The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on February 23, 1935 · Page 2
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 2

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Saturday, February 23, 1935
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f AQi FOUR THE BLTTHEVILLE COURIER NEWS IBB COURIER NEWS CO, PX3BLI8HZR8 >' 0. a fciBQOCK, Altar B W. HAIKBS, Advertising U»94ger rational Adurlislng Representatives: Arkansas Dallies, Ino, New York, Chicago, Qetroit, St. Louis, Dallas, Kansas city, Memphis Published Every Afternoon E*«pt Sunday Entered, as etcond class mailer al the post office at Blydieville, Ai- Kansas, under acl of Congress, Go- B, 1917, Served by the United press SUBSCRIPTION JUTB5 By earner In the Oliy or Blytlievillc, 15o, pur wccli, or. $6.50 per year, In advance. By moll, wltWn a ramut ol 50 miles, $3.00 per year, $1.50 for six months. 85c for three months; by mall to; postal zones two to six, Inclusive, (6.50 per year; in zones seven and eight, $10.00 per year, payable ID advance. New German fob Plan Not for a Democracy Not the least valuable wny of si up 'our own rc-cmployment program is (o have an occasional look at (he tilings other nations arc doing to solve the same problem. One of the; most instructive contrasts is' to be found in Germany. On Apiil 1 the N<i/.i govcinmont begins .1 new assault on unemployment \vhich will have the result 'of making every poison undei 25 a unit ui u rigidly state-conti oiled laboi scheme. All lobs foi peiijons unclci 25 will be at the- disposal ol" the state. A young POIEOII holding a job \ull Iju lujuued to 'place his !>ci vices itt the disposal of the htiitc-Ubot seivite Tins orguni- ziitioii-'-. will "have Uiu power to nunil hjni to \\'oik on a faun, to toil on a construction' rf'vojcet.,' or In enroll in a latfoi camp the young woikei is to p.iss miciur the suay of a ccntiuh/ed, disciplined .uithquty i|uiU(j ab /ligid and htiict <is that of^mihtaiy tonscuption. He will not tiy to slait his c.ueei as hoon as lie sets out of .school, instead, he must \\cvk ut jobs someone elhe pick,s for him until he is halfway thioitgh iiis> 20's, iind not until then can he thoohc his own employment Now the icason for «\umminj? that ichenic in buth detail licit ib nol to <iwl a licit' basis foi uihmru of irurr Hitler, but simply to point out thai tonhol of lhu> kind is the logical ie- h^t of any nation-is ulc, authoiiUiuin coutiol of the laboi market by the central govemment Once >ou depait horn .1 lice, fluid laiier maiket you uie headed, ultimately, toivdid this 01 something like it • • • Our own le-cmploynient ptogum hits numfold impeifettioiu>, teitninly. Sonic of these aie inhcient in any attempt to pvit people back to work before the slow piocess of iccoveij can gel uu- railed, and othei.s aiibc fiom the tu»l that ^e aie bucKim,' to do lliu job lluough \olunUiy means, But it is ivorth icinembciing that to givu up this volunUiiy systum in fa\oi of something quickei and more fiflicieiit is a in .st step on the IO.K! to a despotic leyimc like this one in Germany. A certain amount of inefficiency is • the -pdce of ilemocratie govcriiment. By trying (Q build rc-Qinplpynicnl around our existing industrial framework, we are prcsorviiig utir political freedom. If the job seems lo be moving slowly, it is helpful to remember the alternatives. Within Society's Walls ' There died in I'aincsvillc, 0., the other day a woman mimed Mary Cole. She w<is 81 years old, and she had