The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California on September 22, 1936 · Page 3
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The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California · Page 3

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Bakersfield, California
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Tuesday, September 22, 1936
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Page 3
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THE BAKERSPIELD CALIFORNIA!*, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1936 Associated Williamson No. 4 to Be Produced From Third Sand at Lost Hills Fourth oil zone was found unproductive In Associated Oil Company's Williamson No. 4 In the new field north of Lost Hills, section 2, 26-20, and the well Will be prepared to produce from the , third zone at 1375- 16EO feet. Total depth drilled was 1785 feet. A 10%-lnch string of casing- was cemented at 1024 feet on the second zone, and 8%-lnch has been set at 1375 feot on the third Zone, with bottom plugged to 1560. The number of so-called zones In this area-Is confusing. An oil sho\y only 200 feet below the surface Is called the first zone. Production can J)e considered , to come front one scone, the Williamson, containing a shale break In the middle, the top portion of which Is called No. 2 and the bottom No. 3 Associated has staked out, two more locations to drill—ono 1600 feet northwest of Williamson -No. 4 and., another Ifi the southeast, offsetting- Texas Company's The'ta No. 1. - • SEEK TO EXTEND LOST HILLS AREA In an attempt to extend the new area north of Lost Hills field 1 mile to the southeast, Lincoln Petroleum "Company Is preparing to drill one quarter-mile west of the center of Section 12, 26-20. The location Is slightly east of a point midway be. tween Lost Hills field and the new field discovered by Associated Oil Company pn the' Wllllantaon lease. IM-, . Resume Hunt for Rich Gold Deposit (United Frcti Leatet W(re) EDMONTON Alberta, Sept. 22.— Charles McLeod, Scottish trapper, is planning to resume the search for a fabulously rich gold cache In the wild Nahannl country near the arctic circle which lured two of his brothers to their deaths. McLeod's two brothers, William and Frank, learned the location of the rich gold deposit from a tribe of Ravage Indians who have guarded It for generations In 1905, but were murdered by a companion before they could return -to .civilization. The murderer later committed suicide, and the secret died with him. (.According to legend, the gold field, the location of which Is known only to the wild Indiana, Is BO rich that nuggets can bo scooped up with a shovel. Grapevine Wildcat Flows at 700-Barrel Rate, Sands Up /CREDITED with being the dlscov- vj ery Well of a new field east of Grapevine In the southeast corner of tho valley, tho Reserve OH & Gas Cijmpany's No. 33-2, section 33, 11.19, reportedly-flowed seven hours at the estimated rate of 25 barrels per hour of 22 gravity oil, before sanding tip again. During this period the pressure built-up from 400 to 600 pounds. It Is said that the flow stopped when, the gate was opened wide/to Increase the output, which resulted In sand being dragged Into tho hole. Formations open to production lie at 4446-4474 feet. This la the culmination of two years' .wlldcattlng by Reserve Oil & Qaa Company .In which six locations were drilled. The company Is preparing to go-back In the Old Richie well In the southwest corner of the samo section and make another endeavor to put It on production. Half a mile southwest of the Richie well the 101 Oil Company, headed by M. M. Young, one of the early wildcatters In the district, is rigging up to drill 6n section 6,10-19. Underground structure as indicated by seismograph surveys. Is an anticline running northwest; however, It Is the opinion of some geologists that the accumulation Is governed by a fault like Mountain View field. Other activities aVe Ohio OH Company's wildcat started on section 21, 11-19, two miles north of the discovery well, and Associated Oil Company's core hole northwest of this on section 17, which Is