Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado on February 26, 1976 · Page 3
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Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado · Page 3

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Greeley, Colorado
Issue Date:
Thursday, February 26, 1976
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Page 3
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Thurs., Kcb. 2C, 197C GREELEY (Colo.) TK1BUNE jl Bundy testifies he never saw girl he's accused of kidnaping By DAVID BRISCOE AstociitedPrns Writer SALTLAKE CITY (API-Abduction defendant Theodore R. Bundy took the witness stand today and testified that, prior to courtroom encounters, he had never even scon the girl he is charged with kidnaping. He said he spent the evening she was kidnaped'at home and did not go to the mall where Carol DaRonch, now 19, was abducted on Nov. 8, 1974, by a man pretending to be a policeman. But he acknowleged (hat he lied to police officers when arrested last August on a charge of possession of burglary tools and evading an officer. Bundy said he did not want to admit to them he had been smoking marijuana, so he said he told them he had been to a movie. Bundy, who has remained silent on details of the case since he was charged last Oct. 2 with kidnaping Miss DaRonch, took the stand on the fourth day of his trial. If convicted of the charge of aggravated kidnap, he could draw a prison sentence of from five years to life. Bundy, a Tacoma, Wash., resident formerly active in Washington state politics, was attending law school at the University of Utah when arrested. Under questioning by defense attorney John O'Connell, Bundy was asked about his activities on Nov. 8. He said he was at Cottonwood shopping mall, several miles from where Miss DaRonch was abducted at Fashion Place Mall--earlier in the day and spent the rest of the evening at home after having mechanical trouble with his car. He said he recalled his whereabouts because he had to take his car to a service station near Cottonwood Mall. Miss DaRonch identified Bundy earlier in the trial as the man who abducted her, getting handcuffs onto one of her arms and threatening her with a pry- bar. The man had showed her a badge and got her into his car by saying he was investigating the burglary of her car outside Fashion Place Mall, she said. Asked about Miss DaRonch, Bundy said he had "no other contact with her" other than courtroom contact. He spoke in soft tones and In Colorado Territory .. 100 years ago We understand Capt. Boyd has been running his sorghum mill again, and quite a fair article of syrup has been made. I t seems t h a t considerable sorghum has been raised this year by some of our farmers. -Tribune, Oct. 11, 1876. Complaints are made of horses being turned loose among the farms over the river, and much damage has been done in tire cornfields. This should be stopped. If the owners cannot afford to feed their horses, they certainly have no right to turn them loose on their neighbors crops. -- Tribune, Oct. 11, 187B. A young man has been arrested in New York for sleeping in a standing position. He would stand on the strecl four hours at a stretch, with his eyes closed, and not move a muscle. It is hereditary. His father was a policeman. -Tribune, Oct. 1C, 1876. B. F. Marsh has made some excellent stereoscopic views of our school building. --Tribune, Oct. 25. 1876. Weld County Centennial-Bicentennial : j Calendar Feb. 27-28 -- 3 p.m., Frasicr, "Paint Your Wagon." Feb. 29 7 p.m., B u t l e r Hancock Hall, Centennial- Bicentennial religious heritage Golf Shoes Need Repair? If you need a new spike or have a comfortable pair of shoes you want made Into golf shoes, bring them to us. We Can Do The Job For You. SALZMAN'S 911 8th Ave. and SHOE HEALER Greeley Mall program with Paul Harvey. March 2 -- 1 0 a.m. to noon and 1 to 2:45 p.m., UNC Library, autograph party, Gary M o r g a n , a u t h o r of "Sugar T r a m p : Colorado's Great Western Railway." March 2 -- 3 p.m., U N C Li bra ry, Edwa rd Kca rns, program. "The H u m a n i t i e s , History and Meaning of the Bicentennial." March fi - 7 p.m.. La Salle M i d d l e School, auction of donated items from townspeople, proceeds to centenneil- bicentennial projects. March 9 - 3 p.m.. U N C Library, Kay M c E l r o y , program and exhibit. "Fossils of Weld County." March 13 -- 7:30 p . m . , Briggsdalc school auditorium, adult talent show, "Hats Off to America." March 22 -- Eaton School auditorium, awards ceremony for design of town flag. AT LONG JOHN SILVER'S. KIDS CAN EAT LIKE PIRATES. And it costs only , peanuts! There are three special ./ dinners just for kids. Plus free pirate souvenirs! "Long- JohnSUver's SEAFOOD SHOPPES Bring ihc whole crew, to the fun thing (odo. 2435 W. Tenth Street (Across from "Ted Chefs") frequently could not be heard in the back of the courtroom. He appeared relaxed and smiled at times when discussing the troubles with his car. Bundy denied he had a badge but said he did have handcuffs which he found in a dump. He said he had never tried them on anyone. A set of handcuffs, a pry bar and other tools were in the car when Bundy was arrested Aug. 16 by an officer who found him driving through a residential district. Officers said that arrest was instrumental in Bundy being connected to the DaKonch case. Bundy testified he had been smoking marijuana and tried to get the marijuana smoke out of the car and to throw out anything connected with it. "I'll be damned if I was going to be caught with that stuff in the car," said Bundy. He said he was "frightened, paranoid. 