Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado on April 19, 1972 · Page 8
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Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado · Page 8

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Greeley, Colorado
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Wednesday, April 19, 1972
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Page 8
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8 GREELEY (Colo.) TRIBUNE Wed., April 19, 1972 First of Rodeo Queen f '.'..;·' ',····· . - ' · ' . , : · ' . . · Gahdidates Announced SixRof the 17 candidates for queelj of the Greeley Independ- encejJStampede, Greeley's 50th amni il July 4 rodeo celebation, are jeing announced today by the iRodeo Committee. The othe(B will appear Thursday and JFriday. Compctilion for the crown will end Saturday at Island Grove Parks when contestants will demdihstrale their horsemanship. S-The public is welcome to attend the horsemanship events. Wimjers will be announced f o l l o w i n g the competition Saturday. Among those seeking the title are: ? MaTgee Sue Bibbey, 2000 7lh Avo.jla student at Aims College. MissfBibbey is the daughter of Harry L. Bibbey and is spon- sorecj by Consumers Oil Co. Her hobbjes and ^nteresls include horseback riding, judo, skiing and Oars. Maty J. Brighi, 1300 "Polomar sDrive, a student at Aims College. She is the daughter of Dr. ind Mrs. Louis Brighi and is sponsored dy Adventures During Travel Service. Her hobbjfes and interests include sewing, needlework, horseback riding, piano, snowmobiling and all outdoor sports. Erjp Brunelli,.'2515 12th Ave. Ci., | student at the University of Northern Colorado. Miss Bru- nellifis the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.j| Quinto Brunelli and is sponrcdI by;. the Conditioning Spa. filler'Interests and hobbies i n c j f u d e : sketching, writing poelijjj, horseback riding, animals/ gardening, sports -mainly basketball and football -- hiking, motorscooter riding, Ewirrjrning and traveling. Patricia Lynn Cppeland, 1217 E. 2fth St.,."a student at' Aims Collele.-She is,;(he daughter of Mr. lnl Mrs. M i 1 fo rd Cop c la nd and Bcr-sp'gnsor is Moffal Paint and Jjlass.' Among her hobbies and {interests are swimming, reading ami rodeos. Jo$ Christine Dudley, 1308 K. BDIli St., a. student at Greedy Central High School. She s Ihc daughter of William M. DJiidley and is sponsored by the Sheriff's Posse-attes. Among her ijobbics and interests are horsaS, horse activities, sewing, arts Snd crafts and outdoor life. Eitien Mae Garrison, 1G21 Eklcj* Ave., a student at Greefey Central High School. She ifs the daughter of Edna J. Garrison and is sponsored by tlii Greeley Saddle Club. Her inlertks and hobbies include horsqs, barrel racing, western pleasure and reining, cooking, painting, sewing and dancing. Wifjncr of the competition, lady-in-wailing also to 3ccted in the competition, cprosent the Independence Slarrjpedc in promotions at rodeij's and other events across the stale as well as reign over festivities of the July 4 celebration. F.Also to be chosen is an alternate to Ihc queen. CIAA State Conference Planned Here B e t w e e n 50-60 displays representing commercial firms and colleges will be open to the public. Friday and Saturday during the slate convention of the Colorado Industrial Arts Association (CIAA) in Greeley. The majority of the .ClAA activities will be held in the University Center of the University of Northern Colorado. The displays will be on view Ihere in the ballroom. Over 300 industrial arts leachers from all over Colorado arc expected to attend. Sponsor of the convention is the UNC Industrial Arts Department. Programs involving special s p e a k e r s will b e , . h e l d throughout the day Friday' and Saturday. Speakers will include H e r r i e k Roth, AFL - CIO r e g i o n a l director, Denver; K e n n e t h Nichols, Barber- Nichols Engineering, Denver; and Mike Sucharski, Mesa (Arizona) Career Education Center. The theme of the conclave is · J o y Christine Dudley Eilcon Mae Garrison I Hospital | Dismissals Dismissed from Weld County Gcnolral Hospital on Tuesday, Aprilj. 