spent almost her entire life in public institutions. When she was a year old, Mary Cole was brought to the comity home Ijy her mother, who had encountered some viniaforluiie or other which prevented her from caring for her child. Then tliti mother wont away—disappeared, died, heavens knows just what. Anyway, Mary Cole was left-for the slate to rear. . The slate did its job. Mary Cole grow up in mi orphanage and spent her womanhood in the county homo, liven the 'earliest moment .site could remember, she was a pensioner. She lived longer Hum most people, but she nc'cci- once lived in her own home with her own people, never knew -a moment of independence, never got even a glimpse of the life ordinary folk enjoy. A strange and tragic commentary on modern society—this long and pa- UieUeaJly wasted life! Trying Wrong Cure Delaware legislators nre reported on this verge of passing a bill which would prohibit public, attendance at the (log- (fings of criminals, The legislators say that Ihu state has received unfavorable- publicity lately because too much attention has been Joeimed on the whippings which aro provided by the state's criminal code. Five youths recently were given from 10 to 20 toshes apiece in lielow- frcezin'g weather, ami tho trencriil,re- action has been unfavorable. The, uiAi'twovablts reaction is easy to understand, but the remedy seems a Iriflo mixed. The theory back of a punishment like, (logging i.s that it will have a deterrent clYcet. Consuciimntly, one would suppose, the more publicity the Hogging received, (he greater its effect would be. H might be more sensible lo abolish the floggings altogether than to try merely to abolish the publicity. SOWW.fl H !.•> necessary to destroy the enemy wittimit Irily.ui- mt-rey, und | 0 \ K \y no uLlcnlion to tlw.' sislvs iind IHUIIIB ol |)ro;(-.«Joiiiil Iniiminilminii.s. —Maxim' Gorky, Uiisilim aiitliui. * « * I havu conic lo l:c a pi'otound Iwlicvur in tlic possibilities or a manuBcd cuiTcncy system. —Frank A. 'VtmdcMlp, New York nuanclcr. T * * Ucliof In (lie supcrnaturul lius liiiulcrcit the proijccss ot mini. — Dr. Charles rraicis I'ottcr, luminnlst leader. BLVTHBV1LLE, (AUK.) COURIER NEWS expected lilm to ma Well, Bho had learni"«i. , viel<y n»d 2J, »vrk» (u a .Ilk cull), slie and ta-fiui-oli hioikcr. VHlln rl tbelr Invalid ftilhtr. l><iner with n strip of iilald humbled, humiliated. was more to it thau and a picture from a fashion m as' had really cared for Brian West- "Look," Josle said, holding thought Urlan Westiuoro to be. STBVB KEVKK8, wh lu\Ui« lai tunrrr Ulm. Sll« liljii an uimtTcr fn u r L . w Cu!c icoe» ukullag, /kruiitfn tin- Ic? u»(l l» IIUIA.V >VKS'i'J1011E, llivr. now acuJ, built break. My I,,mill. OUT OUR WAY By Williams A GUY OF HIS CALIBER, DOIN' EXACTLY AS I WoULDA , UWDER ' CIRCUMSTANCES ' ME GRABBED TH' ' ELECTRIC LIGHT/ TH ' TYPE WRITER AMD TH 1 WELU,ME'S HUMAN, AFTER ALL. IT SEEMS TH' DUMB TH1N6S ARE HUMAM. HE FEUU.AMD PULU6D THEM ALL DOWM WITH HIM. THE .HUMAN TOUCH THIS. CURIOUS WORLD "?J± A U*i&L QT-/ USES ABOUT 2.OOO ACKES OF A YfiAR. FOR ITS PAPER PULP/ (ami COLESLAW (NOT COLO'SLAV/.) % GeTS ITS NAME FROM 'COL£,"Al-t OLD NAME. FOR PLANTS OP THE CABBAGE FAMILY. ••<• IN tliu United ytuti'N, uboiii, live million turils ur u]> cvrry your in the ]iui)iiif;i(!Uiro of pulp Tor iwpr i'iiCKos. Mostly .