The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on December 4, 1950 · Page 5
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 5

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, December 4, 1950
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Page 5
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MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1930 BLYTHEVTU.E (ARK.V COURIER NEWS The Natron Today: Defending the Homeland — U.S. Escapes Home Damage in 2 Wars; Is Unprepared for Third By MAX HAU. (For Junics Mar low) WASHINGTON, DEC. 4. (ff, American homeland, almost scratched by the enemy In two world wars, is unprepared for enemy attacks hi case of a third. Therefore, with the world situation growing worse, civil defense has become a subject of red-hot activity almost overnight- la the first world war, the enemy dented the U. S. mainland by a few acts of sabotage only. Probably the closest approach, made German military forces occurred on July 21, 1018. Just off Capo Cod shore, m plain view of astonished bathers*on the beach, a U-boat poured shells into a string ol lour barges and sank them. Per/e Mesta Named Woman Of Year in AP Press Poll By DOROTHY ROE | NEW YORK, Dec. 4. W— Woman of the year for 1950. as named by an Associated Press poll of newspaper women's editors, is Pcrle Mcsla, U.S. minister to Luxembourg. The poll ts conducted annually on a basis of headline interest. Sinre Mrs. Mcsta's appointment In 1949, she has devoted herself seriously "o, her job in the little country. The famous Washington hostess has been recalled to the spotlight hi lhe second war, the ertemy made deeper pinpricks. On the evening ol Feb. 23, 1042 while Americans listened to a fireside chat by President Roosevelt, Japancs submarine rose from the sea near Santa Barbara, Calif, and shelled an oil refinery. In the same period, a submarine shelled the shore butteries at As- j t a. Ore. and a plane released . .11 a submarine dropped incin- diary , bombs near Brooklngs, Oregon, !n an effort to set forest fires. Other submnrine-bascd aircraft are believed to have flown over Seattle. Air raid scares imitated Los An- gelcs, San iTrandsco, New York and other cities—1,4-10 rounds of antiaircraft ammunition were lired in Ix>s Angeles—but there appears to be no proof that enemy planes visited any of those places. Balloons Fall on U. S. " Later in the war. in 1944 and 1915. the Japanese sent thousands of bomb-laden balloons floating across the pacific. One of them killed a woman and five children ..who were picknicking near Lakeview, Ore,, on May 5, 1945. The FBI says there were no cases of enemy-directed sabotage in World War II. Eight German saboteurs were brought to Florida and Long Island by submarines in June, 1942, but they wore arrested in New York and Chicago, and six of (hem went speedily to the electric chair. Si* months before Peart Harbor. President Roosevelt had created the Office of Civilian Defense by executive order. The OGI3 issued arm bands for nlr raid wardens, and so on. Jt also got some unlucky publicity—something to do with /an dancing. Congress providing 5100,000,000 for the agency In 1942, prohibited the use of the money for instruction in "physical fitness by dancers, (an rtfecingr, street shows, theatrical performances or other public entertainments. " .\ "1 W»s * Warden*" f~ H. LagtiardiR. WRJS thft first director of the OCD. He wn-s succeeded by janics M. Land is in February 1942. I was an air raid warden in New York City, and I remember Ihe excitement and responsibility we felt when the city had an air raid 1 alarm soon, alter Peart Harbor. We pinned on our armbands, rushed outdoors, and ordered people off the streets with a great sense of urgency. We had no way ot knowing it was a false alarm, .nor I hat the entire war would pass without the real thing coming. Today this sense of urgency Is returning, and it is not confined to the coastal cities. No one believes that the country .could go through A third world war with only false alarms and pinpricks. President Truman has created the Federal Civil Defense Admin istration (FCDA), headed by Mil- also this year by the* current smash hit on Broadway, "Call Me Madam." In which Ethel Merman portrays the "Lady Ambassador to Lichtcn- burg." proclaimed lustily as the hostess with the mostes' on the ball/For her success in the hit musical, Miss Merman Is voted the year*.