Las Cruces Sun-News from Las Cruces, New Mexico on April 15, 1951 · Page 4
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Las Cruces Sun-News from Las Cruces, New Mexico · Page 4

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Las Cruces, New Mexico
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Sunday, April 15, 1951
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PAGE FOOT .v.^,,.;..,.:^ ' LAS'CBUCES (N. M.) SUN-NEWS. Sund»y Mcwnlnj, AprU 15. 1IS1 Las Cn««s Son-News Founded jln'lllt);. publinhHil dally, except SutuMay--weekday afternoons and Sunday mornings--by the Sunshine Presi,' inc., at 241 N.' Water St.V Las "Crucefi," N. M. Entered at l^na Cruces po.ltoffice as second-class matter. Stanley Gallup, Advertising Manager Orville K. Priestley, Editor and Publisher National Advertising Representative: Inland Newspaper neprescnla lives. Inc., Chicago. New York, St. Ixiuls, Kansas City, Omaha, Atlanta. Memberjpr the Associated Press. The Associated Press Is entitled exclusively to the use for reputllcatlon of all local news printed in this newspaper, as well as all AP news dispatches. TELEPHONE 33 This newspaper Is a member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations. Ask for a copy of our latest A. B. C. Report- siving audited fncts and figures about our circulation. A.B.C. r- Au'dit.Bureiu of Circulations FACTS as a moaiure ol Advertising Value SUBSCRIPTION RATES: By carrier in Las Ciucca and surburhan areas, 18c per week or 7IJC per month; by motor route delivery in Dona Ana county, SS.fiO per year or.SBc per month. Hy mall In New Mexico 7f,c per month or $7.50 per year. Outside of State 85c per month or $8.50'per year. ;Mail subscriptions are payable in 'advance. The Right Influence Wo can always find excuses or reasons or we can always justify our positions and our stands. We can do this in making donations if we want to get out of making them. We can do it when we do not want to do a p a r t i c u l a r task or job we arc requested lo do. It is like many other things, but we can always find time to do the things we want to do or we can find money to pay for the things we really and truly want. · lint as a group and as a people one of the best jobs we do for giving reasons and excuses concerns our religion or our failure lo attend church or to be affiliated with any church. Most of us go along in this life we live, those not actively . a t t e n d i n g church, and get along u n t i l we reach a crisis in our life! When tragedy strikes; when sorrow arrives; when we need only the help that He can give us--we seek out the church. Yet perhaps for years we have never gone to church; we have not participated in church programs; we have not assisted w i t h our ability or talent or with our means. But .sooner or later the day and the time comes when we t u r n to the church. II is regrclabie, of course, t h a t we have not and do not reali/c t h a i we w i l l need the church. The fact is that we noed the church every day of our life, not just when sorrow, tragedy or some great problem confronts us. Many do realize this and long before that day of need arrives, and they do something about it. , ' · " ,, , , . , ,. The u. S. Elllhth Armv saiil tile IJul we are told t h a t f u l l y M percent of our population RK , H wm , pl ' minR llp s t f r r apvmi . do not have any cliurch a f f i l i a t i o n and do not attend any church .'ii'rvicps. Most of UK realize thai only aboul half of the 1 average church membership ntlends services regularly and actively participates in church programs. Wo know one church in our city which has over 10.10 mi'nibers; All of them could not attend services at one time because the church could not accommodate them. But most (if them attend more or less.. ,: . . . · This is probably true of other churches in. our community-. ·'· · ' . ' . . · , . , ' - . ' " ' · ·- '' · ' - ' i 13ut, theix 1 is n place .for you a n d - a - n e e d ' f o r you · in the church prop'rams' of this community. · We have never knoy/n n church which-dld not need more good church workers. Churches need workers and teachers in their. Sunday