•'pnicc ami liVmlock iiru used. \voml avc r, inui fov oilier McKenncy Sees Difficullii sj in Playing Contract Whist Solution to Previous Contract Problem IIV \VM. E. McKEXNEY Sccrcliiry, Anicciraii lliiitso Uugnc A t:rc^t luany person;- b:ivc ;is(;- cd inn if contend whist will ever jceoinc popnliir. I i\u; not certain, .ml l do not Hunk that ii, will tit- .rin'l the attention i>| niiiny phiy- ere. Wiu'st was a scientific tame, but was ticvcr vciy jiopuliir." Players die! uol particularly !il;i; iv, c tutn- ot tlic trump. Tlu: r,cxt development was bridge wiiitt. in wtucb tlic dealer vouUl 11:11111: iruinp or. * A U 5 r, 1 « K <J 7-1 *KJ I * •• ' -,} ^J 10 C 1 w " > t) S 5 3 '{ *sa Cc j »S K 10 1 2 p V 1CQ53 ;• » .VJ IOC ' • i\ «Wf * J D75 V .VS « Void + A ID a S 7 Ij '4 U'.'.nlicatc— All vnl. •Snulli VlVM Pa63 7.1*1 - »*> l j a^s :; A i-'ius G *ft rasa OpeuiiiEi t«a f .Vnvth i-;,i;i. I » Doubh '- A l'.r,s •'. + I'JMi !-'o,j Double t — ^ 3, '.y ^ Today's Cfliilract Problem . On a contract ot savea clttlis l)i- South, West opcna the quccii ot hearts. Can you sec just H-lial dlatribuilou is necessary tor you lo utnko your conlracl, assuming tliat lius »l least, throo Jtrjun JiaN coiuv bimie utter tt%o /earn In I'lirln lu enler (lie utlll. l'. illu ^'* u i | B t:ura before he can VICKY THATCHKB, dauchler ot JlllllKlt'l' 'rilATCHKR, general m:t»u|ft'r or <Jie mill, •cheoie* lo I'.ilHIvalc Milan. (inlc mid Sieve n.uurrel, lour Vicky lell» Btluu , ue «nii(«-<o S<M nuiualulcd nlih Ike mill tiurken, on th« grclunic at htlp- IjlK them. He £• l.ltUIK.I, UgrcUM lu <nKu feur li> ««e Gmle, ,X«t CVCIllRIf Illtry Ullll. Alone with <;«is, VIcLy »clti li«r I line »!>*, Vichy. jui4 Brian ate cn- KlilfVil lo lit nturrlcit. Jlrlnn corns. |, nt .k nicer Vlckj him KUIIC, but Cale refu»e» ca tulk til llllD. KO\V tiO ON WITH Till! S'lOUY CHAPTEH XXXlil 'IMIH amazing fact lo Galo was - 1 that everything went on next day, just na U liad. Tlia sun shouo brightly. Uirds were sing- Ins as sho walked to work— fliani, fllirill notes tliat were a mockery.. Two girls, standing beside Halo in tlic cloak room, laughed and joked as they nuns away their coals and hntg. It was all just as It had been the day before. iViul yut, how could it lio? How could tliero be laughter ami gaiety in the world 1 ; How could auy- thins be the sumo when for Oalo Ibcru was only blankness and einntinesn everywhere? Onco during liiut terrible, cnd- Icsa night t!;\lo had pressed her lianda tosclher and linrleil her face In tho pillow, Boblilui; in K mutflcd, mnotliercd voice, "I can't so on! I can't!" Hut Eho knew Unit slie could. Pconlo did, somehow. I'coiilc nil over the world who were suffering and brokcn-liqarled, (or whom In-let vialous o£ Inijipinosa had suddenly shattered, managed to nlcco together their broken lives once luore. Galo llionaht, "It's bolter to know it now. I ought to lie. Klsid it imnncned thia way." Kbe ahould liavo been, and yet the thought Tailed lo cotnfoit uer. Slio had rehearsoil Hie same arguments tho night before. Lying-, wide-eyed, in ilia darkness, sho liad niclurod again lua aceuo wUii Vichy. Slio liad gone over nil that Brian liml eaid Sunday— rragmontary sentences that had seemed BO rrccioiia then. Why uad lie said them 2 Why had lie said, "I lovo you. Gale. 1 think I've loved you oince the llrst time I saw you." Why? Because Stove had liccu right about Brian, and alie tiad licon wrong, liccanse she was a mill slrl and Un;m found It nniualiiE' lo iiretend lie cared tor her. Hflly of her to :;uii|ioae H had lieeu moro than that for one moment- Brian hadn't said, "1 lovo you, tlale, and want lo marry yen." N'oc- (o her. He'd said