18: Gocffrey Schweger, Tioulfe 3; Hnchel Unicorn, Milli- kcn;;Mrs. Carol Watson, Milli- fccn;ftrfr.s. John Hedlund, N u n n ; Jnan'l Gallegns, 031 4th St.; Stepljcn Root, La Salic; Mrs. Vera'iWashburn, Fort Morgan; Julie'Tarns, I/weland; Matthew .InncS, 1820 24lh Ave. Court; Mrs.j Ralph House, Hudson; Elmo;Jenkins, 2101 5lh St.; Mrs. Lucas (larza, 314 2th Ave.; iUrs.?.Ridfie Scofield and son, I«i Salle; baby boy Cervantes, La Salic; Mrs. George Mulligan, 0822 23rd Ave. Court; Mrs. Joe Salazar, 510 15th Ave.; Mrs. JacktKindsfallicr, Evans; Mrs. Hazel. Whilworth, A u l l ; Mrs. l l a n f o n George, 504 7lh SI.; Mrs.fCclia McCIure, Fort Lup- lrn;?.Ral|jh Steadman, 1402 7th St.; yrs. Larry Lulu, Lovcland; Mrs.JAdam N u n n , Koulo 4. The Weather 1 (UNC report as of 6 a.m.) The Weather Elsewhere High Tuesday 54 Low this morning 34 ^rccipilation _ ,, .02 Total for year 1.53 Normal through April 3.07 'Highest temperature ever recorded here on an April 19 was 00 in 1D32; lowest was 13 in IDCG. Sun will rise Thursday al 5:14 a.m. and will set at 6:44 p.m. Colorado -- stockmens warnings west and norlh portions tonight. Cloudy and colder through 'I1inr.sd.Hy with .scattered light snow or snow sliow- ers mountains and west and , chance of light snow nr drizzle northeast ; low tonight 30s south - 25 to 35 north 10 to 20 mountains; high Thursday 45 In 55 soulh 35 lo 45 north 30s mountains. ' Extended Forecasts f Colorado-- Chance nf rain Friday through Sunday, .snow , slinwcrs mnunlnins otherwise ' fair to partly cloudy; warmer '. Friday; high temperatures 55' (ir northwest fo IJ5-75 soulhcasl, ' 45-55 mountains: low Icmpcni- .' furcs 30s ami low 40s with 20s inuunlains. D.. TUip ACcnriATF Dy iriC M93U^ in 1 C H Albany, cldy Albu'tjiic, cldy Amarillo, cldy Anchorage, cldy Ashevjllc, clear Allanla, clear Hinningham, clear liism;irck, cldy Boise, clear Boston, clear Buffalo, cldy Charleston, dear Charlotte, clear Chicago, cldy Cincinnati, cldy Cleveland, cldy Denver, snuw DCS Moines, rain Detroit, cldy Dulufh, clear Fairbanks, M Fort Worlh. cldy (injcn Hay, rain Helena, dear Honolulu, Iclcar llnuslon, cldy Ind'apolis, cldy Jiicks'villc. cldy .Imicaii, M Kansas Cilv, ddy I.illli! Huek, cidv Wyoming -- slnrkmons warn-il.iis Anqoles. cldy · ings tonight. Cloudy and cold 'Louisville, dil.v · llirti«h Thursday with orcii-iMurciiiHIu, c'.Jly i sional lighl snow likely: local' Memphis, rldy - blowing snow; high Thursday i.Minini, cle;ir i 30s and low 40s. Low lonighl Milwaukee, cldv ; 20s at lower rlcvntiiins 10 In 20 Mpls-.SI.l'., clilv TYirmnlniiK . Wnu. Hi-lninc ^1,1,. : r» np pCC . U 1 f\.C9M qh Low Pr 68 47 _. 74 52 .... (M 58 .. 33 M M 75 47 ... 79 55 ·_ S3 57 .. 43 34 . 40 2C _. fif 49 ... (in so _. 73 65 ... 80 49 . 78 57 '1 7(1 50 7li 58 . 57 3i 1 Bl 44 M 74 4!) .. 3!) 34 . M M i\ B5 72 5G 3G .0! 20 !7 .. 82 72 ... 7!). 72 80 ISO .. 80 112 .O: M ,\l Jr 88 ia .or 85 5fl .. . e !l 52 ... (10 G2 :;? 35 .oi C3 64 . fill 77 ... 76 3d .. 44 li!) ,2( n-. r.n Wore/en Apparently Hit By Missile from U.S. Jet SUBIC BAY, Philippines (AP) -- Emergency repairs on the U.S. guided missile frigate Worden began today after the ship limped into this American naval base. She apparently was hit by missiles accidentally 'The Worden was'believed hit by two missiles while on. station in the Gulf of Tonkin for air-sea rescue in support of U.S. aircraft flying raids' over North fired from American planes in crewman was killed anti nine the Gulf of Tonkin Sunday. Workmen scrambled over the 533-foot-long frigate repairing hundreds of shrapnel holes that laced the deck, the bridge, outside electronic gear'and the su- rerslructurc. Bright floodlights vere set up so work could go m at night. Apollo Heads for Moon Orbit "Industrial Education." Arts and Career Eaton District Asks Help in Accountability The Re-2 Local Accountability Committee met Monday, April 17, and plans for the coming C o m m u n i t y Survey were discussed. In order to comply with the Accountability Act, patrons of all parts of the district -are needed for Community Survey and committee work. All persons wishing