* outstanding woman of the stnge with a few votes nominating hci as woman of the year. Others voted outstanding in various fields are as follows: Movies: Gloria Swanson,, for her comeback in "Sunset Boulevard," Literature: Pearl S. Buck, first woman to \vin the Nobel Prize, in 1938. Her moving article. "The Child Who Never Grew," based on the life of her -own daughter, created a sensation this year. Science: Dr. Irene Corey Diller, of the Institute for Cancer Research, Philadelphia, who discover,d a common fungus present in cancers. Sports : G ussy Moran , who won headlines for unorthodox dress the tennis courts, and for two brok- en engagements during the year. Radio: Mary Margaret McBride, vlio recently switched her popular nterview program from NBC to ABC Business: Vivien Kellems, Sloiv- npton, Conn., manufacturer whose continuing fight against withholding Income taxes from her employe* iir.K made her a thorn in the side o: ircJr Sam. Music: Margaret Truman, daughter of tlie President, continuing her concert career. Education: Mllllccnt' Carey Me Intosh. dctm of Barnard College an< mother of five. Use Atom Bomb, Sen. Chase Says TUCSON, Ariz., Dec. 4. (A*)—U. S Sen. MeV Margaret advocates Chase Smith (R use of the atomi bomb in Manchuria if Uu.ssia a" 1 China refuse to stop the Ko can War. Speaking at a Sunday evenin orum at the University of Arizona Irs. Smith declared most, of th :eop!c in the United States iot aware of the gravity or the in cinaLionat situation and that f the leaders are not even a war .r it. lard P. Caldwcll, Jr. The administration has ft.sk ed Congress to enact a law pulling this agency on a sound legal basis and giving it broad powers. There some controversy . over details, but, Congress is expected to. approve most of the program. This time, the state government* will have R greater part in the civil defense set-up. Millions of volunteers must be called to service. They will need better (raining and more equipment lhan the air raid wardens of 1041. The whole population must be taught what to do in emergencies. There is x widespread feeling this time, that we are playing fo: keeps. With the Courts liancery; Mound city Paint and. Cok Company vs. Lesty Noah, et a), su .o collect debf. of $343.32 for prop erty sold defendant, or to recov said properly. A Christmas Caroi by Charles Dickens AwaVcncd (or tVio second time on Christmas E*e, flint-hearted Ebcnczcr Scrooge went looking for the source of the noise. Welt, Scroo^t found onolhtf Ghost. A«l vrhot o GtwiV he was! "I om the Spiritol Christmas Present!" he rooitd nwrfiljr. "Com« in and look upon *i |U i «?* T>it Ghost ol Chnslmas Present look Sooogc mto MM itfte*, "here fhcft wos music—the musk of wishing each other "Meiry Chfijfnwi!' Vichel, Zinc be in Less Plentiful Supply WASHINGTON. Dec. 4. (A 1 )—The government Saturday announced curbs on civilian use ol nickel zinc but lightened existing curbs on nEnmmum. Willla mil. Harrison. National Production Administrator, also revised existing steel supply directives to distribute defense uniers and available non-defense .steel supplies more equitably among manufacturers. In still another order Harrison directed spreading of defense orders for high tenacity rayon yarn—usec primarily lo make tires and parachutes—among the half-dozen producers of that yarn specialty. The new aluminum order permits lion-defense consumption in January at 80 per cent of average monthly consumption during the' first half of 1950. In February, *"« percentage will be 75 per' cent. AHor February, aluminum consumption will be limited to 65 per tent—the figure ttie NAP originally et tor all ot 1951, Civilian use of nickel, n vital me* .al in relatively short supply, will be united during the first three months if 1951 to 05 per cent of