The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas on May 7, 2001 · Page 10
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The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas · Page 10

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Salina, Kansas
Issue Date:
Monday, May 7, 2001
Page:
Page 10
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AID MONDAY. MAY 7, 2001 NATION THE SAUNA JOURNAL T STUDIO CITY MURDER Blake hospitalized; search for killer ongoing Actor's 45-year-olcl wife is gunned down outside Studio City restaurant By GREG RISLING The Associiited Press LOS ANGELES — Actor Robert Blake remained hospitalized Sunday while police searched for the gunman who killed his wife as she sat in their car Blake, 67, who had left his wife in the car while he went back to a restaurant to pick up his own handgun, checked himself into a hospital for treatment of high blood pressure Saturday and will remain there for at least two more days, said attorney Harland Braun. "He's doing fine and has it under control," Braun said. "But the doctors want to hold him a little bit longer to make sure he's OK." Blake's wife, identified by the Los Angeles County Coroner's oLAM: Office as Bonny Lee Bakley, 45, was shot late Friday as she sat in a car near an Italian restaurant that Blake frequented in Studio City Braun re­ ferred to her as Leebonny Bakley and gave her age as 44. Police refused to comment Sunday but previously said Blake wasn't considered a suspect. However, police searched Blake's house on Saturday and recovered two 9mm handguns and seized phone records and other paperwork, Braun said. Police had interviewed Blake twice — once for about three hours immediately after the shooting and again for an hour on Saturday, Braun added. Bakley was shot once in the head while her husband returned to the restaurant to retrieve a handgun he had left behind. Blake had been carrying the gun because his wife feared for her life, Braun said. It was unclear who or what she was afraid of, he added. "Murder is usually a highly motivated thing but here we have a woman we don't know a lot about," Braun said. "Someone took that opportunity to kill her when Robert left the car She was very vulnerable." Bakley had been on probation after being convicted in her home state of Arkansas of carrying a fake ID. Braun said the couple had signed a prenuptial agreement before their marriage earlier this year that stated Bakley couldn't engage in any criminal activity " They married after DNA tests cc|>i- firmed that her 11-month-old daugh»~ ter, Rose Lenore Sophia, was father^^' by Blake. The girl was originally named Christian Shannon Brando because Blake believed the father was Christian Brando, the son of actor Marlon Brando. Although Bakley lived in a unit behind Blake's home, the marriage was improving, Braun said. "It wasn't your normal love," he said. "They had a common interest in the child." The baby was placed in the care of Blake's relatives. BRIEFLY T JONBENET RAMSEY MURDER Cash for coffin missing from car Sherman Lee Thompson stashed $18,000 in the back of his car, intending to use some of the money for a trip to Montana to buy a coffin. Now all the 76-year old New Florence, Pa., man has is his good humor. The money, according to a state police report, was stolen from his car during the past month. "That was one a hell of a piece of money to lose," Thompson said Saturday. A retired construction electrician, Thompson had amassed the money from a $12,000 savings account, in- . come tax refunds and pension checks. He planned to travel to Montana to buy a coffin because, he said, "It's best to make your own arrangements, and you have to be looking ahead. This time someone was looking ahead of me." Thompson had kept the money underneath a spare tire in his car. On April 5, Thompson was admitted to a Johnstown, Pa., hospital after suffering a seizure. He remained in the hospital for several weeks. During that time, a close friend used the car to visit him in the hospital. During one such trip, the car blew a tire and needed repairs. Thompson discovered that the money was missing from the car when he was released from the hospital. Fight after Kian rally leads to 8 arrests SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Eight people were arrested after a Ku Klux Klan rally when a fight broke out between members of the group and people protesting the event. The fight broke out Saturday when officers were escorting Klansmen to their cars after the demonstration, and the Klansmen said they couldn't remember where they were parked. Three police officers received minor injuries during the clash. During the rally, about 30 Klan supporters or members shouted racial insults and about 150 anti-Klan protesters shouted back at them. Four adult members of the American Knights of the KKK, including Grand Dragon Rick Loy, 32, of Indianapolis, were arrested on disorderly conduct charges. Girl, 12, receives plea deal in attack STUART, Fla. — One of two 12-year-old girls accused of trying to drown another 12- year-old girl will not spend a single day in jail for the attack. Circuit