to help are urged to altcnd Hie next meeting which will be held at 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 24, at the Eaton Elementary Cafeteria. AP) -- The Apollo 16 astronauts, firmly in the grip of lu- lar gravity, snapped pictures f their eratered target today and sped on toward an afternoon orbit of, the moon. The problems of flaking ainl, .a locked guidance sys- em, plumbing troubles, a baiting dock latch and a faulty radio antenna were behind them and their spaceship was tuned up and running smoothly. John.W. Young, Charles M. Duke Jr., and Thomas K. Mat- igo seeethed deep within the oday to begin their own coun- down for the engine firing that vould thrust them into orbit to tart six days of scientific ad- ·enture in the vicinity of the moon. In midmorning, about 17,900 niles from that alien world, ·tellingly used a camera equipped with special film and "ilters to t a k e - p i c t u r e s of the noon. They were not ordinary totir- st snapshots, but scientific ihotos to obtain information on he lunar atmosphere and radiation emitted from the surface.. "The sun is very, very close o the moon and it's difficult to wresight on the moon," Mat- Stork Express Born at Weld County General Hospital: To Mr, and Mrs. Lyle W. Myhre, 1744 8lh Ave., a daughter, on Wednesday, April 19. To M r . - a n d Mrs,. Donald A. Macfarlane, 521 N. 35th' Ave., a daughter, on Wednesday April 19. Born to Mr. and Mrs. Dave Goodman, 3314 W. 6th St. Road, a son, on Monday, April 17, at I? o u d r e Hospital in Valley Memorial Fort Collins. The ia!iy weighed 7 Ibs., 5 oz., and has been named Jason Paul. Rubber Record Likely WASHINGTON - World-wide use of n a t u r a l rubber will reach a record 6.9 billiea pounds in 972, experts predict, compared vilh 1371's 6.6 billion pounds. The United Stales is expected o use 1.3 billion pounds, 2 per cent over last year. THE FAMILY CIRCUS Hil Kciinc clcly New York, do ii' Okla. Cily, tidy I'iiilnd'pliiii. dear I ' l i n u n i x , clear P i t t s b u r g h , clear IVIiind Ore., clear IVIamI Me., cldy Rapid Cily, snow Kichnimi;!. cle;ir J R I . Louis, cldy .Sail I,;ikr, smiw San Frnii., clear S u n l t l c , cldy Spokane, clear Tampa, cldy Washington, cldy Alamnsii, cloudy litt S3 112 Oil 70 ii no 53 7f 52 5G 31 50 41 35 32 1)1 57 S3 87 -10 33 G l 5-1 52 3!) -10 27 fil 73 74 51 CO 33 .58 'Grandma, can I borrow a bile of your cake?" l.'iinon Cily, ovcrcastGO 41 Cheyenne, Wyo., fog 42 30.01 Colo Snrgs, cloudy 59 35 .... Craig, cloudy · 58 30 .._ Crook, overcast 52 38 ... Denver, snow · 57 26 T Fleming, overcast 55 34 Ft. Collins, for .49 35.03 ( i r f i n d .Juncln, clear Ii9 43 La.liuilii, cloudy 67 41 Lamar, cluudy 70 37 Lcadville, clear 1 26 Pueblo, cloiuly fi2 41 Scilgwick, overcast 47 35 'iiiHii-!, cloudy 71 4(i Art Teacher At Eaton Wins Study Grant Manuel Jimine/, art direclor of Ihi! lic-2 Eaton Schno District, has been informed by : h e Board of Foreign Scholarships, Department ol Health,"Education and Welfare :hat he has been selected for Fulbright-llays g r a n t to aarticipate in the 1972 summer seminar for American teachers of art in Italy. A p p l i c a t i o n for this seminar was open to all art teachers and professors nationwide. The seminar, sponsored jointly by Ihc Institute of Art History o [ho University of Rome and the Calcognifia Nnzionnle (Nationa Offhrc of Prints), will afford the p a r t i c i p a n t s an opportunity to study first hand monuments am works of art in the environment in which Ihcy were produced. The seminar will last six weeks and will be a travel-study throughout Italy. sary to await an examination of the fragments to rule out the possibility of hostile origin." ' A Navy spokesman refused to comment on the damage, which appeared fairly minor, or to District Parents To/Meet An organizational meeting of "Concerned Parents' of^School District Six," composed. of parent-teacher groups,- .will.'