hie pi "Mem and lake ilu- iluld t.lf Die linlllc or rljininatc ll« SWM'lS. l-cadiiij; denlnl scientists sa\ that IHI i l i i M past Ihe iige of tu immths lnnilil laki- a Imttle in bed. Such :i Imille is not necessary jiulrilioiuilly and nisleint -.er\r-s ; js ;i luirinful jKicifier iii" 1 -! (,ihi-r leaching area?, then is an liver-supply. Kindschy pointed mil thai qualified vocational agriculture leathers not only have a pond selection uf employment op poi lunilics. but slarling salaries are also a t t r a c t i v e . Siariini! salaries of those who graduated lasl year Irom Ihe 1 Diversity of Idaho with a bachelor ol science degree in .igncidiur.il education ranged between SM.tiOii and Slli.onn This ii Ihe time ni year high school seniors- begin In seriously think abinit what they will (in after graduation, said Kindschy. I'm HHUC c o n t e m p l a t i n g cnllege. be invites them lo consider agricultural education. lie rcininrled Ibal vocational apriciiliurc jobs are plentiful and HIT likely In remain sn. "We ,,r a a! a period in liitlorj." he said, "when food supplies in parts of ihe world are grauiiip slmrl." "'ll-.is mcreascrl demand for iwali'inal apriciillurc teachers will help boys ami girls gain Ibc knn« leriKi- n-Hi''l In help them Ix-comi- Bnntl l a i m e r s and raixhT 1 - and thus alleviate l u n j e c l e d idnil a n i l ' l i l i c i shiirljgc"-." Kindschy said. Bill would end fax on funerals H'USK ' t ' l ' l i - The chair- iiwn uf Ihe .Senate Local fiitv- miineni and Tasalinn Committee said lurlay he is drafting one mure (ax relief measure - a bill t' exeni|)l fiuierals from Die 'ales lax. Sen. l.yle Colibs. H-rjoise.5aid I'.e would have the proposal ready for consideration Ibis Wednesday. iVK -IGG-7891 or 459-1664 to place your classified ad. It's fast, easy economical. A helpful little message abouta very big Bank Card This is a Bank of Idaho Gem Account Card. The card is really the same size as a credit card. But it does big things for you at a very little cost. An Idaho Gem Account provides you with the eight banking services you are most likely to need: A CHECK CASHING IDENTIFICATION CARD This distinctive Idaho Gem Card entitles the customer to fast guaranteed check cashing up to S100.00 al any Sank of Idaho office and al all participating merchants. UNLIMITED CHECK WRITING Wrile as many checks as desired without additional service charges or minimum balances. PERSONALIZED CHECKS No additional charge for fully personalized wallet style checks. SAFE DEPOSIT BOX AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE Safe deposit boxes up to $6.00 size; depending on availability at the customer's branchoffice will be provided al no additional cost. UNLIMITED TRAVELER'S CHEQUES CASHIER'S CHECKS AND MONEYORDERS All provided al no additional charge as part of your Idaho Gem Account. OVERDRAFT PROTECTION Your checks will always be covered because we promise lo automatically advance funds Irom your Idaho Gem Account up to your available credit. REDUCED INTEREST RATES ON PERSONAL LOANS When you qualify for a boat, vacation, or other instalment loans, as a Bank of Idaho Gem Account customer you'll receive special low interest rales. 24 HOUR BANKING 24 hour day and night teller service bankinq when you wanl. ALL FOR ONLY $3.00 PER MONTH Another of many reasons why you can always do better at YOUR PROGRESSIVE NATIONAL SERVING IDAHO WITH 32 OFFICES AFFILIATED WITH WESTERN BANCORPORATtON BAMUMERKASEAVKX CORPOfWION 1M6

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