The Ottawa Herald from Ottawa, Kansas on April 27, 1963 · Page 8
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The Ottawa Herald from Ottawa, Kansas · Page 8

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Ottawa, Kansas
Issue Date:
Saturday, April 27, 1963
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Page 8
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They Understand Government Better After Watching It By BERNICE HOLDEN , WELLSVILLE — Seven young pecnle of the Wellsville Methodist Youth Fellowship, who went on the Washington D. C. -United Nations study tour recently sponsored by the Kansas Conference Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church, have shown a growth in understanding of the functions of gov- . eminent and of the United Nations as a result. A busy schedule which included a lot of sightseeing had its serious moments to reflect upon. There were lectures followed by discussion periods in both Washington and at the United Nations, at which the youth had no difficulty directing questions to the lecturers. Two of the seven, Nancy Harris and Bill Coughlin, gave reports on their trip Sunday, April 21 during the morning worship service at the Wellsville Methodist Church. Bill opened with a report on the trip to Washington and Nancy closed with one covering the visit to Philadelphia and New York. Questioned later, Nancy expressed the thought that whereas she had previously had the feeling that it was "more like machines running the government than pepole," she now realizes the concern of these individuals and how anxious they are to do what is right. "Everyone we met seemed to be so concerned about us," she said. Bill Coughlin said that the tour of the U.N. and the general area 'around the U.N. was outstanding to him. Most impressive was " the prayer room at the United -Nations, called The Room of • Quiet. It is used by persons of ""•11 religious faiths. A small, dark room with an abstract painting at one end, it contains about ten single chairs. C&rtered away from the chairs ;ui a worship center with much Businessmen Call For ^ A Tax Cut :~ WASHINGTON (AP)-A group "of prominent businessmen headed by Henry Ford II has called for a $10 billion cut in corporate and irjdividual taxes — a move hailed by President Kennedy as demonstrating "a high sense of statesmanship." The call for a tax cut was in a statement of principles issued by Ford and 35 other industrialists and financiers Thursday as they launched a drive to whip up interest in tax reduction. Among the major recommendations of the group, called the Business Committee for Tax Reduction in 1963, are that Congress make a. substantial part of the reduction effective as early as possible this year and that a reasonable balance be struck between federal income and expenditures. 8 THE OTTAWA HERALD Saturday, April 27, 1963 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS — Representative Bob Ellsworth, Lawrence, (right), talks with Gene Broers, Wellsville, (left) and Ann Casida, Ottawa, (center). They are in his office in the House office building. KANSANS IN WASHINGTON - Lined up on the steps of House Office Building are all but two of Methodist Youth tour group. Included are six young people from Ottawa and seven from Wellsville. The capitol building appears in the background. the appearance of a long box. Its frosted glass top is lighted from within. Chloe Ann Beattie said that she enjoyed the trip as a whole. An encouraging note was her added thought that the Christian religion plays a more important part in the government than she had supposed. Delon Jacoby cited the entire trip as outstanding in his estimation. He particularly noted the friendliness of the U.N. delegates, an observation which may be lauded with thanksgiving on our part. Carol Lawrenz said the trip in SHOP TALK - Bill Coughlin, Wellsville, (left) and Senator Frank Carlson of Kansas (right) chat amiably. Background is marble wall in the Senate office building. Senator Carlson was host to a breakfast for group of 39 one morning in the Senate office building. Their Prayers Up With Him LEAVENWORTH, Kan. (AP)If the first Negro trainee for the U. S. manned space program ever steps into a capsule for a journey to the moon, the prayers of more than 900 nuns will be riding with him. Sister Martin Mary, sister of Air Force Capt. Ed'.vard J. Dwight Jr., an astronaut hopeful, says that the Roman Catholic community of which she is the first Negro member shares her enthusiasm at the prospect of such a space trip. Captain Dwight completed one phase of his training for the space program at Edwards Air Force Base in California. He is not the first pioneer in his family. Sister Martin Mary, slated to take her final vows in 1M4, was the first Negro to enter the novitiate of the Sisters of Charity of Leaven worth. She knew the Sisters in grade and high school in Kansas City, Kan., "and I bleed their spirit," she said. •She discussed the idea with the % mother superior in 1957 and entered the novitiate for a trial period soon afterward. ,,*'! didn't get lonesome being Ihe first colored person here because we're kept so busy," she Mid. "Your mind is occupied with other things." Since that time, a second Negro, Sister Ann Christopher, has entered the order. Sister Martin Mary and her brother attended Ward High School at THEIR EYES LOOK UP - Sisacr Martin Mary, first Negro novitiate of Sisters of Charity, Lcavcnworth, holds photo of her brother, first Negro trainee for U.S. manned space program. Kansas City, Kan., the Dwight family home. "Since he would visit Fairfax airport and literally beg the pilots for a ride." was five he had j One of them agreed, and after wanted to be a pilot," Sislur Mar-1 that he had his heart set on be- tin Mary said of her brother. "He ing a pilot. Dwight's father, a chemist in Kansas City, and his mother were "pretty excited" when he was selected for space program training. Sister Martin Mary recalls that her own decision to enter the convent was a surprise to her parents. "But my brother concurred," she said, "and encouraged me." Sister Martin Mary's thoughts daily turn heavenward during the religious exercises of the community, but the sisters are no strangers to Captain Dwight's work—not by a rocket launch. She said that the day of the trainee selection announcement, the sisters listener! to the reports on the news, and Dwight gave his sister a space pilot's glossary of terms. So if you're talking about re-entry, the Gemini project or retro-rockets within earshot of Sister Martin Mar,', you'd better know your subject. A graduate nurse, Sister Martin Mary is working toward a degree in nursing education. She excelled on her graduate exam and is doing well scholastically. Although only 5 feet 2, Sister Martin Mary can look her brother (he's 5 feet 4) squarely in the eyes, since she wears the customary 2-inch heel footwear of the Sisters of Charity. But until she sees him again, she has asked her brother not to worry about writing. He will begin a 7-month course at the aero- syace research pilots' school at Edwards AFB starting June 17. general was outstanding to her, and she enjoyed meeting people and staying at different places. In a serious vein of thought, Carol emphasized her realization that the United Nations showed the importance of all people everywhere combined working toward peace. Gene Broers pointed out that the trip was very educational. He felt he profited in learning how our government and the United Nations funiction, and of the work of the different governmental departments. Dean Lawrenz feels he has a better understanding of how the government works as a result of the trip. The visit to the capi- tol building where they saw the Senate in session and the meeting place of the House was most significant to him. The director of the tour was the Rev. Ray Firestone, Garnett. Dean of boys was the Rev. Jim I Nabors, Wellsville. Mrs. Ted Glynn, Frankfort, was dean of girls. 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