The Star Press from Muncie, Indiana on March 8, 1956 · Page 12
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The Star Press from Muncie, Indiana · Page 12

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Muncie, Indiana
Issue Date:
Thursday, March 8, 1956
Page:
Page 12
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12 MUNCIE STAR, THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1956 Pedestrian Files 85,000 Damage Suit Against City Otis P. Snodgrass, 701 Neely Ave., Tuesday filed with City Clerk James IX DeVoe notice that he was .holding the city li able for injuries he sustained on Jan. 11 at Main and Franklin streets. , He is seeking $5,000 personal damages and $50 for damages to a hearing aid. Snodgrass, who was a pedes trian at the time of the accident, charges Richard Sailors, who was driving a city truck, was negligent and failed to yield right of way to a pedestrian. . Snodgrass said he was crossing Main Street from the south to the north when the city truck turned left off Franklin Street onto Main Street and struck him, Knocking him down. in ovety fegrc box HllTJ CE CLOTH fif P4ju '"'II Wit O God J Will Offer! G today's most; modern blu detergentthe only one with a Cannon Face Cloth inside! New Blue Detergent Silver Dust washes clothes whiter, brighter than new even in hardest water. No bluing needed it's a wonderful all-purptse detergent. Speeds dishwashing! Get large size New Blue Detergent Silver Dust with the pastel color Cannon Cace Cloth inside. (Cannon Dish Towel in Giant Size!) m m - r . .-.... ....li. ,i..un i .. i.'mr "" " ".-"".'r-i.-'J'VS V.'u.."......-j8gji-gJi.JWWJ'WUMW i hw fnipfirig an apple can be' See Dr. SPOCK on if- Marion Tornado Loss Tops Million r ! . , , ' fc iTiiTnliiVinSrimrii'W" " i' iiwfft ljJMAi'rmriSia By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A huge storm cleanup job started Wednesday in northern Indiana, centered ' in Marion, where the worst of a series of tornadoes left one mother dead, 22 persons injured and 500 homes damaged. In Marion alone estimates of the damage Jeft bjj the big Tuesday night twister ranged from an insurance man's one million dollars to a state police total of a million and a half. 20 Marion Homes Crushed The storm leap-frogged northeastward across the north side of Marion, demolishing about 20 homes on the west and northeast sides. The high school, largest build ing in the city, was damaged so badly that school officials expected repairs couldn't be finished before September. All schools in the city were closed Wednesday, and authorities were trying to find some tempo rary classrooms for the 950 high school pupils. Washington Junior High School, with 632 pupils, was damaged but should be repaired for reopening by Monday. Mrs. Eileen Dove, 33, was found dead in rubble 150 feet from the apartment building where she and her family lived on the northeast side of the city. Members of the Dove family were blown 150 feet when the storm ripped off the entire top floor of the three-story brick and stucco building and dropped the pieces in a nearby draw. I 13 of Injured Still Hospitalized The father, Floyd Dove, landed just five feet from a deep creek. The Doves' 5-year-old son, Ran- dy, was injured critically. In serious condition were Dove; his son, Carson, 9; Mrs. Betty En- sor, and Mary Gentry. The Doves' daughter, Rita, 8, suffered minor injuries. Thirteen of the injured re mained under hospital care Wednesday. The American Red Cross flew two of its nursing field representatives and five disaster work-eers to Marion, and the Indianapolis chapter sent its mobile can teen. The Marion chapter set up a headquarters to feed storm victims and cleanup crews. State and county highway crews and 150 National Guard troops and civil defense workers started clearing debris, including countless fallen trees. So much debris littered railroad tracks that the Pennsylvania and Chesapeake & Ohio railroads had to bypass the city. To Survey Damage Governor Craig said at Indianapolis that a Federal Civil Defense Administration official will meet with state and local authorities in Marion Thursday to determine whether the area qualifies for federal disaster relief. E. Roy Wells will meet with n Pi i cri"Hu? I'discovere an H Says Connie Clausen on the TV presented by BEECH-NUT .. T t- 1 , , C' ; Jy,i n y "Jr " t The Top Wreckage of a Byrd Lumber Company building is shown Wednesday after it had been struck Tuesday night by a tornado which cut a path through Marion for several blocks. Buildings in the background were not touched. Bottom A side wall of a nearby building was slammed into the kitchen of this home. The housewife was seated at the table at the time and was pinned under the debris. After being rescued by her husband, it was found she only received a few scratches. Mayor Edward Weart of .iario.'j and Col. Edward" L. Strohbehn, state civil defense director, to survey the damage. The disaster relief law provides for temporary repairs to publicly owned facilities if needed for protection of life and property. In New York the National Board of Fire Underwriters esti mated damage from the Indiana storms at one million dollars and said it was sending additional personnel into the storm are -z to assist in adjustment of losses. The big tornado hit first on Marion's west side, about two blocks west of the busy Ind. 9-37 bypass. It hopped over the bypac: but