The Ottawa Herald from Ottawa, Kansas on April 27, 1963 · Page 4
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The Ottawa Herald from Ottawa, Kansas · Page 4

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Ottawa, Kansas
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Saturday, April 27, 1963
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Page 4
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OTTAWA HERALD Page Four Saturday, April 27, 1963 Editorial* Saturday Notebook A recent editorial in this paper about the increase in cattle rustling sent a county official to the vault where he has dusted off an old record book. County Clerk Bruce Spears dug out the old "Marks and Brands" book which years ago was used to record the ways early day cattlemen indentified their stock. Special markings were necessary because much of the county was open range. The book shows that James Marman had the first brand, registered on Nov. 21, 1868. It was a hole in the left ear and a slit in the right ear of each animal. The last cattleman to register a brand was D. M. Davis. His entry in the book was made June 8, 1901 The records show his mark was a three-fourth inch hole in the right ear of his stock. Various combinations of holes and slits in ears were used in those days along with the brands and initials burned in the hides of the cattle. This And That by jph As land became fenced, farmers found special markings were no longer of great importance. Barbed wire made the fencing of land easy and economical and free range was disappearing. It wasn't however, until March 7,1955, that the Franklin County board of commissioners struck free range in the county out of existence. Still in an historical vein, an oldtimer of the area, now living in California, Mrs. Elizabeth Child Barker, writes us of the early days in Ottawa. Now passing the three quarters of a century mark, Mrs. Barker recalled the days when her father, G. P. Child, was police judge and Ellis Clark was editor of the paper. Her father, she said, was the prosecuting attorney in a murder case before the turn of the century. The crime involved "a young woman, who, after murdering an old man for his money threw his body into a well. Her little sister saw her do it and re-enacted the crime." Quiet Place Where Storm Is Watched For Tourist, What More V «<VK; BANGKOK — There aren't nearly so many Bud dhist temples in Bangkok ac (here are night clubs, but there are more than 400 of the former. They are all of the same general style, yet each has its individual characteristics. Strong influences of both China and Japan are to be seen in them, but at the same time they are uniquely Thai. Whether they are tiny or towering in size, their lines suggest a pagoda. Their overhanging roofs are covered with tiles, sometimes gold in color, but usually they are red with a wide border of green. The roofs are so constructed that they appear to have not one but three or four of them, with each projecting some distance at each end from the one above. At the ends of the ridges and down the sides there are thin projections curving gracefully upward like a symbolic representation of the wing of a bird in flight. From the eves of some are hung rows of brass bells with thin plates of the same metal tied to their tongues. They sparkle in the sun and tinkle in gentle dissonance in the breeze. Under the roofs at either end of the temples there may be rich, blue mosaics or fanciful and elaborate designs in crimson and gold. As for their white side walls, they are decorated with a colorful wealth of detail which makes them lock as if they were the work of a French pastry cook while smoking his third marajuana cigarette. The doorways are not only tall and ornately decorated, but they are guarded by 20-foot plaster statues of fierce looking, medieval warriors. Flanking them frequently are life-size, old stone carvings of ancient Chinese war loards and priests with long, flowing beards. To Your Good Health Within the temples there is a profusion of gold precious stone, and glass decorations and object which, to the western eye, seem overly lush. And always in the place of honor there is the statu of Buddha, usually seated in a cross-legged posi tion. It may be jade, plaster gilded over, or carvec stone, but sometimes it is of solid gold. Thai temples do not stand by themselves alone Usually they are a part of a cluster of sacred struc tures which may be spaced with geometric nicety or may be a clutter resulting from additions tha have been added over the years. Frequently there are smaller temples in the same compound. Elaborate gateways with the same fanciful roof lines of the temples mounted on small posts which. are known as spirit cages Separate spires, if they may be called such, which rise from no more than 15 to 200 or more feet high Some, gleaming white, have the clean lines o my grandmother's silver dinner bell. Some are almost embarrassingly phallic in