down 8100 feet. Shell Bit Encounters Shale Beneath 540-Foot Oil Zone T OWER limit of the high gravity •*-' oil zone In Ten Section field may possibly have been reached at the shale break, 35 feet In thickness, recently hit at 8280 feet in Stevens No. A-56, section 29, 80-26. Other bodies of shalo have been encountered but this is the largest so far. Stringers of oil sand were picked up below It, and operators are continuing to explore ahead with the Intention of going to 8900 feet. Depth now Is 8341, still In the upper Mio- cene formation, equivalent to tho Santa Margarita. The shale may be between two oil zones. Even though a lower zone is not struck, however, the probabilities of a big producer here are practically assured. As It now stands, the oil zone Is 640 feet thick. This should be enough for an output of substantial size, considering that In the discovery well, the top 80 feet of the formation yields SOO barrels of 60 gravity oil along with 14,000,000 cubic feet of wet gas, at a location which is 60 feet lower on tho strUeture. Old Diamond Field Will Be Reopened (VnUed Prett Leased Wire) BOMBAY, Sept. 22.—A diamond field which used to provide jewels for the great Emperor Akbar (1B42- 1605) Is to bo exploited again. Tt Is situated In tho Panua stato, Bombay, and some stones picked up recently have led a syndicate of business men of Bombay and Ahme- dabad to obtain a concession over 10 square miles for 1C years to mine for diamonds. The stones were sent to south Africa and experts expressed tho opinion they wore as good as those from south African fields. ROOSEVELT BETTER WASHINGTON, Sept. 22. (A. I 3 .)— Mrs Franklin D. Roosevelt, suffering from an attack of grippe, was much Improved today, Dr. Ross T. Me- Intlro, White House physician reported. He eald she probably would be confined to tho White House until tho latter part of tho week. Fruitvale to See Increased Drilling More drilling Is scheduled for west Fruitvale field, with two projects underway on proven land between tho center of section 21, 29-27 and the highway. Rig builder Cain has erected a 10-foot wooden derrick for A. M. Hurts: of Los Angeles on the 10-acre piece belonging to 'W. M. Forney. Jim Brldger will be In charge. North of this, timbers are on the ground for a derrick on land subleased from New Hampshire Petroleum Corporation, ono location south of Doyle Petroleum Corporation's Haborfeldo No. 1. This will be drilled by W. F. Hlgglns and Jim Cochrano. I'OLICEMAN ROBBED NEW YORK. Sept. 22. (U. P.)— Policeman John Kelly called a "cop" today. Ho complained that ho waa robbed by two Negroes in Brooklyn, of gome cash and his service pistol. Kelly said they'd never attempted the holdup If ho had been wearing his uniform, but ho was oft duly. "I know what I want!" say these eyes "I get what I want!" says this chin United States Offers Healthy Market, Phelps Dodge Official Says CONFLICT FACED fUnttf.il rre*» Lra»e4 Virt) NEW YORK, Sept.* 22.— Copper executives were optimistic today regarding outlook for the Industry, but warned that a domestic price increase at this time might "stlflo" demand. Louis S. Gates, president of Pholps Dodge Corporation, on his return from Europe snld he was "entirely satisfied with the present price." There IB a good, healthy market In tho United Stales nt present. so, why try to ntlflo H. . . . Furthermore there Is every Indication tluit domestic copper consumption will Increase as the utilities re-enter tho market, forced by tho steadily rising consumption of electric power." S. R, Guggenheim, director of Kennecott Copper Corporation, who returned from Scotland, said: "Business In general Is very good naturally affects copper prices." He believed that as long as England and France remain well armed thero Is no danger of others going to war. Gates' statement that present prices are satisfactory was Interpreted In trade quarters as an Indication tho domestic price will not be advanced soon since Phelps Dodge Company was a leader in marking up prices earlier this year. Chevalier Project Is Down 1455 Feet J. J. Chevalier of Bakersfleld Is down 1465 feet in his wildcat cast of the north end of Mount Poso field section 3, 27-2S A few oil shows have been reported. The project is seeking a separate accumulation distinct from the Mount Poso field and tho Dominion area northwest of It. OIL AGREEMENTS * Brown Estate, Inc., to A. R. Grlf- fplh—Lease dated July 14. 