knocked out electrical service, and state police had ' con centrate on directing traffic where traffic lights were out. Curious crowds thronged the DR. SPOCK TV Program Watching Beech-Nut prepare fruits for babies is wonderful at harvest time! They use apples that could go in a gift basket. And Beech-Nut makes sure Baby gets all their goodness cooks apples with skins on. That way, vitamins and minerals usually lost are captured for a baby to grow on. Beech-Nut always puts babies' needs first. BABY FOODS Muncie Star Photos by John Weesner city, but only emergency workers were permitted access to the storm areas. ! Merle Rife, city school main tenance superintendent, said 90 per cent of the windows were: broken in the big high school. The east wall and a roof section were weakened, and a burst water main added damage. School Supt. Orville J. Hooker estimated damage at the high school at $200,000, and $25,000 at the junior high. The Marion Coliseum, where the basketball team plays, were not damaged, leaving the team unhampered in drills for its appearance in the state semifinal tournament at Ft. Wayne Satur day. At wasnington Junior Hign a chimney fell into a classroom near the auditorium where 40 men were renearsing tor a minstrel show. Earlier a tornado which had hit near Buckley, 111., swirled across the state line and demolished a tavern and three homes at Dunnington, southwest of Fowler. Escaping with minor injuries from the tavern wreckage were the owner, Her- Try and Stop Me By BENNETT CERF Cleveland Amory recalls an evening when four VIP's Dorothy Thompson, Vincent Sheean, and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Luce popped up in Chicago's Blackstone Hotel at a crowded dinner hour. There was no taole available and the foursome milled about, mildy ( ?) miffed, in the lobby for some minutes. A friend of the management spotted them, and pulled anxious ly at the head waiter s sleeve "Do you know who those people ARE?" he whispered hoarsely. "I do indeed," said the head waiter. "I have been told four times, sir." The sergeant glared at an un dersized, sharp-eyed rookie and demanded, "You there, what's the first thing you do when you clean a rifle?" "Look at the serial - number," was the immediate reply. 'The serial number!" roared the sergeant. "WHY?" "To make certain," explained the rookie, "that I'm cleaning my own rifle." Distributed by King Features .Syndicate man Klumpe, and three customers. ' House Blown 30 Feet A Cass County formhouse near Galveston -was blown 30 feet in what the Weather Bureau believed was still another tornado. One woman, Daisy Crane, was injured slightly. The Marion tornado had already hit, knocking out electrical and telephone service in wide areas. Doctors, had to work by flashlight as the injured were brought in to Marion General Hospital. Later an emergency generator was brought in from Summitville. Indiana Bell Telephone Co. reported 2,000 phones knocked out of service in Mariotn. Even emergency calls in and out of Marion piled up so heavy that there were delays up to six hours. State police said the storm was traced two miles north of Marion and then four miles east, but there were no reports of heavy damage in the rural area. Between Dunnington - and Galveston, a Delphi farmer, Joe Vaughan, reported a high wind upset his henhouse and stripped the feathers off more than 100 chickens. Most of them died. For the third straight day the( Weather Bureau issued a tornado alert early Wednesday, applied to southern and southeastern Indiana, but it was lifted at 8:28 a.m. (EST). Temperatures began a steady drop, ending the record-breaking warmth in which the tornadoes were spamned. The rains that came with the storms were expected to change to snow across the state during the night, and low temperatures of 18 to 24 degrees were expected by Thursday morning. Highs of 25-38 were forecast for , Thursday, along with a chance of snow flurries near Lake Michigan. Hail and rains pelted areas all over the state during the stormy period while tornado warnings were coming in rapid succession. A hailstorm was reported at Kokomo, and lightning started a fire that burned a barn northeast of Logansport, while .87 of an inch of rain fell in haif an hour in Logansport. Shoals reported a rainfall of 1.36 inches, Bluffton .91 Mon-ticello .78 and Scottsburg .75. Appellate Court Judge Will Not Run Again Indianapolis JP) Judge John A. Kendall of the Indiana Appel late Court announced Wednesday he will not seek another term in this year's election but will re turn to private law practice with the firm of Stevenson & Kendall at Danville. No candidates have announced for. the post, one of two of the six Appellate Court seats subject to election this "year. The other one is held by Judge Dewey Kel-ley of Whiting, who has not announced whether he will seek another term. Treat 1,039 Alcoholics Indianapolis (UB The Indiana Commission on Alcoholism announced Wednesday that through February 1,039 alcoholics were accepted for treatment since the state program began. Ninety-four of the new alcoholics are women. your only usands of yar in O cotton denims O pongee prints "topsail" prints all regular fabrics, for Spring Fabric Fair only, all fabrics from our regular stock not otherwise reduced are included in this H dlftf f fabulous group lUO Oil Lenten Dinner Speaker Tonight I f v ya 'fi'f'inifVjWtiiM Dr. Chester A. McPheeters, pastor