1 couldn't describe to .you the feeling." He said he knew he had done something illegal. He said he only told his attorney the full story about lying to the officers within the past couple of weeks when he realized it did not have anything to do with the current case against him. He said it was his habit to drive around until he was tired. "As is my habit, I drive until I got tired, then...go home and go to bed," said Bundy. He said it was not generally known among friends in the Seattle area that he smoked marijuana. He said some in Salt Lake would be shocked by it and others would not. He said he has always kept a prybar in his car, along with a complete set of tools. Testimony Wednesday came from acquaintances who said Bundy never wore the type of patent leather shoes Miss DaRonch's abductorsupposedly wore. As part of her description of her kidnaper, Miss DaRonch told police that her kidnaper had worn patent leather shoes. But, James Dunn, a neighbor of Bundy who said he met the defendant a couple of months before the abduction, was asked by Bundy's defense attorneys if it wasn't true that he had never ever seen Bunciy in patent leather shous. "Yeah, that wouldn't fit Ted's Miss DaUonch told invcstiga- image, as 1 knew it," Dunn tors her abductor threatened said. her with a crowbar. He also said it was customary for Bundy to carry "all manner of tools and junk" in his 1%8 Volkswagen, saying Bundy was "equipped for any emergency on the road." Bundy was arrested last August in a suburban Salt Lake community and police said they found a crowbar and a pair of handcuffs in the car. Dunn said he had never seen handcuffs or a crowbar in the vehicle. | * * » * * * * * * » * * * * « : CHARTPAK : TRANSFER LETTERING '"SABachman's 'Cinque' friend tells plans for Patty Hearst By KICK DU BROW SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) Ulysses Hall was surprised when he received a phone call from his old friend, Donald "Cinque" DeFreeze. It was, says Ulysses, the renewal of a prison contact which led to Cinque's telling him of his plans to Use Patricia Hearst to help build the reputation of the Symbionese Liberation Army. Ulysses, a prisoner in San Joaquin County Jail, says he previously knew Cinque when both were inmates at the California Medical Facility at Vacaville. It was there, he adds, that they belonged to the Black Cultural Association. Ulysses says he was parolled in late 1973 and decided to get A LITTLE LEARV -THE OTHER ^RGHT ITOUTTO involved working with black churches. Some time after this, according to Ulysses, Cinque called and said he was out of prison, and they had a regular conversation in which his old friend "made me aware he was going to gel involved in a group." Ulysses says Cinque asked him if he wanted to join, and that he replied no -- that he could do more good working with churches and the community. At any rate, says Ulysses, Cinque told him he could contact him by posting specially worded messages on the bulletin board at Operation Reach in Oakland. Ulysses says he didn't do anything ;tl first. Then came April IS, 1J174, the day a San Francisco hank was robbed of $1U,GGO - the crime for which Miss Hearst is standing trial. Ulysses says he saw news of the robbery on television and heard that Cinque and Miss Hearst were among those involved. He decided to contact his former jail companion by following the bulletin Iward procedure. What Ulysses wanted to know, he says, is why Cinque would use a person worth millions in a $10,000 robbery. He also wanted to know why Cinque would take a person who was a comrade and "front her off when he could have sent her home" and still had access to her wealth. Ulysses explained at Miss Hearst's trial that the phrase "front her off" means to put her "in a position where she could gel killed, arrested, something bad." He thought it was "a funky robbery" and that Cinque "could've had a main line" to her money instead of making a fugitive out of her. Ulysses said Cinque called him at his mother's house a week or 10 days after he went through the bulletin board process. He said the SLA leader told him he had three alternatives with Miss Hearst: - Kill her. -- Send her home, which could endanger the SLA. -- "Put her in a position where she would become a part of them, a part of the group" so she would have (o look to the SLA for help and support. That,, says Ulysses, is what Cinque decided on. Ulysses says Cinque also indicated the SLA wanted Miss I Icarst to prove herself by taking part in the robbery, under threat of being shot if she did anything wrong. Pair riding to Alaska COFITEZ. Colo. (AP) Two Colorado men riding on horseback from Texas to Alaska in a bicentennial journey for several Elks lodges have arrived in southwestern Colorado. Tom David of Alamosa and Bill Kcker of Colorado Springs reached Cortez Thursday after completing 550 miles of their 4,- 250-milc journey by horseback. The pair have been averaging about 20 miles a day on their trip, which began in El Paso. Tex., and will end in Fairbanks, Alaska, in late July. 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