Uiat to Vicky Thatcher who belonged to Ilia own world, whom everyone /""OM1NCJ home that evening she ^ Heard a call from across ibc atreot and halteil as the snmlioat of the O'Coniiora came flying toward her. He wore a coal several elzes too large, its sleeves dangling almost to the ground. Hia knitted cap was Jammed over his Coreliead, but he threw his head far back, staring up at her with blue, auuralglng eyca. The smallest O'Connor grasped at Galo'u coat with bare, grimy hands and said ImnatienU.v, "Thay — when 1th he comiu' buck?" "When is who coming back?" "You know! The man who doQth tliwlcka." "Oh!" Tho chilly baud clutched Oalo's heart again, u waa a moment hetore she found tier voice. Then she said, "I don't know Tommy. -I— [ don't knovy when he's coming back." "15ut 1 want to theo him! Look — he thaid It wath like thllh _ " Tho grimy lingers dug iuio a half-torn jiockot, producing a cork from a bottle. "lie, thaid — ". Tlio youngster began attempting to ilemoiistrate tho puzzle, but Gale uut a Laud on hi.t shoulder. "I'm sorry, honey," she said, "but I've got to so in tho house now. I've got to get Bupncr. Some oilier time you can show me how tlic trick goes." Hill tin: youngster WHS adamant. "No," ho said, "it'th that mr.n I want to thec. You tell him lo como hack hero. I tsvicd over and over and I can't get It wight. Yon tell him — " Gala sought escape. "Maybe 1'hil knows bow to do it," she said. "Ilu'll uo coiniuy any minute now." i The child shook his heaij. "U'lh [that man I want to thec," ho rc- "Very pretty," Cale nodde; lie liad forgotlcti time slie ii:f promised to hcl" Josie. She nai' looking at [lie fashion pictur' "Oh, yes—this Is the one we d dded on. isn't U?" : Slio gol out newspapers ai'i cut a collar pattern, fitting , auout Joslo's shoulders. si pinned (lie paper collar Into pta and Josie considered iicrself : the mirror and seemed pleased; Sbo said, "Gco, Gale, It mu be sivell to lie «We to sow Ii yon can. 1 tried to make a drc once acid you should liavo ee 1 it! Was I a sight?" Cale was cutting Uio silk, cai fill lo keep Uio edges oven. . " just tnlces iiractfcc." uhe sai isn't hard after you've tie practice.'* id. '" y r 7l,TAYBH that was Ihc wny wi 1Up olhcr tlilnss." she thousl May be after telling yourself bill enough that you didn't care alio 1 a person, lhal you despised Ihe: It would reall.V|lje true. She hop it was like lhal, hoped it wi all her heart! She drew her needle in and o of Ihc silk, taking minute, invi bio slitchea. She had Ibo bin J»S on one halt of the collar wh Josio cut In sharply: "Galo, look—you've £ot it Uio wrong siile!" "Oil, I have, haven't I? 1 Josia oyral lUo oilier g shrewdly. Klie Ihonglit for an i' slant that lliere were lears j Gale's eyes; but that was ridic! i PCiitcj!. Prom tbo rear ot the; O'Connors' house a shrill voice called, "Tom- nice! Oil, Toui-incc!" "That 1 :! your jjotlier." Cale said. "You ninstu'l keen her wailinc." fJiUH) slirill cry wan repcatiiil. * Tommy Ibokud'up at Gale uor- rowtully. "All wiglii," lie said. "I'll go, lint I'm comiu' back! I want to llice that man—" Gale hurried un ihc wall, aud inlo tho liousi;. It wan liriuu wliuin Tommy wauled to see—llrian with Ma tricks to anuiso yonnsstors; liis aay. Haltering spcecliea liiut sverc Llickij, too. . ; . She opciied;Uie duur and callci! a srcotiug to ht>r lallicr.' theu went: inlo tbo lalclicn and metii- odlcally negiiii prcirariiig the cve- nlns meal. ; • After lliey liad'liublicd eiiifiig.' after the