their inspiration Some of stone have a profusion of carving, with friezes of Thai demons, angels, or monkey officers at intervals Some are more like statues, coverec with gold leaf. In Bangkok there are temples to suit every taste. Sparkling new ones. The Temple of the Reclining Buddha, who measures 134 feet from his toes to his topknot. Neglected old ones, peeling and sagging, on the way to being pulled back into the forest. There is the King's Temple, hard by the royal >alace, which naturally is the richest of all. The temple that towers above a high, artificial hill. The Marble Temple. The Jade Temple. The temple that the week-willed tourists finds himself climbing to the top of. What Buddhist, or tourist, as far as that goes, could ask for anything more? Rinse Wax From Ear Or. Molner n By DR. JOSEPH G. MOLNER Dear Dr. Molner: Wax accumulates in my ears and I find it necessary to have them cleaned by a doctor every four to six months. Is there a simple method by which I can prevent or reduce the accumulation of wax, or remove it myself?-H.B.T. Some people form ear wax _ ?* more plentifully than others. I J take it for granted that you have assurance that your ears otherwise are in good condition. That is, the wax isn't a consequence of anything abnormal. My suggestion, with that qualification, is to irrigate the ears, perhaps every two weeks or so, with a solution of one teaspoonful of baking soda to a glass of warm water to soften, dislodge and wash out the wax as it forms. Use a small rubber syringe. Another good solution is a mixture of one-third hydrogen peroxide to two-thirds water. This simple rinsing usually does the trick. However, do not, under any circumstances, use toothpicks, hairpins or other such things to try to dig out the wax. There's too much danger of damaging the ear. Also keep in mind that wax is there for a purpose: To protect the ears. Only when too much forms is there good reason for removing it. A rinse every couple of weeks will take care of any excess in most cases. Dear Dr. Molner: My friend has a bump almost the size of an egg on her side. She said the doctor told her it was a fatty tumor and as long as it did not bother her to leave it alone. f have read that a lump of any size should be removed, and when it begins to bother you, it is too late. Who is right?—MRS. J.P. Your friend's doctor is right. In the course of a lifetime some of us acquire a variety of lumps, bumps, knobs, warts, etc. Some lumps are cancerous, and should be removed as soon as possible. If, with cancer, you wait for the lump to become painful or bothersome, it often is too late. The cancer has spread beyond any chance of removing all of it. But with harmless growths — and a fatty tumor is such — there's no point in doing anything unless it is big enough to be disfiguring or a nuisance. (Fatty tumors have no tendency to become cancerous.) Dear Dr. Molner: Several women recently have started to take plain gelatin to improve hair, eyes and nail condition. Is this wise? Will it cause hardening of the arteries?—B.C. Gelatin is protein — although an incomplete one — and since some people don't get enough protein, it may help strengthen nails and sometimes aid in other ways. It won't harden the arteries. Auld Lang Syne 25 YEARS AGO Bert N'ewland, who had practiced law in Ottawa since 1934, announced that he was a candidate for fhe office of county attorney. A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Dave Elder. 834 N. Cherry. H. C. Thomas of 1he Bruce and Thomas Auto Top and Awning Company, was ill at his home, 736 S. Sycamore. 50 YEARS AGO Mrs. Nancy Goodrich, 7C, a residenf of the county for 47 years, died at her home, 736 Cypress. Lem A. Woods, a well-known Chanute Tribune printer, was here for a visit with his sister. Mrs. Joseph Marsh. Centropolis Schol District voted $2,500 in bonds for a new school building. Prayer For Today This is the promise that he hath promised us, even eternal life. (1 John 2:25.) PRAYER: 0 God we thank Thee that to human lives Thou hast added hope, mercy, forgiveness, charity, love joy, faith and peace. We thank Thee also that Christ has gone to prepare a place for us and has promised to come again to receive us unto Himself. In His name we pray. Amen. By HARRY F. ROSENTHAL KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP)-Out of a witches-brew of clouds, a gigantic elephant trunk dangles from the sky. It spreads destruction wherever its writhing tip touches ground. This is a tornado, the deadliest thing in nature. In their ferocity tornadoes have: driven wooden splinters into an iron fire hydrant; carried an 83- ton railroad coach with 117 passengers 80 feet through the air; split a huge tree, hurled an automobile into the split and closed the opening. The tornado can occur anywhere in the country at any time of the year. It strikes, however, most often in spring and early summer in the central and southern Great Plains. Kansas, Texas and Oklahoma