The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on May 11, 1950 · Page 2
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 2

Publication:
Location:
Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Thursday, May 11, 1950
Page:
Page 2
Start Free Trial
Cancel

FACT; TWO BT.YTrTEVn.T.K (ARK.) COUKTER NEWS THURSDAY, MAT It, 19W ' Recent Price Boosts Advance Inflation Talk By Sam Dawson NEW YORK, May 11. (/^—Another scries of price boosts here and there this week sharpens the debate over the prospects oj Inflation becoming a household word again. Here Is the packet ol news: Wool futures prices in New York »t a newscasona! lilgli; mills bidding on government orders for fabric now ask 50 much ns 45 cents a yard more than they did last October; the Sydney (Austrialin) market strong, with the world supply of fine wools lightening. Metals on the rLse again; zinc up another half-cent to 12 cents a pound; copper price advances rumored, as the price of bniss and copper products goes up; steel scrap firm after recent price advances; tin up again. Rise Is Expected The prices expected to go up about five per cent within a month; natural rubber prices, up 40 per cent since last fall, holding fairly steady at (he new highs; natural latex, the liquid rubber from which foam rubber products are made, HOT 35 cents a pound against. 21 last summer; prospects for higher prices for latex products—auto cushions, mattresses and pillows. Dressed pork prices up sharply this week; hogs Inching up recently; spot , prices for wheat, corn, beef, higher Tuesday; cocoa prices, up 20 percent in six weeks, still high Tuesday, putting a squeeze on the candy maker. Gas Holds Firm Gasoline prices holding firm alter their recent climb to new highs in many parts of the country; eastern fuel oil dealers announcing that this summer they will not give any price discounts to lure householders into filling up their tanks early. Whiskey drinkers being told once more that the price of scotch is likely to hold where it Is because of an unsatisfied world demand for limited supplies; but some brands of bourbon have come down In price recently. And vacuum packed collee continues to weaken In price under the determined resistance of the housewife; further cuts of two or three' cents a pound this week by some roafiters who have been unable to move their slocks. But with several of the various wholesale commodity price indexes at thler highest level since late 1948, the debate over the strength of the inflationary trend grows louder. Me tab Below Peak Observers point out that in most Instances prices have not climbed back anywhere near their postwar highs. Even the rampant metals are still well below their peaks In spite of the recent steady recovery. The wholesale price index of .the bureau of labor statistics, more general than most 'other indexes and therefore less sensitive, Is climbing again but Is still one per cent below a year ago and 10 per cent below the postwar high of mid- 1948. Inflation Is on the march again, says D. W.Mitchener, director of research for the Cliasc National Bank of Nov. York. He lias his eye more on (he money market than the commodity pits. He sees credit expansion at an all-time high; farm prices hel rihigh by the government; foreign aid keeping exports above their natural level; housing boomed by federal appropriations; and easy money policies in the ascendancy. On the oilier hand. Dr. Marcus Nariier, finance professor at N'ew York University .admits Inflationary forces are Inherent in [he economy, says the indications arc strong that further increases In commodity prices and the cost of living will be slow. Opinion Given On Arkansas Driving Law LITTLE ROCK, May II. W)_The Arkansas Revenue Department no longer has authority to suspend the driver's license of a person convlterl o| drunken driving. But. says Assistant Attorney General Jeff Duty, it is mandatory for the courts to revoke a. driver's driver's license of a person convicted of drunken driving. The opinion on a drunken driving law passed by the 1949 legislature \va s