schools; they need them in the young people's groups; they need them in tho church women's organization; they need them actively in the church programs. Every church needs members who set a good example; who emphasize what the church affiliation can mean to them; who can help convince others what Ihe church can do in our own community anri in o u r . n a t i o n and in the world. As we have pointed out before, churches are the greatest influence for'good in this community or any. other community. Dul that Influence is limited by the church members, by their work and'.efforts, by their influence. Tile I n f l u e n c e - o f the-church is only ;\s strong, as the membtrs''mrike It and desire It to:he. And we have those church mornbe'rs v y h o ^ a r c not milch influence in our 'com- ii)unily. · " . ' · ' · · · · , . ' ' - , ' . - ' ' ·When',the. majoi'ity of the .members: of:this community are members.of a :qluircli.. Di'c church of thoir Awn 'clioicc, and when;wl tire.working';ha.nd'iri hanfi,. the..influence the church catvh.lve.wilj'be denrly'sliown'rtnd clearly'fell.' , There js.ho fjuestio'li bill-what-tlle'chilrch heeds every individual iuld thc-re 'is ivo/cjuctiUpli'but/whul sooner.or Inter every Individual needs the church.;.' i ' ' , ' - ! '. ·· N o w ' f s illiLvtlmLvto'iiikure'-. Uie'chlirch bein^.lieVe'wiuin you need It.'.'·'''·'. .. , v ' - · · ·'.':.'·''· : .'" -!.· · ·. · ·' : · ' .' Thobei Schoiil tfighifc. "''.;'·'. : ;\: : ·. -., . ''}'''· ' ! '. : y- One' of- tlic topics-'. w'h'ic)i ; i;c.cui'vcU' cohsiderhble i.-jilphtipn al the'recent incelljif; of scliooj'.'ftflielnls a| lii'e Cliicago Nor.th Central Association meeting Wjis.Uie question of, jcljoul-events held on schooj -nights!·" ' : .' . i ! , ' Schools reprrsentod h( this session Colih'd this a, common problem and all agreed to.endeavor and to'seek to hold.these events In so'tar as possible ,to .the-weekend nights instead of holding them during the week. ;' ' Thai, of course, has always been a real 'problem here. It usually finds too mnny contlicls with athletic events or with programs being held in Las Crtices. ., There just,Isn't sufficient nights during the week for all of the various cveiits being.hold. But parents have voiced considerable concern aboul things being held on school nights because it takes the youngnt«r« 'out and awiiy from home. Frequently they need to do a lillle studying. Teachers also encounter this problem with their pro- grains, Hieir.entertainments and inc various events. During the coming year it it understood that, .in so far as possible Ihe athletic events as well as' other school 'pro- · (·i'.ims ai'f to he booked or scheduled for Friday or Saturday .Considerable aid or help can be given Ihc'schools' if tl public, in booking programs, shows, entertainments and other events will schedule these for other nights than Friday or Saturday. ) In many inrtlaiices, of course, this can be done and it'will bo n real assistance to the schools, Jn fuel, H will help make these two nights, Friday and Saturday, free for the school programs'. "'· , It' has been necessary on a number of occasions in (he past to book cage games on'nlghts during the week. In some instances'this has meant trips away-from home and has re- 1 suited hi the youngsters .returning late to their.homes. . · Jl may not be necessary to eliminate Ihls nil together but every effort Is to be liiuoV to reduce it as much as possible and to try ind schedule school affairs and school event's for other than school 'nlghls. , . Recently a, school piny was slated tor Friday night and It was postponed until ft Monday night In order to.avoid conflict .with- another play being presented here, The public can help by scheduling events on pthor than Friday and Saturday nights. OUR VERSATILE HUMPTY DUMPTY ' · Korean War (Continued from Page One) the l'20-mlle front in North Ko- KfitunL'ty hut counted their gains in yards. Id. f!cn. Jamcfi A. Van Fleet arrived Saturday in Korea and tooU over command of Allied Ground from Lt. Gen. Matthew B. Hilly-way. ;itl|fwiiy Li-iivi'H Ridgway left KOOII n f t e r and landed iifU-r dfirlt at