are the targets for more than one-third of all tornadoes. Add Iowa, Nebraska, Arkansas and Missouri fo make a list of seven states having more than half the total number of tornadoes. One Kansas town, Codell, had tornadoes on the same day at the same hour in three successive years. The greatest killer of all swept from Missouri across Illinois and into Indiana on March 18, 1925, taking 689 lives. About 10,000 deaths are attributed to tornadoes over a 50-year period and property losses are incalculable. Since 1954, the Severe Local Storm Forecast Center in Kansas City has predicted tornadoes and severe thunderstorms for the whole country with remarkable accuracy. In operation, it's a quiet place. Teletype Machines gather hourly data from 300 reporting stations; charts are prepared listing temperature, barometric pressure, wind and humidity. In a darkened room a radar screen sweeps the sky for 250 miles in all directions. It is one of 30 such that together keep most of the country under surveillance. This information is placed before the forecaster, who must rapidly weigh it and issue his report. If a severe thunderstorm is indicated, the center gets in touch with the Weather Bureau in the area and public warnings are issued. "From what we know now, we have to be suspect of most thunderstorms," says Donald C. House, meteorologist in charge of the center. "We still don't know the linkage between the tornado vortex and thunderclouds and we have no reason to settle on one single cause. "We are actively attempting to get close enough to find out what it is and we have planes flying out of Oklahoma City through severe thunderstorms." High-flying U2 planes have been used to take readings and radar scannings are made at 40,000, 18,000 and 5,000 feet every six hours, six hours. "Some of our radar operators think they can tell a tornado from a thunderstorm because it shows on the screen as a figure six," House said. This month a computer will be put to work at the center to digest and analyze information. "It can do in 15 minutes the work that now takes 40 man- hours," says House. "But because the elements that make up predictions are so unstable, it still will take an experienced forecaster to give the final word. The trouble is that now he knows more than he can put to use in time." A tornado causes its destruction at one place in less than 30 seconds. Its path can vary from a few yards to nearly 300 miles. Its rate of travel averages a slow 40 m.p.h. but the counter-clockwise winds at the center are estimated as high as 500 m.p.h. Once a tornadois confirmed, by a spotter or radar, television and radio sets in the affected area crackle with announcements tracking its path. The alerts advise residents to take shelter in the southwest corner of the house, because debris is thrown to the northeast — the most frequent direction of a tor nado's route. Tornado-wise people open windows, because twisters literally can explode a building by creating a partial vacuum outside. Corks fly from bottles and barrels splinter for the same reason—air inside pushing outward. The tornado's force and its lifting motion are the other causes of major damage. Heavy rain and hail, lightning and thunder are the tornado's traveling companions. Hail stones eight inches in diameter have been recorded. Despite the Weather Bureau's knowledge of tornadoes, House says, the farmer still knows them more intimately. The reason: "He has seen more of them." "Some of our radar operators think they can tell a tornado from a thunderstorm because it shows on the screen at a figure six," House said. This month, a computer was put to work at the center to digest and analyze information. "It can do in 15 minutes the work that now takes 40 man- hours," says House. "But because the elements that make up predictions are so unstable, it still will take an experienced forecaster to give the final word. The trouble is that now he knows more than he can put to use in time." A tornado causes its destruction at one place in less than 30 seconds. Its path can vary from a few yards to nearly 300 miles. Its rate of travel, averages a slow 40 m.p.h. but the counter-clockwise winds at the center are estimated as high as 500 m.p.h. Therefore, the emphasis is on early warning. A weather bureau alert had been issued for Udall, Kan., on May 25, 1955 when a twister took 80 lives. But through a communications foulup Udall residents were unaware until it was loo late. By contrast, the tornado that struck Ruskin Heights, a Kansas City suburb on May 20, 1957, killed 44 people. Its toll could liave been much higher had not constant warnings preceded the storm by several hours. Once tornado is confirmed, by a spotter or radar, television and radio sets in the affected area crackle with announcements tracking its path. The alerts advise residents to take shelter in the southwest corner of the house, because debris is thrown to the northeast— the most frequent direction