The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California on October 1, 1936 · Page 5
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The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California · Page 5

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Location:
Bakersfield, California
Issue Date:
Thursday, October 1, 1936
Page:
Page 5
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*. •^ John (G.,Wirmrit» Republican, ' Administration; Assails Landon / WASHINGTON, Oct. 1.—John «. \Vlhant,' Republican, who resigned Monday as chairman of the social security board, joined administration forces today in a vigorous campaign defending the social security act. Assails Landon : In''the first of several addresses ho will make In defense of the act •which he has administered since It became a law, AVlnant last night as- Called Governor Alt M. Landon's attack on the act as a "call to retreat." i* ( Winant, twice Republican gover- , nor of New Hampshire, empha- • sized at the beginning of his ad- 'dress he was speaking "personally, Jr>|», ^private citizen." "VVJnant Insisted "an advance has 'begun—Wind no man has a right to call a halt." He vigorously denied the assertion of "the Republican candidate" In Milwaukee Saturday night that the act Is a "fraud" and a "cruel hoax." Act as Americans, Hoped "Until lost Saturday I had hoped that tho attainment of social security would be ,held high above party politics," Winant said, "I had hoped, too, that we might as Americans— and not as Republicans or Demo- crats—j>ut the program Into effect?, 'discover and amend its shortcomings and go forward toward a larger measure of security for the whole of tho American people." , Ho stressed that "compulsory savings for tho ' working man" were preferable to "the fear of a lack of a job and the fear of old age." Individual private savings can never cope with the problem of security, he .said. —— ••»* Lemke Electors Fail to Qualify (United Prott tented TVire) SACRAMENTO, Oct. 1.—California supporters of Representative "VVIlllam Lejnko, Union party candidate for president, will have to content themselves with a write-In vote November 3 because a list of Lemke electors failed to qualify for tho ballot. Petitions seeking to qualify the electors- fell nearly 100,000 short of the required 118,040 signatures of registered voters. Thousands of signatures' were discarded by county clerks and registrars of voters because their precinct numbers were not designated. Faith Fails; Bite of Snake Is Fatal (Associated Prett Leased Wire) - JONESVIDLE, Va., Oct. 1.—The ,, ^Reverend',T.-, 'Anderson, who was '. thrice- bitten by snakes In a "faith I'flenwJnstratlon" at a religious meet- ing'Sunday, died last night, Dr. T. • J?, -Ely said today. • -The doctor said Anderson's dnugh- ter appealed for aid yesterday but ettld the stricken man had waited too long and that medical science . could do nothing for him. Ely said Anderson wns bitten twice on the Tight hand by a copperhead and once on the left hand by a • rattler. i Friends quoted the holiness ..preacher as having said ho would "hold*out faithful to the end." Warmth of Engine Stops Threatened Rattlesnake Coup I (Vniied Preti Lenttd Wire) , CACRAMBNTd, Oct. 1.—Tho en- '-'(rlneeir and fireman of a* freight engine were thankful for the heat of the engine boiler after it had saved (hem from a skin-prickling encounter wilh a rattlesnake. As the freight train pulled out of a tunnel east of here, a'rattler dropped onto the rail handle alongside the boiler, a few feet ahead of the locomotive's cab. Engineer 0. E. Smith yelled (o Fireman Dill Oakes and throttled the train down. Oakes seised a shovel, Smith a stoker, ns the snake wriggled toward the cab. Suddenly, the nttokc stopped, overcome by the heat of the boiler. A minute later, It felt off. Oakes and Smith mopped their brows, returned to their positions. Mil HAILS FOG Pilot's "Worst Enemy Downed by Gasscs From Machine Recently Invented - (United Pret» Leated Wire) SAN FRANCISCO, Oct.. 1.—Fog— aviation's biggest foe—has been conquered, It was reported hero today. This, the most Important development In . aviation since the Invention of the radio beam, was said to have been accomplished In the laboratories of C. n. Pleasant, 44, San Francisco chemist, who spent eight years developing tho "nofog" process. His Invention was tested here over a period of weeks by army engineers and It was claimed that under the most adverse conditions It cleared ground fog on a landing field for a radius of a half a mllo and to a minimum altitude of BOO feet. Even more amazing, It was said that he cleared fog away from the Golden Gate channel over an area of 16 square miles In a witnessed demonstration. Tho apparatus used Is described as being very similar to a small garbage Incinerator, which uses secrot chomlculH that emerge from the fluo In the form of a gray, almost odorless gas. "The released heat, absorbed into the air, creates a dry area which at- tucka and dissipates the fog," he satrl. The apparatus is extromoly simple in appearance and eiistly moved from place to place. It appears to bo little more than a combustion chamber 20 by 22 by 30 inches in elzo and a flue 6 feet in height. • « » Kansas City Thief Not Embarrassed ' (United Prett Leased Wire) , KANSAS CITY. Oct. 1.