Tokyo'.s Manda Airfield. Saturday U. N. troops were smashing northward. American ironps on the central front drove Reds from one of the hey hill ninascH nnuth of the Hwa- chon reservoir. South Korean north ami northwest of Yon- onfi on t h n western front. Tlic Communists battled desperately for d o m i n a t i n g ridge positions. Van Fleet, taking: over liin now command, told war corresponilents: . "Thin IB a grent honor and tremendous responsibility, I shall give my bent- to merit the confidence, both of my superiors nnd of my juniors." Ridjrway told reporters in Tokyo, he would press for a n , p a r l y Japanese Peace t r e a t y nnd "work toward the completion of the masterly task already largely accomplished under the consummate leadership and guidance of Gen- crnl MacArthur," General To Talk (Continued from page one) would accept, but the timing of such an address still is uncertain. Truman Ajiprovrs Mr. Truman, who fired MacAr- Uiur Wednesday because of the general's refusal to go along;.with Presidential policies in the Far Wast, said 'in a While House ntatc- meni last night. "I am happy to icarn from Spenker Ilayburn that Congress in planning to invite General MacArtliur to address the members of both Houses I regard it as fitting that Congress bestow this honor on one uf our great military men." Chairman Russell ( D - G a j , whoso Senate Armed Services committee 1.111111.11 ituit.it 11 troops stabbed north of Jnje, 10 miles southeast lias i n v i t t i t l M a c A i t h u r to testify of YanifKii. against stiff reals- '» HTMHntfs beginning Wednesday, tance called the President's gesture MiM-t 'opposition "magnanimous Tin: U. S. Eljjhth Army said HIP Kul Svnulur When-y of Nebraska, the Kf-jnibhn I In. leader, Spokesman Describe Air : Lofis- In Korea AsGrcalesl In War WASHINGTON, April 14 (^Pi -- · An Air Force Hpolcesumn snkl today the dumnpc irceived in Tlnivs- biittle of TJ-2!) iKHiibi'i^ and Jet "flKhtovs. *a« Knnitcr thnn in uny 'previous. Korean air I'iphls, But hn'enlphastzod tlic'damns't! in not cohsldprod heavy. .·TwoJJ-ilO.s .were lost and fcyeral wM'e ihtniajred in n h.i^lle a'nn(.* tht 1 " Yalii-r.ivi-r boun^nty :_ nf NorUi Konutiiirid, Miu'.r hiii-ia, an a!r fence hrlpfliig, offioei- sai'l yei.leidoy. Tli'o ilo$n of two planes and the " " " ' i-J forc'e of '32 could not be Uiid 1 -an heavy, the spukos- jlUi;; today, uHpccinUy wlu-n had n different view. " A l t e r tlie general wa.'i iiluppcd in . the face, the public reaction which followed made iL impoijsihle for the President to do anything else," Wherry told a reporter. Church Meeting ^ (Continued from- page one) Turner are district host and host- nsti. Committee Members 'Serving on hostess society committees arc Mrs. L. S. Kurt?., president of the. Las Cniros Women's Society; Mrs. Hudson Murrell, music; Carl Jacobs, choir director; Mr.-). Kenneth lender, Mrs. Turner, organiatii; Mrs. A. V. McCombs, Mrs. Paul Riggins. registration. Airs. W. E. Flint, hospitality; Mi'H. Allan D'uilman, courtesy; Mrti. L. F. Pratt, transportation; .Mrs. Jcsslo Gentry, puljlicily; Mrs. Bui ford Harris, flowers; Mrs. 1C. I.. Rau'ling', Fellowship Tea. Mrs. C. K. Conlco. conference luncheon; Mrs. Carl Uiw. executive committee luncheon; Mrfi.iW. r, Thorjic, executive committeii dinner; and'Mrs. I... l... J^vans, Mrs. Frank GrcutliouRi 1 . Mv«. I. J. Ay- ei'H.'Mr.s. F. O. Shutterr, Mrs, L S. Ku'rt/, and Mrs. '12. J. ir..ir,cs. program committee. compared with ."World Win- bombing missions. Some'Of tlio damaged j ot" "jjcvonil"' nut of u turning to liasii n f t e r Hussi.iu M1G- itia stnicli, thorn · fftrrictl Ui:;u well as. wounded, the said. - D A I L Y C R O S S W O R D H. · ACUOSS I.Of ulolic ISlH'llnml Is.) 11, SHU scurf (En I.) " nf'rudliiin l. r i. Coi'citiony lit. Typt- (if · (Kt-lnllcil Ilicrp IK. Miiiulni-ln ' lea · 20. Mul.'iyan Illllll ·Jl, Inrlliullon n r n f n u l l - vi'iil iRedl.l 2:1. Stnllis · (Hut.) , 'J7.Tuun lUplj;.! .10. IMnranl :IV K l l l f d . · "'.lisMiYlOr.) :iS. Tivorn · ;io. ltn\ills 4). 1'nvlicli- M sllli iliv^nilft · ·10. Moniis 47. AniirlKiicnl inftliiniiU - · (Asia) 48. All cxjiort IMiWN · J . T f n n l a · nli'oko y. Coin ' iSwpil.) 