of a tornado's route. Tornado-wise people open win* dows, because twisters literally can explode a building by creating a partial vacuum outside. Corks fly from bottles and barrels splinter for the same reason—air inside pushing outward. The tornado's force and its lifting motion are the other causes of major damage. Heavy rain and hail, lightning and thunder are the tornado'a traveling companions. Hail stones eight inches in diameter have been recorded. Despite the weather bureau's knowledge of tornadoes, House says, the farmer still knows them more intimately. The reason: "He's seen more of them." BLUE GRASS SOD FOR SALE FREE ESTIMATES Ph. Lawrence, Kansas VI 2-1282; VI 3-8285 Ottawa Herald FIRST IN KANSAS 106-108 a. Main Published aan> except Sunday ana Holidays. Second euuH poiUca at Ottawa, Kansas. Robert B. Welllngtca Editor And Publisher subscription rates to trade area—B> mall, one month $1.00, three months $3.00, six months, $5.00. one year O.oo! Subscription rates outside trade ttreu -By mail, one montn, fl.50; tbree montns $4.23; six months. |8.00; on* year, J15.00. MEMBER OF TFTB ASSOCIATED PRESS The Associated Press u entitled exclusively to the use (or publication ol all the local newa printed In the news, paper as wall u all AP news «•» patch. • // P»»r •• I ( N Choose your Pharmacist as you would choose your Doctor. May we fill your next prescription? RANEY REXALL DRUG 304 S. Main CH 2-3092 PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS Free Prescription Delivery OTTAWA HERALD'S BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL GUIDE OPTOMETRISTS Arvid Berglund, O.D. OPTOMETRIST 316 S. Main CH 2-2796 Olin G. Wollen, O.D. OPTOMETRIST 110 W. 3rd CH 2-4303 A. G. Madtson, O.D. OPTOMETRIST 205 S. Main CH 2-4233 Rodney McClay, O.D. OPTOMETRIST Profess'l Bldg. CH 2-3793 CHIROPRACTORS Don L. McKelvey, D.C. CHIROPRACTOR 116 W. 2nd CH 2-4777 J. C. South, D.C. CHIROPRACTOR 116 E. 15th CH 2-2166 Residence Phone CH 2-3961 S. M. Brockway. D.C. CHIROPRACTOR 1408 S. Main CH 2-2386 R. C. Capron, D.C. PHYSIOTHERAPY Ground Floor 113 E. 3rd Office Ph. 2-4100 Res. Ph. 2-2270 OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN HOMER N. FLORA, D.O. Osteopathic Physician Medicine and Surgery Zellner Building Phone CH 2-3746 DAVID L. YOUNG, D.O. Physical Medicine Phone CH 2-3844 222 E. 3rd St. FLYING SERVICE SKY SERVICE Jack C. KiUe, Mgr. SMILING JACK'S SKY SERVICE Municipal Airport, Charter Trips, Sight Seeing Rides, Plight Instructions CH 2-9775 or CH 2-4280 23 Years Flying Experience INVESTMENTS Barret-Fitch-North '"' ,fr a*/co-. INC- MEMBERS NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE Mutual Funds — Stocks — Bonds Robert Dillon — 425 S. Main — CH 2-2445 BUNDY INSURANCE AGENCY "JPIannt-(J InMir.mrr- ro>|, i,---" :HERRY 2-4215 1D6 E. SECOND OTTAWA, KANSAS MEDICAL DIRECTORY J. F. Barr, M.D. SURGERY Profess'l Bldg. CH 2-1268 Frank A. Tramp, M.O. Internal Medicine and Diagnosis Profess'l Bldg. CH 2-1620 Louis N. Sneer, M.D. General Medicine and Surgery Office: 109 W Fourth Phone CH 2-1257 Res. Phone CH 2-3401 David G. Lanry, M.D. General Medicine and Obstetrics Professional Building Office CH 2-1620 Res. CH 2-1227 R. A. Collier, M.D. Surgery — General Medicine CH 2-1182 Res. CH 2-2393 Professional Building Chester H. Strehlow, MD Surgery — General Medicine Professional Building CH -1279 Res. CH 2-5675 Sylva Lofgreen, M.D. Victor J. Lofgreen, MJ). Physicians and Surgeons 3rd & Walnut CH 2-2126 R. S. Roberts, M.D. Professional Building Surgery — Medicine Office CH 2-4325 Res. CH 2-1594 Helming Bros. — 434 S. Main — CH 2-2641 For Prompt Ambulance Service Coll CH 2-1331 Ottawa, Kansas JOE TOWNER'S CHAPEL THE ANTHONY CLINICAL LABORATORY Gladys Anthony Allergies, Bacteriology, Serelogy Hematology, Bio-Chemistry, Parasitology Room 15, Professional Bldg. Ph. CH 2-5296 Home CH 2-3407 ELMOR CRAVEN ASSOCIATE First National Bank Bldg. Phone CH 2-1243 General American Life Insurance Co.. St. Louis Veterinary Service VETERINARY SUPPLIES HESS, FRANKLIN and Others Mann-Bell Drug Store 501 N Main CH 2-3924 BEAUTY SHOPS Ella's Beauty Salon Specializing in Permanent Waves and Hair Styling Mrs. Cecil McArdle, owner operator. Beverly Cole New Location. .134 So. Hickory CH 3-4198 BEAUTYLAND Styling Salon U4 E. 2nd CH 2-4347 OPERATORS: Eloise Milton, Marion Ishang, Sharon Brill, and Wiloma Babcock. owner and operator. Rainbow Beauty Bar 114 W. 2nd CH 2-4263 Complete Beauty Service Maxine Lewis — Owner and Operator June Kunard . . . Zada Lewis Pharmacy Is Our Business Your Prescription Will Receive Our Careful Attention BR1SCOE DRUG STORE 847 S. Main CH 2-413J PREVENT YOUR NEW BABY FROM FOOT ILLS... FIT HIM IN THE FAMOUS DR. WIKLER SHOES BY BUSTER BROWN The New Concept in Shoe Lasting... Perfected by Simon J. Wilder, D.S.O. Fitted Exclusively in Franklin County at RICHARDSON'S SHOE STORE 212 S. Main This Space FOR SALE Phone CH 2-4700

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