of the Metropolitan Methodist Church in Detroit, will be the guest speaker at a special Lenten family night dinner at the High Street Methodist Church at 6:15 p.m. Thursday in the Parish Hall. Dr. , McPheeters has been a delegate to the General Conference on five different occasions and was a delegate to the Federal Council of Churches during two different periods. He has been pastor of the following churches in Indiana: Nappanee, Trinity Church in Elkhart, and the North Methodist Church in Indianapolis. This dinner is sponsored by the Men's Club of the church and is open to not only the families of the church but to guests. .There will be a special program for the children during the time Dr. McPheeters will be speaking. Persons who cannot attend the dinner are invited to hear Dr. McPheeters at 7:30 p.m. Weidlick Heads Society of Tool Engineers Don C. Wedlick was installed as chairman of Chapter 70, American Society of Tool Engineers, as the group held its installation meeting Tuesday night at the Delaware Hotel. Other officers installed included Emmett Blocher, Portland, first vice chairman; Lester F. Lotz, Portland, second vice chairman; Clark Spangler, Muncie, secretary; N. Francis Wilson, Muncie, treasurer; and Vynul D. Eley, Muncie, national delegate. Committee chairmen named include Jim Beuoy, public relations; Jake Barrett, program; Arthur Kurtz, editorial; Clay Moody, education and professional engi neering; George Fox, standards; Virgil Ferratt, reception; Emmett Blocher, book; and ..Charles L. Marker, constitution and by-laws. Attorneys Enlarging Benadum Block Offices Benadum, Cecil and McClellan, attorneys, are enlarging their offices in the Benadum block on South Walnut Street to include all the second floor, Clarence E. Benadum, senior member of the firm said Wednesday. The remodeling will include two consultation rooms and a much larger room for their law li brary. The rooms were formerly oc cupied by Warner Gear local, CIO, and Gene DeGuzeman, barber. friendly store 3 more fhriiirifrTi-'iir n "1"-V " ,A' our once-a-year Spring mey Still time and still thousands cf yards of sale fabrics in our ;:Iked-about "Spring Fabric Fair." Come share in the giant reductions . . . com be inspired to fashion your Easter Sunday wardrobe. Prices have never been so tiny . . . come see. save on every lavish yard of: pure silks cotton prints miracle blends P I i I FABRICS, Third Floor North jMercliants Elect 18 Directors Eighteen directors of the Muncie Merchants1" Association executive committee were elected Wednesday and will take office April 1. Two holdovers on the board are Don C. Gable, president, and Ralph C. Chase, vice president. ' Elected were the following: Randall F. Bevens, Milton R. Brown, Dewey Chalfant, Harold V. Crane, Mrs. Evelyn . Duling, E. Evans, Mrs. Dorothy Grace-man Mel Grad, Mrs. Thelma Jackson, Jack Kenney, Kenneth E. McGrew, Louis Novick, David Parsons, Charles Penzel Jr., George W. Raid, Joseph N. Sanders, Ray Shonf ield and Thomas Steck. Explorer Scouts Assemble on Double Explorer Post 24, Boy Scouts of America, a local post specializing in emergency service, was handed a surprise alert at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday by adult leader David i Condon. Condon said all 10 members of the group assembled completely equipped within 23 minutes. He said such groups are frequently called upon to aid state and national authorities in disaster areas such as tornadoes and floods. shop today, 9:30 to 5:00 friday is the last day to order specially priced table pads! fr-wwww 'i ixl iliji i wni" i" L ' l ' 'Wi8W'wi'iii- i. ' xvujni 1 n. im 'extension or drop-leaf 36"x48' reg. 9.50 , 48"x66", reg. 11.00 48"x72", reg. 12.50 Protect your tables from scratches, and burns with these custom-built leatherette pads. In a lovely range of colors with sueded cloth back covers to match. Bring a pattern of one-half your table top and the width of your extensions. For drop-feaf tables, make pattern of one leaf and measure top with leaves rbwn. Save now! LINENS, Third Floor your friendly store walnut at days to save on ds of handsome fabrics - i A w " -i i .-3 "J r-rs- if mi i : I I i i JL ,i f- polished cottons orlon and silk printed taffeta p woolens not otherwise f the famous mills j KopnHd For'snn. 'Man Called Peter9 Tops Clarkn Jane, Marilyn in Films 'New York CUD The nation's roiicrinns revival is swampine Clark Gable, Jane Russell, and Marilyn Monroe at tne movie theater box offices, Hollywood's chief censor reported Tuesday night. Geoffrey Shurlock, director or thp motion nicture industry's pro duction code administration, said that the movie "A Man called Peter," based on the lire oi a Protestant minister was 20th Cen tury-Fox Studio's biggest money make last year. The pastor's story outgrossed Marilvn Monroe in "The Seven Year Itch," Clark Gable and Jane Russell in "The Tall Men," ana Jennifer Jones and William Holden in "Love Is a Many Splen-dored Thing," Shurlock. said. FILE LANE WOOD PLAT The plat of Lanewood Section C, was filed for record Wednesday in the office of Betty Pitten-ger, county recorder. The section was platted by - Raymond E. George et aL phone 3-8471 tables not larger than:. 6.98 8.98 10.98 charles foin3 AND. ( CI ZJ MM Bflj abric Fair! ? Vwv ; i it i "luvlin" prints irish linens O lush woolens reduced. All are from 20 Of

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