1B38, onc- « Rhth royalty, fl-months drilling clause, WPB( half of northeast quarter section 22, 28-26. Lardn Land Company to same— Lease datflrt July 18, 1938. one-eighth royally, drilling clause, well on Ar- kcllan land-Jn 3 months; section IK, excluding Southern Pacific right-ofway: lots 31, 82 and S3 and portion lot c; upotlnn 22. excluding west half of northeast quarter, and lots 1. Z. t; section 27, In 2S-2C. Prank Goldman, trustee for Petroleum Supply Company, Inc., to D. 8. Slmdle—Assignment lease on portion northwest quarter of southwest quarter section 22, 32-23, reserving 30 per cent oil, eto. IX S. Shncllo et ux and J. Lamar Riitler to Birch-Ranch and Oil Company—Assignment of above, reserving 28 per cent oil. etc. Snnie to unnie—Operating agreement KH to nhnvn property. Frank Goldman, trustee for Petroleum Supply Company, Inc., to D. S. Shadle—Assignment lensn on portion northwest quart or of southwest quarter Kpcllon 32, 32-23, reaervlng 30 per e.>nt oil, etc. D. S. Shndlo ct ux and J. 1<amar Bu(l«r to Blrch-Ranoh and Oil Company—Assignment of above lease, reserving 28 per cent oil. etc. Same to same—Operating agreement as to above property. • « > COSTS INCRKASB SAN DIECIO, Sept. 22. (A. !'.>— County government In July and August cost $773,626.61, compared I with $694,162.47 tho preceding two j months, the county auditor reports. Mother Wants Baby to Live; Father Wants It Slain Because of Defect I Aflsoelnfcrf Prt»» Z,eaite<t Wire) CHICAGO, Sept. 22.—A. mother's plea for an operation that might save her baby's life, and tho father's demand that the malformed Infant bo allowed to dlo a "mercy death" today confronted physicians at Danish-American Hospital. Mrs. Kva Tafel, 22, mother of tho baby boy and of a normal and healthy daughter 2^4 years old, pleaded: "I want him." Her husband, Julian, a garago mechanic, ropllcd: "It wotTld be a sin to allow the poor child to live. Ho would probably be- bedridden for life, and when he came to understand would curse us for allowing him to live." The baby, named Julian, Jr., weighed S pounds, 18H ounces at birth Thursday. Doctors discovered a malformation of' tho Intestinal tracts^-ajt>sonco pf a portion of tho descending colon', and an abnormal condition of the bladder. Dr. Louis K. Eastman, chief of tho hospital staff, saw no cluinco for tho Infant's survival without an opoi-a- tlon. Even If the operation woro performed, ho sold, tho boy probably "always will be a caro." "Tho infant Is literally starving to death, since tho malformation makes It impossible for him to absorb nourishment." he paid. "But we cannot operate without Mr. Tafel's consent." Mr«. Tafel, Imploring her husband for permission, said, "It would bo a Bin not to give him a chance to llvo. Thero Is always hopo. We can't lot him dlo wlthput trying to do something." My wife will have to wait on him hand and foot, neglecting her own welfare and tho welfare of our other child, "I can't allow it." « » > Pastor Reception Draws 90 Persons DELANO. Sept. 22.—Ninety adults and children attended a delightful reception on Friday night complimenting tho Reverend Clarence Wagner nnd Mrs. Wagner upon their return hero for a second year as leaders ,of tho Community Mclh- odlst Church. Tho reception was given In tho social hall of tho church and was sponsored -by the high school Epworth Loaguo, which gave the program. It. opened with an .original solo by Loland . McUormlck, which announced a puppet show, featuring Queen Elizabeth and Mary Quoon of Seots, written and directed by Miss Aran Ramsey, league member, who also made thn puppets. A vocnl duet was given by Ming Ramsey nnd Leland MrCormlck. nnd the program closed with a. pHtitomino, "Tho Operation," given by WIlllHin Oilehrtst. doctor, Nelson Hnag, assisting tuir- gcon, nnd Donald Smith, patient. Plans for Coming Year to B6 Made by Arvin Scouts (Special to The CaUfornfan) A RVIN, Sept. 22.