Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado on October 7, 1969 · Page 10
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Greeley Daily Tribune from Greeley, Colorado · Page 10

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Greeley, Colorado
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Tuesday, October 7, 1969
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Page 10
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Paire 10 GREELEY TRIBUNE Tats., Oct. 7, 196 Humorist Art Buchwald Will Speak Here Oct. 16 Called by Time Magazine "the most successful humorous columnist in the United States," Art Buchwald will lecture publicly at Colorado State College in the College Center ballroom on Oct. 16 at 8 p.m. In addition to his popularity as a syndicated columnist, Buchwald is also the author of many rib-lickling books, the Art Buchwald recent being "Have 1 Lied to You?" (1968), most Ever "Son of the Great Society." (1966), and ". . . And Then I Told the President" '(1965). As a performer he is heard on records, on TV, and before audiences all across the nation. His life, it would seem, is a conlinual "happening," although you might not gather that from the introduction to his latest book: "Art Bueliwald works small airless room on the lop of the Washington Monument. Subsisting on nothing but orange juice and black coffee, Buchwald writes his column in longhsnd on the backs of ol White House press : releases They''are then attached to tin legs of speedy pigeons and de livered to the 421 newspaper that- carry- his column lo every part of the civilized and un civilized world." Born in' Westchester am raised on Long Island,, he let lome in 1942 and-enlisted in tin Marines. There: he gained hi: early journalist' experience in the Pacific 'Theater,' editing hi company newspaper on Eniwc .ok, where he was stationed foi thi'ee and a half years. ' The University 'of Southern California welcomed Ms talents afler his discharge from ser vice. He was managing editor o the 'college humor magazine columnist for its paper am author 'of one of its variety shows. .Bucfiwald then went, to Paris as a student, and afler wards got a job on Variety. Early in 1949, he took a trial column to the editorial offices of the. European edition of the New York Herald Tribune. En "Paris After Dark," it was filled with off-beat tid-bits aboul Parisian night life. The edilors liked il. He was hired. By 1952, his column, by then called "Europe's Lighter Side,' was syndicated in the American press. Ten .years later, he moved his typewriler to Washington. He is 'now syndicated in over 400. newspapers throughout the U.S. and .the world: Married and the father of two girls'.andVboy-. Art Buchwald claims that his family is supposed lo supply him wilh two of his three.articles a week-or they go. . One fact remains indisputable. He is, in the words of Wal- cr Lippman, "one of the best satirists of our'time." PLAN CONTEST - Capt. Verne Einspahr (left) Grceley Fire Department, Gerald Christian (Cenler), principal of Jefferson Elementary School, and Darrell Wallisch, Slate Farm Regional Office, view a fire prevention chart while discussing a bulletin board contest on fire prevention being sponsored by the-Stale Farm Regional Office in Greeley's elementary schools. State - Farm will donate $300 worth of educational equipment for the winning classrooms. (Photo by Ron Stewart) N. Viets Deny Secret Talks With the U.S. PARIS (AP) -- A spokesmar or the North Vietnamese delegation lo the Paris peace talk ienied Monday thai there liac een any secret contacts be ween the United Stales and Ha )i. Referring to reports of such a ontrac'l', the spokesman de cribed.them'as "a maneuver o le Nixon administration in rying'tb elude Ihe demands o U.S. and world public opinion.' WASHINGTON ROUNDUP By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON (AP) - President Nixon's conduct of the will in Vietnam has taken on the same flawed style of formei President Lyndon B. Johnson, say members of a Quaker group who have huddled with a top administration policy advisor. "The Nixon administration has not been able to bring peace off as yet and is caught in a tragedy syndrome that trapped Lyndon Johnson," said one delegate who met Monday with presidential advisor Dr. Henry Kissinger. The Quakers, members of the American Friends Service Committee, met twice before with Kissinger and have sought a fourth meeting with Nixon's so- curity advisor. "I came away tremendously less optimistic today