3. lulmiil (\V. I.) ·I. winc-lllic r». Covt r with new top r,. Rciuih CiiutUn.-! inhhr.) S.Opruitlc niPlculy 10. Close, ti.sn M. Timber fortllioniion 2B. U-vol , 20. Sfitrlicil ·ja.jNmiw . .·il.Hillsnl w.'ilosoil · clulh .",4. City CAla.) ::0. Ciralr :i7. Girl'H iittinu linwlt's t-ycp :!S. Morninf; 4:5. Devour '·ir,.\VosL Africa Associated Press- Wages Campaign To BeiterRepori NEW YORK, April 14 tffi -Do you find your newspapers more interesting these days? And .ire. the news reports you get over tho radio more informative thnn formerly? * . ' · Frank J. Strzel, general manager of Lhu Associated Press, noted in his annual report today thiiL there has been behlml-tlie-scenes activity by newspapers and radio groups Lo improve service to ihe reading and listening public, , The public hasn't been generally aware of the campaign, hut, it includes improved writing techniques and a broad program of stories which give better background and explanation tu spot news developments. Starzel said content of the Associated Press news report IK being .·itiidird in and effort "lo find fields in which the report does ;iot come up to-the volume and quality justified by reader interest." ' . T h e AP, worldwide news cooperative, serves 2,788 newspapers and radio stations in the United States and nearly 3,200' units" in 7.'J other countries. . St;iizel'.s report was mailed to Associated Press members in ad- Nuzum (Continued from Page 1) many newsmen from over New Mexico and Pennsylvania' due to the notoriety of the case and prominence of the .accused football player. Actual district court trlal^of Ui athlete will be held in May* if his arraignment on murder charges is upheld by tint preliminary hearing, before Justice of Pcura Dan T. Price., School Sports By The Associated I'ress Rollrgi!' liasehiill Cofm-atlo A1I D, New Mexico S. Eastern New Mexico 23, St. Michael's (Santa Fe) 10. College Calf New Mexico G, Colorado A_£M 0. Tennis Colorado AM 5, New Mexico -1, Track Arizona State (Tempe) 111, New Mexico 20. Texas Western 79 2/3, New Mexico ASM 42 1/3, New Mexico Western 30. High School Rasehull Highland 17. Cuba 4. ^ vam-R of the association'^ annual muuling in New York April 23. . .Personal Loans . . . Clillton Loan Insurance Co. Liidics (.lasual Type - Wedge Sole Play Slices - Many colors, styles -to choose from. Reg. $3.49 and §3.98 . . . Ladies brown lies lo lots . . .Dress Type Shoes - Black, while, and iwo.-loiies - Sliorl runs, .Val$7.50 - AA lo C widths. Jjroken Ladies Sandals and Strap Type Wedges Odd lots. These slices formerly sold t'or S2.98 lo S3.98'-'.. . . Children's Sho(.v - Hi-lops, Oxfords, Sandals Dir?s Shoes. Values lo §3.49. INCORPORATED Ch»rJ«r No. 7720 Bii«iWT*-pii»iid,il«.' 1 1 REPORT OF CONDITIOK-OF.: -THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK ' . .; . OF'LAS CRUCEJ5, IN THE STATE OF NEW MEXICO. AT:.THE CLOSE OF BUSINESS ON APRIL 9TH, 1951. PUBLISHED IN RE-, SPONSE TO CALL MADE BY 'COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, UNDER SECTION 5211, U.' S; REVISED STATUTES. . · - . · ; . . · ' : ·.. ' : ASSETS . : ' .; . ··'-/" Cash, balances with other banks, including. . . 'reserve balance, and cash items in process · . · ... · _ . : . . · of collection ... ......... '. .................... :.: ................ '. ....... "$1,407,104.97 ' United States Government obligations, direct .. - · . - ; and guaranteed ............ ·. ................. .......'./. ..... '........ 2,414-700.00 Obligations of States and political subdivisions' 336,000.00 Corporate stocks (including $6,000.00 stock of-. ' : : ' '. ' Federal ftescrve' bank) ..... :.....! ....... . ........ : ....... :! .. 6,000.00 Loans and discounts (including No overdrafts) 1,061,975.12 Bank premises owned ?50,000.00, furniture and ' . '. 1 ; ; . fixtures $9,500.00 ......................... ............. .,..:. ' 59,500,00 (Bank premises owned are subject to No · . liens not assumed by bank) . · TOTAL ASSETS , .......,:.... $5,285,280.09 LIABILITIES . .-" ''-' .' Demarrd deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations $4,407,237.28 Time deposits of individuals, partnerships, and ., crporalions '. 