—Sam Hob- Insori, a druggist, and his clerks, stopping their work a moment, missed a box containing $BO which had been- placed on a counter. 'A delivery boy remembered seeing a young man In a tan overcoat pick It up. Roy Herndon, Negro porter, and the .boy leaped Into Hern don's car, raced after the man, and caught him. He was walking slowly. When they approached, he handed over the box, timlled and walked on. Surprised, they "took it, returned to the store, and received a dressing-down for letting the-thelt escape. REE TO HOUSEWIVES ONLY 6 CANNON TOWELS DURING NATIONAL DEMONSTRATION WEEKS Sept.21-Oct.lO • 6 Cannon Band Towel* are joon absolutely free, (Imply by witnessing, between September 21 and October 10, a home demonstration of • washer or Ironer manufactured fcy 'the General Electric Company. • The time i* short, You don't have to boy anything. Don't delay. Call at oar store or tale- phone for a denMMUtrmtioii 'appointment today. OR MAIL COUPON FOR DEMONSTRATION I- watt 6 Cm** Bmd Tvwwts FREE. I «m fauwMtad fat WASHER D IHONEH 1 & '•' 2015 ChHtir T fff. * L ^ 1* * ,'./'_<T.,ifl* CO 1P»1P«1TOWW^ f^; v ^->f|jf|^g^r^l/'^'."'' i V'- *' - * \ •'•'* '/''i " |Ii: „" "'-V "'<'*•' /'"'""v " ' .*• 4 i.' ' *« ' '• ,*.i- -,'''" , ' '" " lfe •;«,'.*. '^r^Mt THE ttAKfiftsVim.D CAUPOR^UN/tHURSrJA\% OCTOBER 1, 1836 Y Rayon & Cotton Crept FALL FROCKS, Smart lot . $^ Fall sli They flt beautifully, look expensive, yet cost so little! You'll surely want three or four. Sizes 14 to 44. Vsually Much Higher! SILK SLIPS 79«1 Bias Cttt 32 I* H Your choice of bodice or V- top styles, with lace top and bottom! Nicely made, too! White, tea-rose. Buy several 1 Part Linen Crash Table CLOTHS $|.00 i Here's value seldom equalled! Table cloths in gay, woven plaid designs. Lots of colors. Neatly hemmed. 50 x 50. Astounding Value! Patina Ctepe Offered at a\ Very Low « Price! A soft-finished, printed ray- Vn-and-cotton crep». Closely woven. Ideal lor dresses. 3B/ 86 Inches wide. Bargain I Gir/i' TIIC* Stitch UNDERWEAR 2-25* V«rt« and panties of cotton and rayon tuck stitch for young ladles 6 to 18. Warm. Women't Undies $ '... Built-up tudt- ttitch vests or elattic-toppan- tie«. 84 to 44. SHOP. EARLY SATURDAY FRONTIER DAYS OF STARTS FRIDAY OCTOBER SECOND 8 SAVINGS GALORE ON NEEDED MERCHANDISE THUNDERBOLT BARGAINS BEST SELLERS AT BARGAIN PRICES Part Wool BLANKETS Bought Before Prices Went. Up! .59 T-^W*-,'^ pair That's why we can offer them at such a startling, low price. There may not be enough of these blankets to go 'round,-so come early to be sure you get yours. Lovely soft cotton and not less than 5% wool. Pretty pastel plaids. 3-inch lustrous sateen binding. These are soft closely woven blankets. Ideal weight. Size -66 x 80 inches. MantHere'sValiie! Nucraft Non-Wilt Collar DRESS SHIRTS \ Smart New Patterns! 59 They're packed full of style ... full of quality I Genuine fused collars., „ their non-wilt features are permanent! All fast colors and pre-shrunfy Exceptional values! Stock up at this price] for Fall ,and Winter! It takes Penney's to give you a bargain like this! Full-fashioned, first quality, silk all the way to the picot top! New colors. Sizes BVz to-lOVa- Service weight also. A Huge Vafucf Genuine. Whipcord Work Pants Sanforised Shrunk! They're durable . . . practical . . . washable! Heavy whipcords made to take the toughest w»prj Tmigh drill pockets, wide cuff bottoms! Cotton Blanket! Lovely pas Iplildf. Neatly fnUUhed endj Single. 60x70" vidtl Curtain NETS All sorti «t lov*ly neU, 35 / 36* wide. 1 Choose todayi of cream mav- I quimtt. Bxtta wideruffl«.50 >x 2H yds, CRETONNES Bright end Gay! Urge and small ngurt«!| Light or dark grounds' A good firm quality 36" wide Men'i Ribbed Union Suits Fall and Weight Fine quality ribbed cotton! I Long or short sleeves, ankle length legs! Heavy weight for wear through Winter! Men's Oxfords Value/ $198 pair Two styles to choose from. Sturdy, black Bide leather uppers. Tough composition soles and heels. Real buyl Men's Dress Hats $1.49 Built of long wearing, dur-1 able wool felt. A smart new model with a raw edge, snap brim. A becoming shape that will please the most fastidious customer. Top Value I Work Shirts 59c Our tough dependable work shirt at a feature price. < Chambrays in blue and gray. Madras in patterns and an assortment of colors. Boy*' Melton Jackets! $1.98 Navy blue, heavy weight! Melton Jacket. Pull length! zipper front. Adjustable] side straps. Ideal for school] wear! Make Penney's Your "Value Headquarters." Shop In AIR-COOLED Comfort Where Your Dollars Have IVIore " ""• ' 1014 Baker '•; • ;«":/' i '>;t'}''''/x l .''-' ; > 2018 Chester PENNEY COMPANY s^^^^^^^^w^re5^5*p^S^f|«s^^^x'^^^^!^^^^M^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^"^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^5^5B il/^v^Vxfv' - 1 ' ••>}'.',''„•, * : ' ' '' 'j% iJ iw^' M ^y i * ','*•*» " "-•••« j.5,,. • v */ ' • ". •. , ^ML *' 1

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