Judge Dwight Geiger accepted an agreement between the girl's attorney and the state attorney's office in court Friday Defense attorney Norman Green said his client probably will receive counseling and perform community service as part of her punishment. "The whole incident was well overblown," Green said. "It just started snowballing and we stopped it. The kids were horse-playing in the lake. It's what kids do. There was no intent to harm anyone." The second girl was also in court Friday but her case was continued to June 1. From Wire Service Reports Ex-detective gains support Theory that intruder murdered JonBenet grows among police By Scripps Howard News Service DENVER — A handful of veteran Colorado law enforcement and legal figures are rallying behind retired detective Lou Smit's belief that an intruder likely killed JonBenet Ramsey They say Smit's views were dismissed by inexperienced Boulder investigators who became so fixated on the Ramseys early in the case that they put more energy into explaining away evidence pointing to an intruder than following clues wherever they might lead. "WTien I saw Lou's presentation, I was stunned, and frankly I was outraged by the course this case has taken," said Greg Walta, the state's chief public defender from 1978 to 1982 and an attorney who has both battled and represented Smit in the courtroom. "What concerns me isn't just that the Ramseys have been crucified," said El Paso County Sheriff John Anderson, "it's that a killer is stiU at large. I'm convinced of it." Last week, Smit, who has investigated more than 200 homicides, took his boldest step yet to draw public attention to his intruder theory, releasing crime scene photographs and offering a detailed explanation of his view of the evidence in a weeklong series on NBC's "Today Show." Three months after Jon- Benet's murder in December 1996, Smit was hired by Boulder District Attorney Alex Hunter to assist on the case. Eighteen months later, Smit resigned, saying Boulder authorities were focusing too hard on the Ramseys and dismissing the likelihood that an intruder killed the 6-year-old girl. Anderson hired Smit to run El Paso County's detective operation after being elected in 1994. He calls Smit a "phenomenally gifted, experienced, uniquely qualified violent crime detective," and supports him in taking the intruder evi­ dence public, a move typically frowned upon by law enforcement. Boulder District Attorney Mary Keenan told Smit she opposed his decision. This case is different, Anderson said, because a predator may be on the loose. Smit bases part of his argument on autopsy photos illustrating the brutality of Jon- Benet's death. One shows the girl's neck squeezed almost into an hourglass shape by a nylon cord used to choke her. What appear to be numerous scratches on her neck above and below the cord are what Smit believes to be fingernail marks left by JonBenet struggling to escape strangulation. Another shows JonBenet's skull with the scalp removed, revealing a massive fracture on the right side that Smit says could only have corne with a tremendous blow to the head by someone wanting the girl dead. "The world thinks the Ramseys did it," Smit said. "But if I'm right, there's a very dangerous killer out there and no one's looking for the SOB." 2^ Mother's Day In McPherson County! Stop By McPherson & Lindsborg to see all the unique products we have to offer youf your friends & your family. MOTHER'S Made Specially For Your Mother! Friday & Saturday Ty Beanie Babies ^ Ty Attic Treasures Boyds Bears • Home Decor Items •Lots of other gift items! EBAUGH'S GIFTS 108 N. Main, McPherson • 785-241-0524 We have everything a mother could hope for in Books & Music, • Gift Certificates • Free Gift Wrapping THE 204 N. Main ... (316)241-6602 GIFT CERTIFICATES • AVAILABLE* Cows on Parade * Mother's Pillows * Home & Garden Statuary • Stepping Stones • Jewelry -k Featuring "Fenton" FREE GIFT WRAPPING & Much, Much More! ,'119 N. Main, McPherson • 316-241-1959 Motfim'A ^xiy. gift Jxiea^ Cottage 11 130 N. Main, Lindsborg, KS Deli, Ice Cream Parlor Pipka Santas Dolls, Unique Gifts (^oihm f par lllN. Main, Lindsborg, KS Quilts, Jewelry, Prints Trapp Candles Camille Beckman Products 785-227-9922 785-227-2829 McPherson's Flooring Super Store • Over 12,000 yards of in-stock flooring ^ • • Couture by Sutton • Repertoire 70 oz. 100% Anso Crush Resister III Nylon Reg. $34.99 Now $20.99 40 colors available • Panache 75 oz. 100% Wear Dated II Tip Shear Saxony Reg. $54.99 Now $30.99 44 colors Wholesale prices available on all Custom Weave & Wundaweave Products • Commercial Carpet starting @ $3.49/yard • Berbers starting @ $5.99/yard • Formica Flooring Reg. $2.99 Now $1.59/sq. ft. • Beige Marble Reg. $16.99 Now $7.99/sq. ft. • In stock ceramic tile starting @ 75 <f /sq.ft. • Mannington Naturescape starting @ $20.99/yard • Carpet remnants 75% off • Mannington wood Honeytone Reg. $6.99 A^ou) $3.99/sq.ft. Free delivery to Saline County call l-877'429'8959 before you pay retail CLASSIC FLOORS & INTERIORS , 911 W. Kansas •McPherson/KS fi Pi

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