than 1 in May or July, said George Sawyer of Indianapolis. Adde Wallace Collelt of Cincinnati "It's a very chilling, distressing feeling." There was no comment from the White House on the meeting. but apparently weren't awed by "Bealle Power" Monday. When a man draped a banner bearing those words over Ihe railing of Ihe House visitors' gallery, he was hauled away and arrested y police. Capital Foot not* Capifol police responded Biggest Advance Since Seat Belts ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) Energy-absorbing 'steering columns arc "probably the higgcsl advance in auto, safety .since'the ap seal bell," a University of Michigan researcher has reported. Beret Case Pressure by Rivers Denied WASHINGTON (AP) - The White House denied today that Chairman L. Mendel Rivers, D- S.C., of the House Armed Services Committee pressured President Nixon into dropping murder charges against eight members of the Green Berets. Ronald L. Zicgler, press secretary, confirmed Ihat Rivers, as well as other members of Congress, discussed (lie Green Berets with Bryce Harlow, Nixon's congressional top aide, but lever met with the President di- ·ectly in the matter. "But 1 think I can say tills 'airly clearly, that at no time did Chairman Rivers indicate inything relating lo the House Armed Services Committee," ' WASHINGTON (AP) -- Theater owners say they will take the issue of pay television to the Supreme Court. A U.S. Court o Appeals last week authorized the Federal Communications Commission lo begin licensing pay television stations. Martin H. Newman, chairman of the National Association o Theater Owners Fight Pay T\ Committee said the decision wil be appealed "because we fee that the FCC ruling is legally incorrect and contrary to public interest." The association will seek court ruling prohibiting licens ing of pay television stations un til the Supreme Court acts on the appeal, he said. WASHINGTON (AP) - The government will write off claim of $71,795 againsl Ihe Southern Christian Leadership Conference for damage to a Washington park during the Poor People's Campaign if i gets $10,500, the Justice Depart ment says. Asst. Ally. Gen. William D. Ruckelshaus, chief of'Ihe civi division, said the reduced settle- menl was agreed upon during extensive negotiations with the SCLC. Capital Quote "Justices of the Supreme Court from this day forward must be able to stand the test of complete and honest disclosure before Senate confirmation can be anticipated. Judge Haynsworth's record will stand this test" Republican Sens. Roman Hruska of Nebraska and Marlow Cook of Kentucky. Anatomist, Donald Huelke said a study of more-than 800 fatal and nonfatal accidents over eight years has shown.that the energy-absorbing column makes from 'steering column impact rare. He noted thai this lype of injury formerly was the leading cause of death and serious injury to drivers. Huclke's research also concluded that laminated windshield glass, · installed in all 30SM966 American-built' cars, is "a Iremendmis safely faclor in reducing the seriousness of facial injuries.". Youthful View LONDON -- Secondary school children are being invited to name sites . in Britain which should be preserved or improved. Winners of Ihe contest, organized .by Shell Mex-BP and Valure Conservancy, the wild life organization, will go on a European lour. ilegler said. Time magazine reported in Fire Prevention Is Theme Of Bulletin Board Contest State Farm Insurance lias announced a bulletin board con test to,be conducted this week in elementary schools on fire prevcnlion. William Dye, regional fire manager for the company, slated Ihat each classroom for the First through sixth grades in Sreeley had been invited to participate. Each class will pre- oare a bulletin board display on ire prevention as a class iroject. ·Judging teams will compare each entry across the districl yith others at the same grade evel. Six winners will be selected, one for each grade. The six winning classrooms yill receive ?50 worth of educa- ional equipment of their own choosing from Slale Farm. Questions and Answers Q. I know that I am eligible or Medicare vcn though when I I may turn 65 continue .his week's issue that Rivers Jircatened to have three mem- oers of the Green 'Berets testify publicly before his committee unless the charges were dropped. ' The magazine said Rivers lold Harlow that he would "give three of the Berets a chance lo rebut all charges in public hearings before his committee." Ziegler also denied that Rivers