dishes hud liucn waalied and; DIII away Jpalo (Jridlcy canie. .losie 'brui'igl'i't : tlic 'urovvu ilicst Gale had \iromibed lo lieln make luns. I'litting Hie binding at' collar on Uic wrong way conldi! make anyone cry. | An hour later, .losic; rose leave, tlic (hushed dress over h arm. Slie said, "Ccc. Gale, yj were swell to <lo this for me. "l like a new dress—^" "I'm glad I tould do H." (!a told her. Slio really, meant Sewing for .losic had lillco t evening. Siio said, "Good uigl Josie. Kec yon tomtirrow!" And ilui5 tlio day ended. T UI'OITOW. Gate told Iicrself. aa s; undressed ami MH into ber. nla' litLle white gown, would lie easlJ Gradually (be days would B") easier and slie would learn to.ti] get tliat slie had been o ridiculous lllllc fool. .Sba oi'on. yoiuo day. tie able tc ut llrian Wtstniore without tu fjharji. ylatiliing jiaiti. Maytie a would lie aliln 10 uiko the mi dent as l lly as lie had — llul slie ccnldii't 1)0 Unit no' .Slie"found out ilia following ev nini, iromiiig bonic from Uie ml just liow far slie was from tliin ing ' rationally. dispassionaiE about the irliole affair. She In hJft Jusic a Mock bcliind. Tur ill's-ii curlier'.' tiulu's liwri andilc ly ix-awd lieallug. There, ahe- of lier. was llriuii. (To l.c Contiiiucil) him to make Ins contract. The Day .West's oireniiiij lc;ul ol lliu tliKc of siiadcb i.-s obviously » s'malslon. \< tills is true, then East holds tin: Icn of -spades, which the declarer will In; while. to "nncsc lor, a tier So lie miuil go righl up with the ace ill dummy and Ihcii cash tin; king of clubs, tsinj /careful to drop the six spot from liis hand, lo conserve an entry inlo dummy. Tlie king of diamonds is the ncsi. piny. Easl lias tipped his liand olT by the double, so lie may as well 5;° up wilh the ncc. which the declarer trumps with Hie seven flubs. . . , - ,. .,, '1'liu viijhl.pt cluhs is phiyrcl HEX', and wins : \iilji tlic pack in dummy. OH the (|i|ecu of cliamonil*. the declarer discards Ihe eight of liKuta. A snuill heart is led und won with tTie ace and then a small spa:le of lead a spade, finesse his nine sp • I iind the conlract i.s mack-. played. The-queen is played fro the dummy, East wins • with . the king, ami , returns the king of, Iicarts, only to have South tnmip *" with, the nine of cluto. The deuce of clubn is played' a'ii'd : Aiijjlc \yurm Sign of Spring AUUURN, Me. (Ul 1 )—Whetl gi l .'!;i\QL'l [he • gi-ouiulhoK saw 6 sluiclow,' ,j 'inorc potent siBn t spans Was sucn l;y Ernest Knollcy ; Knallc was digging sn away from' his home recently wli he saw mi angle, worm working I from the ground. I I U he uiau'l c;ne lu lump U;e dump, he could btldse It lo Ub luiinri', 'I'iicn llley started lo bid lor UIL- rigid lu iijnie Uic Innnp. i n ts w; , s called uucltoii biicige, but slilJ 11 was Just a gs;ue j. r ;:;: u-i\ •'• •••' ,'I'hc v.-oird "broccoli" Ls tlic Hali won in dumimy with Now all tlic declare p.lurai of "broccolo." which OUR BOARDING HOUSE U^A-M-'r5V dOVE, CAN SELL 5UST ONE INTEREST IN "BOX, ILL HAVE -I- TA1D TOT? THAT WAY, W- THt CONTENTS- T>ROV5 OF MO I AM OUT NOTHING, -—-WONOER )P 1 CAN) THE MA-DAM —vNO -. THEM 1 PLACt £ vSEOPATCDY! LISTEN, KVD, QONT OPEN BOX UNTIL WE GET HOME / NOT THPsT 1 NOD, 'BUT IVE , LOOSE HE HAS f\ "REPUTATION TO UPHOLD) ft IT TAKES /-\ . K 4 if A.K7 D I t Nonu * 1CJ if WITH ' ONht IW HIS A 4 AQ 1U J S r, lu next Usus. i;;mc liave nul been by it. liauil. llulnlii be elUiilnalcd Here's a haiul

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