—Arvin Scouts of j of each month will be Parade night, T^Wlrttt 1 J Ir»ttli»f*»r1 f Vt A!** «*Mn W*H MA ...I* %. n_^.. j._ j ». «l _ _ , i+ . . 14 Initiated their year's ac- tlvltles Friday night with a get- together in the troop barracks Although the attendance was small due to the circus In Bakersfleld, plans wore laid for the year's forthcoming program. The troop planned to follow tho custom started two years ago of attending- the Frontier Day parade, going by wagon to Hahersflelrt. The troop also hopes to have all Its members 100 per cent in uniform by October 1. Troop meeting nnxt Friday night will open tho patrol .contest. Com- with Scouts In full uniform and lively competition between patrols. On tho second night, tho patrols will meet Individually with patrol "dads." Tho third meeting will bo under tho direction of the assistant scout- , master. Al Newark, and will Include j gnmcs, advancement and outdoor scouting. Mr. Newark Is a former Scout from Fresno. The fourth meeting will be an overnight trip or hike. Tho first of these Will bo In the form of a swimming party at tho Scout reservation on October 23, j Those months In which thero Is a petition will bo bnsod on nttendanco. i fifth meeting, namely,"October. Jan- dues paid, advancement, merit ... , , participation In special troop nctlvltloH and outings, projects In special night, "When Do AVo T5nt." Thero Is great promise of a lively • '-••-• v-«.... e «, j'tvgrvio 111 j i nvnj i» Ki™tti> proimsfl vi a lively knots, wood collection, astronomy, and successful year In scouting, the handicraft, leatherwork. etc. Tho pa- j Bcoutmaoter, M. R. Llnncott pre- trol winning tho contest will be entitled to a special outing Thanksgiving. The Individual rating highest In tho spring will enjoy a trip Into tho high Sierras. This year a program of meetings will be initiated. Tho first meeting diets. Two now recruits, Dole Dial nnd Phlny Berry will soon qualify. The goal of 300 per cent In uniforms, when attained, will add much in dignity and pride to the boys who arc part of a world-wide character building organl7Atlon for boys. Heart Ailment Is Fatal to Pioneer DELANO, Sept. 22.—Phillip Frank McDevltt. 76, homesteader and pi- oncer of this district died horc laU Monday afternoon from a heart attack. Mr. McDovltt, accompanied by his nephew, John P. McDevltt, and Mori-ill ITnlos, returned Sunday aft- ornooii from a six-weeks' automobile trip to N'ew Jersey to visit his nieces and nephews there. Tho body is at tho Delano Funeral Parlors. Funeral services have, been set for Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from .St. Mary's Catholic Church with Father Philip Kennedy, celebrating tho Mass. Tho Rosary service will bo at S o'clock Wednesday night, and.intt-rmont will bo In tho Delano cemetery. Ho was a native of Philadelphia. He has resided In this district for tho past 60 years, and wan for many years a largo dry wheat farmer. He, Is survived by his nephew John P. McDevltt. who hna made bin homo with him for tho past six months and several nieces and nephews living In New Jersey. « i » MISSING MAN FOUND VKNTURA, Sept, 22, (A. P.) Weak from throe days' exposure in tho mountain wilds near Ventura, Davo Kuykondahl, Slml restaurant owner, was In the county hospital today. 1'hyslcians rsald he apparently was Buffering from amnesia. Church Group Has Enjoyable Outing ARVIN, Sept. 22.—The Sunday school class of the Congregational Church taught by Claronco Russell, met for Its annual picnic at tho home, of Mr. and Mr*. Russell last Friday night. A delightful potluck dinner was served at tables placed'on the lawn. Following the dinner, games were played under tho direction of Mrs. M. H. Krautnr. Officers for tho coming year we,rc Blso elected: President. Keith Mitchell; vice-president, Mrs. M. H. Krauter; secretary, M. H. Krauter. Members of the class and visitors who woro present Included: Mr. and Mm. Edgar Combs, Mr. and Mrs. H. •E. Dnvld. Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Thayer, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Portman. Mr. and Mr«. Alton Wilson, Mr. a«d Mrs. J. L. Krauter. Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Krauter, Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Krauter, Mr, and Mrs. O. C. Yaussy, Mr. and Mrs. O. C. Yaussy, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Yaussy, Mr. and Mrs. Keith Mitchell. Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Hoke, Miss Grant. Reverend and Mrs. C. L. Nelson, Mrs. Susan Ray, Mr. Talbut, Mrs. W. Welch. Fire Chief Bennett Arrives With New Apparatus From Southern California (Sptotal to The Cott/orfHonJ WASCO, Sept. 22.—Wasco's new fire truck arrived Sunday night about 7 o'clock, having been driven back by Fire Chief Bennett and several of the firemen who went south Sunday for that purpose, including Everett Burkett, Herbert PrlUchke and Charles Sherwln. The truck cost approximately $3000 and Is a combination booster- pumper-lank truck. The tank hold* 250 gallons of water and several minutes are saved in responding to flro calls as the water can be run immediately and a long hose line laid later. The pressure of the water can be raised from 30 pounds to 200 pounds pressure, by pumping directly Into the tank. The new truck will Increase the efficiency of the fire department according to Flro Chief Bennett. The firemen will spend their ev»- nlngs this week practicing with th« new truck so as to be ready for any: calls. Officers of the Wasco fire department are Jack Bennett, fir* chief; Everett Burkett. assistant fire chief; Herbert PrlUchke and MorrU Thornburg, captains. The firs board of Wasco consists of A. D. Fry, Leland Brier and Jack Bennett. GUN KILLS j ASHLAND, Mo., Sept. 22. (U. P.) 1 William Richardson, 16, was dead to- j dny because hit) cousin. Jesso Richard- j son, pulled tho trigger of a shotgun ! ho believed unloaded. A charge I struck Richardson. Keep it handy for Chafed Skin Thrifty buyers are finding they can enjoy a perfectly delicious whiskey for very little money. It is Kentucky's ^double-rich*'straight Bourbon! A Schenley Whhkey -with tht Mark t/Mtrit. Made in Kentucky by old-time Kentucky dUtillen ... the good old Kentucky my. A*k for it at your favorite tarera. l«Mk fcfekkr DfenfrMMi, toe.. W. V. BOURBON WHISKEY I*' PIANOS RENTED,SOLD For as Jit lie us $4.00 per month you may rent u fine piano, and arrangements can be made so thai if you later decide to buy we will allow you full credit for the amount of rental paid on the purchase of any piano. Many Fine Bargains NEW and Usid Don C. Preston Nineteenth and H Streets POPULAR PRICED DRESSES That Look More Than Their Price! Our downstairs store has had remarkable success with this group of dresses—proof enough they reflect more than usual in style und value. Prints and plain colors-by Lady Letly- perfect filling -with frills, plcals as well ns tailored shirlnuikers. You should have two or three in your wardrobe in preparation for fall activities. Sizes 12 lo 20— 38 to \\. BLACK, BROWN RUSTYNAVY QREEN $<«>99 3 BROCK'S DOWNSTAIRS STORE Jehnion't FIrtttoni Auto Supply and Sinrici ' Storji, Ino, Gh.itir , '• V>X'V". IrV"" v««;.«S|Gt!f »»?••, s'< 1 \ f y^>'^^W-^?^^^^^i-'-«'^^''f ( • ' • ^^ •^ WLcli We En«emLle A '. Rich Velveteen Flower. Scarf & i I Belt ... in burnt brown, autumn ! red, ruit, wine, Araby green and '' navy . . . The belt it tubular-j I JtJtcheJ and adjustable, tl»e <carf u full-*izea triangular . . « the coriage it colorful, contraitinj, captivating . , . And the price-— well, nobody ever enriched « coitume for «o little. Sketched from ftocL f ' BROCK'S ^HM^^ .^^Bl ^ff ^W^^- *^M^ ^^W^^w ^^i^r WijjpXfg'Vf' V"s^»" , '.'- 'i", v ' V.jfr *"''•?• &. V t" 'i V • A FASHION HIT! Alligator Knit i SWEATERS Distinctive in a most unusual weave that was inspired by Che skin of alligators! Comfortable! Stylish! Different! . . . really an innovation that compels notice. In romantic fall colors of every kind, the Alligator Sweaters present a choice to your liking—alert women will appreciate these creations. SM ifci llvi «iilf«ttr* In ••r windows tkii Intplrtd tfci 4ttl(nir. BROCK'S FASHION Fi,OPR ' / J > b- «« 1 1«.-' 1 l^k^!ferV ^ '^*WW?< ru l, t ' f .* ^ lr ^ a l?8r ->

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