The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas on May 6, 2001 · Page 64
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas · Page 64

Publication:
Location:
Salina, Kansas
Issue Date:
Sunday, May 6, 2001
Page:
Page 64
Start Free Trial
Cancel

t- Ibday, however, the nation has become much more knowledgeable about fashion. Television, the Internet and the press all bring fashion news to a wide audience. No one person can have the unpact Jackie had 40 years ago. Of course, there are still fashion icons — from Madonna to Princess Diana. But Jackie is different. Di Like her clothes, Jackie kept her hats understated. She made the piiibox hat her signature. was, and Madonna still is, a fashion chameleon; Jackie's style did not change. It was an expression of good taste more than fashionabUity per se. Jackie combined style and substance, and as first lady she was much more than just a stylish celebrity. Jackie Kennedy wanted dignified clothes that showed respect for the office of president while also conveying the youth and dynamism of her husband's administration. For ceremonial and evening occasions, she chose traditional splendor. But everything ejdraneous was cut away, leaving only the timeless purity of line and color. Jackie understood simplicity was not only more elegant, but also more appropriate for a first lady. Today, people are more cynical. We would wonder who had advised her to wear a particular style — and why Someday, we may have another beautiful young first lady, but no matter how elegant, she can never make the same lasting impression. As the fashion scholar Richai'd Mai*tin once observed of Jackie: "Her style was not vanity but a way of living, not simply adorning herself but expressing her vision of beauty in the world." ca VALERIE STEELE is the chief curator of the museum of the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. USA WEEKEND • May 4-6,2001 13

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free