requested by Deputy Prosecutor noy Sweisenberger of Hope. Duty said the drunken driving law wns changed in 1940 because the revenue department frequently was not notified of convictions and thereby was unable to suspend licenses in ell such cases. However. Duty said that under the 1949 act the revenue department still has authority to suspend drivers' licenses of persons convicted three times for "reckless driving In one year, failure to stop and render aid after an accident and negligent homicide Involving a motor vehicle. Under the 1919 law. courts must suspend for 30 days licenses of ]>er- EOILS convicted of drunken driving frfr the first time, three months on second conviction and one year an the third conviction. BRITISH MIDGET HEADING OUR WAY-This Royal Navy midget submarine, seen on * near Gareloch, bcolland, will join Ihe U. S. Navy this summer for maneuvers and training. sub. manned by * crew of fivt, is a development of the type used in the torpedo attack on the German battleship Tirpitz during World War II. cruls* The Acheson Denies He Would Resign LONDON, May 11. (AP)—secretary of State Dean Acheson denied yesterday reports that he offered reslBiiation to President Truman before coining to London for a current Big Three policy meeting. Ache=pn made his denial In re- siwnse io a. question from a reporter. President Truman asserted in a speech Tuesday thai the secretary has the support of the majority of Americans in the three-way policy talks here, home for rofrshmnts and games, Nfrs. Jane Easterly entertained members of the Wednesday bridge club last week. Honors went to Miss Stella DeLisle, Mrs. Grover Meattc and Mrs. T. A. Lee, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. 1!. E. Patterson had as their guests Sunday members of the Town and Country club. Stork Loses Race Despite Accidents BERKELEY, Calif., May 11. W)—| The car whipped out of Richmond with Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Knox aboard. Police Sergeant Vernon Freeman gave chase in his' patrol car, caught up at the Berkely line. Knox whispered in the sergeant's ear. "Follow me," barked Freeman and took the lead. A Berkeley police ear gave chase. At Dwlght Way and San Pablo, Freeman swerved to avoid a taxi. Knox' car crashed Into Freeman's, The Berkeley c?r crashed Into the Knox car. The Knox and Berkeley police cars were put out of commission. ' Mr. and Mrs. Knox got Into Sergeant Freeman's car and sped on. An hour later Mrs. Knox gave birth in a hospital to her fifth child, a daughter. Indiana Territory's first 1,000 settlers came from Kentucky, Virginia and the Carollnas. The leopard normally fear man. Happy Is The Day When Backache \ Goes Away A» we set oHcr, atress and ttrnln. overexertion, excessive ainuking or cxpojur* to cold sometime* slows down kidney function This may ]«ad many fo!k* to complain of nuKKinK backache, loss of pep mnd . cnvtsy, li«MJache« and dimness, (jetting uu nitlit* or frenucnt passive* may re*u!t from minor bla.Mer Irritations <Jue to cold, ilamimt'is or dietary Indiscretions. If your discomfort* arc du« to th*M causes don't, waii, try Uoan'a Pills, a m1!d diuretic. Used successfully by millions tor over BO ycaw. While lliese eymplonn may oflL-n otherwise occur, U'« amaitn* how many times Vo&n'n Rive happy relief — hel[> Ihe 15 niilea of kidney tubes and fiken flush out waste. Get Doan'i PiLU tod*yl PortageviHe News By Mrs. Raymond Toombs Phone m House Group Rejects Betting Tax Proposal WASHINGTON, May 11. (fl>) _ The House Ways ana Means Com- niUee yesterday rejected a proposal !o put a sin.000.000 to 580.000.000 a year federal excise tax on horse race betting. / Th? proposal would have Imposed 5 per cent tax on the approxi- nalely SI,500.000,000 bet annually through pari-mutuel machines. The idministration had made no recommendation on such a tax. \Vhllr-G:iult Nuptials Miss Rosemary White, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde white, became the bride of Charle.s Oault, son of Mrs. Thehna Gault, In an Informal double ring ceromony Sunday nt 6 p.m. in the Church of ChriM with