the average quarterly consumption during the first six months of 1950. Non-defense production and us« <jf zinc supplies will be limited in any future Ihrcc-moulh period to 8 riper cent of the average quarterly production or use during the first half of 1050. Negro Woman Dies on Bridge MEMPHIS. Dec. 4. (/P>—A Negro woman wns killed on the Memphis- Arkausri.s Bridge yesterday ' when she fell from a truck cub and fractured her skull. The truck driver, Pete Henry, 36 •>( • Memphis, said Jodie Johnson, 5, was thrown from the cab when ic suddenly slammed on the brakes o Veep Jrom hitting another car. Government May Stabilize Rubber WASHINGTON, Dec. 4. (A'l—The Bovernmctit Is considering resuming j Us wartime purchasing of nil rubber imports to climlmVe Use pvlviUe compcllUon which has sent prices snaring. Tlic supply nl robber for clvlllnns would not be nlfcctcd by llic plan which ofticlals snlcl Inst night wj!l be presented to (.he NjiUonnl Security Resources Board for approval next week. Under the plan. Hie government would buy natural rubber rroni abroad and resell It to private In- eluslry. The Government now produces and sells almost all the synthetic rubber in this country. Both natural and synthetic are -allocated lo Rockefeller's Christinas Tree to Have Rival in Hew 'Ceiling of Stan' NEW VORK, Dec. ^. (AP)— The towering Christmas tree that Is rulscd every Yulcllile at ttocke- fcllcr Center will have a new rival tor attention this year—a huge overhead "star" display. In cooperation with the Hnydcn Planetarium, Itiu center Is creating a "celling ot stars" intended to duplicate In every major respect the heavens ol 9 p.m. (KST) Christmas Eve. Several mnjor constellations nnd the Milky Wny will be de- ptctert on a network hung over the promenade between the French and British InilUlmgK trotn Firth avenue to the sunken skating rink at the rear of the structures. The tree Itself will be 65-foot, Industry by the National Productloi Authority. 10-ton Norway spruce—No. IS the center's annual jerlu. RITZ THEATRE Manila, Ark. Monday & Tuesday Warner News * Shorl* Most U. S. lignite Is found In Montana and South and North Da- THEATRE OSCEOLA YOUR FRIENDLY THEATRE Last Times Today 'Wagonmaster' Ben Johnson Joanne Diu Harry Carey, Jr. Ward Bond SHOW STARTS 7:00 P.M. LAST TIMES TODAY - Big Double Feature Program AUDIE GALE MURPHY -STORM -WHTWIKI • lin HOOTXMEWS M<IM«I nj n njir nimum 2 Color Cartoons & Latest News Tuesday & Wednesday Big Double Feature Program ROY ACUFF THE FIGHTING KENTUCKIAN A REPUBLIC PICTURE | Southland News & Color Short Air Conditioned By Refrigeration NEW "Your Community Center" MANILA, ARK. Matinees Sal. & Sun. PH. 58 Last Times Todav BRIGHT LEAF Gary Cooper—Lauren Bacall Tuesda v 'Federal Man r THEATRE 2019 West Main Open Weekdays 6:15 Show Slails 1:00 Salurdays t Sundays 1:00 Always a Double Feature Last Times Today JENNIFER JOHN JONES • GARFIELD OUR JANUARY HALF-PRICE SALE IS HERE BEFORE CHRISTMAS! Ladies New Fall Dress & Casual Shoes now priced from $O49 9 rfr« Artnvndexrix . Gilbert Roland ^g^"' figs —PLUS— Cartoon & Latest News Tuesday & \Ycdncsdav -*-LQlu»rr,x-rrfr-ir;? —I'MJS— »A«t lUHaLt iftcr'Xeif'i'l Piw* f* rsr ' EfSFAi. WEISSMULIER \? «l JW \\ C fosr7&gf , 2 Reel Comedy & Short Regular 4.98. $2.49 Regular 5.98 $2.99 Regular 6.98 $3.49 Regular 7.98 $3.99 Regular 8.98 $4.49 Regular 9.98 $4.99 Regular 10.98 $5.49 To 5 ng tomorrow mnrninR, you have (he savings opportunity of the year! Kor '/diner's usiiiil January half price clearance is offered (o you now...in December.. .so you can save on Christmas -ihnp- pintf! Choose from 1150 pairs of lovely, new Dress & Casual Shoes .. all colors—Slack, red, green, efc. . . . high, medium & low heel styles . . .leathers and suedes.. .every si/.c, but of course not in every style. So I he Ihinjr (o do is come in soon! Although this does not, include our entire slock, you're sure lo find exactly what you want. So choose several pair now and savcl NO HI-:rUN'OS — NO EXCHANGES — ALL SALES FINAL 202 W MAIN Blytheuille, Rrhansas

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