had brought up the subject of the anliballistic missile authorial ion bill, then before the House, in his conversations with Harlow. "Harlow made il clear to me this was not part of the convcr- vorking. However, since I am covered by a group health in- urance program at work, do I eally need Medicare? A. Whether lo sign up foi fedicare is your personal dec! ion. Many group health plan, utomatically transfer senio ·nrkers to a special plan whicl upplements the benefits unde ledicare Paris A and B. Checl ,'ilh your personnel officer o nion represenlalive to find ou yours is such a plan befori ou make your decision. sation said. with Rivers," Zieglerj Manor Country Club in Rockville, Md., host the U.S. Junior amateur golf-championship in 1971. The 1970 Junior amateur is set for July 28-Aug. 1 at the Athens, Ga., Country "lub. Fresh Hearing Aid Batteries. Gilbert Rexall Stores. LEVI'S Headquarters THE 5TOCKMAN Oct. 5-11 is National Fire Prevention Week. Slate Farm is cooperating with the Greeley Fire Department and other concerned companies arid organizations in promoting fire prevention. "We felt a contest at the elementary level would be well received," Dye said. "The. youngsters are eager to learn and we hope they can help us spread the word aboul fire preven- lion." Dye expressed concern about the growing number of fires in the nation. According to the National Fire Protection Association, there were 2,400,000 separate fires in the nation last year. Losses from aft these fires ivere eslimaled at more than two sillion dollars, an increase of about 200 million dollars over the previous year. Fires killed about 12,100 persons in the U. S. last year, 6,500 of (hem in dwelling fires. Fires damage or destroy more lhan 1,600 homes in the U. S. each day, Dye said. Fires claim an average of S3 lives a day. Dye encouraged parents to assist their youngsters with deas for the school displays. The bulletin boards will be judged on Thursday, with the winners being announced Monday, Ocl. 13. . Humphrey Blasts Nixon's Steps To Entf Inflation ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) - Former Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey said Mon. a iharp rise in unemployment :howed President Nixon's eco- ty to resist this raid on the people of America," Humphrey said. White House policies aimed at slowing the economy to cool in- ramic policies are pulling flatten, Humphrey said, -threat, . · ' _ _ i . _ · i_ ...tit ..i i .. . * t . . ._. \mericans out of work without i slowing inflation. Humphrey told some 1,000 AFL-CIO convention delegates hat Nixon's policy of tight money and high interest .were bene- iting the wealthy at the expense of the rest of the nation. "The rich get richer and the ·nan who lost the presidential election to Nixon. en a drastic increase in unemployment. "That's the old tried and tested Republican medicine guaranteed to produce a cure worse than the disease," Humphrey said in a speech for some 1,000 AFL-CIO convention delegates. Humphrey, speaking to the la- and his Southern political allies at the expense of the rest of the nation. "Inflation, interest rates, civil rights, education, conservation, consumer protection, antitrust --you name it and the Nixon-Agnew administration has remembered its friends and forgotten the rest of us," Humphrey said. "What we have witnessed in the past eight month's is a virtual abdication' of the President's responsibility--yes, even his duty--to take the lead in fighting inflation, in both prices and wages," he said. ·est of you pay for it," said the bor group that was the main bulwark of his Democratic bid for the presidency, said Nixon is "I call on the Democratic par- favoring bankers, corporationstive again. Centuries ago the Spanish believed that copper grew in the ground. 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Maverick. Still $1995*. The Simple Machine. The car that held Ihe price Una Is tho bast-selling car of the seventies. Maverick already has more lhan 150,000 happy owners. Join them ... cea how simple life can be. e wtgettEd relall prlct for Ih. cir. While sldawall tires era' not Included; they aro )32.00 extra. Since dealer preparation charges (if any), transportation charges and alula and local taxeft vary, they nra nat Included, nor Is extra equipment thai la apt* clilr/ necked by lal«lavs. Ford gives you Better Ideas. Ife the Going Thing! GARNSEY AND WHEELER Corner Sih Avenue at llth Street Greeley, Colorado

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