Rev. Walter Southern officiating, The bride, given in marriage by her father. Clyde While, chose a white eyelet embroidered dres.s with white tulle hat and a bouquet of white carnations. M!. e s Jane Underwood was the bride's attendant and Jane and Judy Edwards lighted the tapers. Music was furnished by Forrest Magness and the high .school boys double quartet. Howard Mow was be.st tnnn with C. C White and Glen Allen as ushers. Mrs. Gaull attended high school at Kayward and graduated from Wardell High School. Mr. Gault Is a graduate of the PorUgeville High School, served in the Navy and Ls now employed by Swift's oil mill. On return from a short trip, the NERVOUS STOMACH AL1.1MIN reUevea disLrreninK symptoms of "nervous Blomach" — heavinca* after meals, belching, bloating and colic ilue to •M. AU.IMINIu»tieeiiliclentinciiHy toiteil ydoctore and found highly effective. World imoua — more tlinn a W billion Bold lo date. couple will be at home at 318 West 1th street. Y1VA Hireling Nine members or the TWA and their leader, Mrs. Tom Stewart, were entertained in the home of Mrs. Herbert. Wynn last Thursday when Patricia Hawkins was addcil as a new member. The program was a debate between Misses Lois and Etelty Phillips with Marlene Stewart as moderator and Velabea Robinson as director. The group will decorate the church on Mother's D;iy in memory of Mrs. Will Webb. Social Notes Mrs. Arvil Adams was in charge of the program Monday when 27 members of the Baptist Missionary Society met at the church. Mrs. Alfred Newcomb, Mrs. Marvin Roe and Mrs. Narlin Inman were hostesses. Mrs. T. E Hogue was surprised Saturday when Mrs .A. R. Urathcr entertained in honor of her birthday. The Faithful Workers Class of the Baptist Church met Friday in the home of Mrs. Bill Stephens with Mrs. Buck Elmer and Mrs. L. Ga- lertii ns co-hosteses. Mrs. Hazel Willey gave the program. Mrs. Emma Christian netcrtained Thursday with a birthday dinner honoring her daughter. Mrs. Rita Lusk. Mrs. Leeds Butler entertained Saturday afternoon with a party honoring her daughter, Sally, on iicr sixth birthday. The guests attended the matinee at the the.itci and then returned to the Butler IT'S COLD STORAGE TIME FOR YOUR FINE FURS, WOOLENS BLANKETS AND DRAPES Double Protection —— 1. Dry Cold Storage 2. Lethal GiLS Fumigation We Invite You lo Inspect Our Storage Vaults CALL 4474 KXX>Xx.xXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX>cA^AAAA^^^AA^s.v^^^^l^^^~^-^^^ ! MOTHER knows NYLON is best! x^xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx ~ NYLON GOWNS 7.90 The perfect gift for mother! Lace trimming and dainty inserts . . . wide shoulder sirups . . . smooth-fitting midriffs^ In pink, blue or white. Sizes 32 to '10. LACE TRIMMED NYLON SLIPS 3. . Luxury Sheer 51 GAUGE 15 GAUGE QOc AT A NEW LOW PRICE! ^f O Pf. Imagine paying so little for ">! gauge 15 denier nylons—especially when they're first quality and in the newest summer shades! Choose from Sonata, neutral taupe, Serenade, muled beige, rrelude, light beige, or JMinuet, smoke-taupe. Sizes 8'A-ll. They're all nylon—even (he liice! They're huys, 3.08. Smooth fitting, easy-lo- cnre-for, long-wearing! In pink, blue, or white. Sizes 32 to 40. NYLON TRICOT BRIEFS 1.49 Slim, sleek band leg briefs Dial wash like hankies Hnd dry in no time at all! Comfortably cut, all-around nylon elastic waist. In pink, white, or blue. Sizes 5, 6, 7. At PENWf YS Stewart Drug Store Illyllicville, Ark. PENNEY'S !! tti nc ™ lng ' ' * ready f ° r y ° U with a W1DE CHOICE of summer's BEST FABRICS ... NEWEST STYLES ... at DOWN-TO-EARTH PRICES! tor only eugar- new look of <l ; ¥\ It/ $ 11 U t I * ^(3 s -^IrV ._ oi _^ _ \. 1_5. LOOK WHAT YOU'GET for ONLY Yes , . . look at just a few of hundreds of reasons why we say "Be Smart. . . I5uy Two!" Washahle hlemlcd acetate rayon and nylon crepes . . . embossed cottons . . . cottons and rayons in casual or dress-up versions. Now's the. time lo pick a well- rounded summer wardrobe... at low Carnival prices! Misses', junior, half sizes.

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free