.be hold at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in .he First United Presbyterian Church. All parents in'District Six are inviled. ' · Vietnam, the Navy said. Onelsay when the frigate would be injured, one seriously. "At the time the Worden was hit," the Navy announcement complex electronic gear. The said, "both attack and support were also present in the vicinity of the Worden, it was neces- able to return to duly. Naval sources hinted that the most serious damage was to Worden, which left Long Beach, aircraft were in the vicinity of Calif., in October, carries two the ship. Since high-speed Terrier surface to air missiles. North Vietnamese surface craft The Terrier is a 27-foot missile powered by two solid-fuel rockets. SPACE CENTER, Houston fingly reported. But he said he was able to complete the assignment despite the brightness. . The moon took gravitational control of Apollo 16 at 12:07 a.m. when, the astronauts passed through a so-called "twilight zone'-' in which the gravitational influence of the earth and moon is equal. They were 205,443 miles from home and 38,893 miles from the noon. When Apollo 16 crossed this invisible line, the moon won the gravitational tug-of-war and the spaceship's speed accelerated after slowing from 24,500 to 1,COO miles an hour on the long outward journey from the earth. CU Campus Bombing Investigation Begins BOULDER, Colo. (AP) Boulder police, University of ; Colorado police and U.S. Trcas-j ury Department agents began an investigation Tuesday of a! pre-dawn bombing on the uni- 1 versity campus that caused an estimated $500 damage. CU officials .said an apparent dynamile bomb was tossed through the window of the university motor pool garage on the east campus, breaking windows and shattering windshields of parked vehicles. Campus police chief John Towle said he didn't know whether the bombing was con- Marc Engemeon Returns From £ Washington Trip Marc Engemoen, a Greeley Central High School junior, has recently returned from the Presidential Classroom for Young Americans held in Washington, D.C. The classroom is held .each year wilh high school students participating from all 50 states and from the territorial possessions of the United States. Students are selected for their interest in American history and governmental processes. Engemoen attended the sixth session and received financial help from various service organizations and clubs in the Greeley area. He will now begin a tour of these organizations' to speak on his experiences. nectcd to a demonstration the school Monday by Chicano students. About 350 Mexican-American students from Boulder, Greeley and Denver participated rally at Central Park and a demonstration in front of Regent Hall, CD's administration building. At the rally, the CU motor pbol was sharply criticized by Richard Falcon, assistant director of the United Mexican- American Students Educational Opportunity Program, who on probation. Marc Engemoen Manuel Jlmlncz SHERWIN- WILLIAMS We're More Than A Paint Store WE'RE A TURNPIKE WITH AN EXPRESSWAY TO SAVINGS! All roads lead to your Sherwin-Williams Store for a very special sale on Armstrong Vinyl Flooring. All first-grade material. No seconds or remnants.; m strong Vinyl Flooring SALE ENDS APRIL 8th CONSTANTINE Styling WHITE. A VOCADO, GOLD, BUHL CASTILIAN' CUSHIONED VINYL FLOOR High-Style sheet vinyl with vinyl foam cushion in two popular styles. Cushioning layer offers a comfortable feeling and quietness under-foot. Tough... easy to keep clean. PLAZA DEL SOL Styling PLUM, DELFT BLU£, AVOCADO, BOLD, tEATHCR ARAPAHOE Styling LOMA BEIGE. BIANCA WHITC, VALLE GRCEN. RIO BLUE. ANTIOUA GOLD *TM, Aimsliong Coik Co. SANTA CRUZ' VINYL CORLON' Smart, distinctive, inexpensive. A floor that combines beauty, durability and easy care. Arapahoe styling is random vinyl chip design. Gives floor distinctive appearance. Gaucho styling is bold, Spanish giillo design. You will be amazed that a floor like Santa Cruz could be priced so low. GAUCHO Styling WHITE BCIGC, GOLD. WHITE GRKH, RED, WHITE Bit/? EXPERT INSTALUTIOM AVAILABLE SHERWIN-WILLIAMS QUALITY PAINTS AT EVERY PRICE 708 EIGHTH AVENUE MON..FR-..7:30A.M..6P. M; ; G R E E L E y ( SAT.8:oo-s:oo OPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY COLORADO WlUIAMS J CHM6E ACCOUNT

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