37,767.43 Deposits of United States Government (includ- ' .; ing postal savings) 5,552.76 Deposits of States and political subdivisions .... 487,955.95 Oilier deposits (certified and cashier's checks, etc.) 46,015.57 TOTAL DEPOSITS $4,984,528.99 ' ." '' · CAPITAL ACCOUNTS ' TOTAL LIABILITIES ' $4,984,528.99 Capital Stock: Common stock, total par $100,000.00 ' 100,000.00 Surplus '..- 100,000.00 Undivided profits 3.0,751.10 Reserves '. .'. 70,000.00 TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS .'. ·. $ 300,751.10 TOTAL LIABILITIES AND . . . . . . . . CAPITAL 'ACCOUNTS $5,285,280.09 MEMORANDA · ' Assets pledged or assigned to secure liabilities and lor other purposes $ 766,300.00 Stale of. New Mexico, County of Dona Ana, ss: 1 I, Stanley T. Alcott, cashier of the above-named bank, do solemnly swear that the above statement is true to the. best of my knowledge and 'belief. . ' STANLEY T. ALCOTT, Cashier Correct--Attest: i Sworn to and subscribed before me J. J. ARAGON, A. I. KELSO, 'II. B. HOLT, Directors (SEAL) ..' this 14th day of April, 1951 ELIZABETH N. HAINES, Notary Public. My commission expires Oct/8,. 1952 HEPOHT OF C.ON '. '·-· .*·'· Slit* No': 47 MESILLA VALLEY BANK of Las Cruces in the State of Naw .Mexico ai ihe cloM'pf business on April 9. 1951. : ASSETS Cash, balances with other banks, including re-. serve balances, and cash items in process of . . 'collection ......................................... , ....... ................. $'400,332.71 United Stales Qovcrnment obligations, direct .; ,, and guar'anleed ................. . ........................... ' ........ 1,791;192.2G Loans and discounls (includhr r $263.59 over-. ' drafts)' ... ..... ' .................. : .......... '....'.,.'· 398,607.99 Bank premises ov.'ned $none, furniture and fix- 1 ' .-'·*.' lures $5,250.00 ...................... "... ....... ..... : ....... . ' "..5,25P'.06 (Bank premises owned-are subject to $none V v 1 .' 1 ;.'. liens not assumed by bank) '. ' . ' , ' · '.' i. ··''.,'', Other assets ...................................... M'.. ._..'..'..' ..... .'.-...' · , '.'.B.ivs TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES . / . ; .;·:;·; Demand deposits of- individuals, partnerships, -...',;.'.·. and corporations . : '...'.....,:.-.....',:....$2;139i8ifc83 Time deposits of individuals', partnerships and ;i :.l,,? . corporations : :. .'OfSOjl.OO Dopos'! if United States Government (including . ' ; ''-"'- ! ' . . . . . i Deposits ot Slates and political subdivision's-.-. 200,314.43 I Other dep-rits (certified and 'officers' checks,' . · -,'i - elc.) ..,, -..; ; -7,571.97 TOTAL DEPOSITS .'. $2,417,019.97' " :";··.·_ TOTAL LIABILITIES (not including sub- . ,' : '':i ·. ordinated obligations shown below) $2,41^0*19.97 CAPITAL ACCOUNTS Capital" .....' : :....'...., i Surplus Undivided profits Reserves (and retirement account for. preferred capital) '· t .". ,.- "....'....'. . 2b,o()p.0o 28,3381.12 .25,do6.0P TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS . ; . $ 178,3^9.12 ' · TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL' · ~~ ACCOUNTS '. $2,595,389.09 . *This bank's capital consists of: Common s'tock with total'par value of $100,000.00 MEMORANDA : Assets pledged or assigned to secure liabilities and for other purposes : $ 780,000^' We E. L. Heath, President and'W. H. Gwynne. Cash' of the above-named bank to solemnly swear that the 'abbi statement is true, and that it -fully and correctly represcm the true state of the several matters herem contained\n\ set forth, to the best of our knowledge a.id 'belief. . , ' ' E. L. KEATH, President W. H. G\VYNNK, Cashier ' Correct--Attfcst: PERRY W. BARKER, ' ' ' ' ' ' W. H. GWYNNE, E. L: HEATH, L. E. GWATLEY, ARTHUR K BARKER, Directors State of New Mexico, County of Dona Ana,.ss: Sworn to and subscribed before me this 12th day of April, 1051. and I hereby certify that I am not an offic'dr or director of this bank. t : (SEAL) R. R. POSEY, Notary Public. My commission expires Jan. 12, 19S4

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