The Orlando Sentinel from Orlando, Florida on December 13, 1983 · Page 63
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The Orlando Sentinel from Orlando, Florida · Page 63

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Orlando, Florida
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Tuesday, December 13, 1983
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Page 63
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ij 1 f; Who's Mo. 1? Readers want the answer, favor NCAA playoffs over bowls 7je comeback of combat toys in a year of global turmoil r J Weather: Fetchingly fair, night nip in the air. High 70, low 45. Details, page A-2. Tuesday, December 13, 1983 Bang! Bang! Hie wfafiadb entkml A C 1983 Sentintti Communications Company 2 cents The best newspaper in Florida u ) Lebanon7 U SYRIA jff "" ,rS1 vyf ; yj 7 '-vjL l i - . J -7 ' , x c Grenada: All combat troops out Several hundred greet soldiers at Fort Bragg FROM SENTINEL SERVICES . "FORT BRAGG, N.C. The last members of U.S. fighting forces on Grenada came home Monday, seven weeks after President Reagan sent them to invade the Caribbean island. ' About 700 members of the Army's 82nd Airborne Division landed at Pope Air Force Base in steady rain. They later were taken by trucks to their units at Fort Bragg. Several hundred people, many waving American flags and wearing" yellow ribbons, greeted the paratroopers who headed for Grenada Oct. 26, the day after lightly armed Marines and Army rangers landed on the island. Cynthia Salazar, wife of Sgt. Pedro Salazar of Toledo, Ohio, held a sign that said "I love you, Sgt. Salazar, welcome home Charlie Company." ;"I have been waiting for this day forever," said Cynthia Salazar. j John Shannon, deputy undersecretary of the Army, greeted the paratroopers during a brief ceremony near the flight line of Pope Air Force Base. "Soldiers of the 82nd Airborne, welcome home," Shannon said as the crowd cheered. Shannon presented 1st Lt. Robert Scurlock, Sgt. 1st Class Jimmy Mayo and Pfc. Samuel Johnson with the Army Infantryman's Combat Badge, which will be given all the troops. ASSOCIATED PRESS KUWAIT Two terrorists crashed a truck loaded with explosives through the main gate of the U.S. Embassy compound Monday and detonated the lethal cargo, killing the driver of the suicide vehicle and at least three other people. Remote-controlled bombs packed in cars went off at five other locations in Kuwait, including the airport where an Egyptian technician was killed, and the Kuwait news agency said the overall toll from the terrorist rampage was five dead and 62 wounded. No Americans were killed but a few suffered minor injuries, according to U.S. and Kuwaiti reports. They said that at the American Embassy, three Kuwaiti employees and one of the terrorists perished, two people were missing and 37 were wounded, most of whom were Kuwaiti employees or visitors. The terrorists' other targets were the French Embassy, an industrial complex 30 miles south of the capital, an electric power station and a residential area where many Americans live. Islamic Jihad, or the Islamic Holy War, claimed responsibility for the attacks in a telephone call to a foreign news agency, in Beirut, Lebanon. Islamic Jihad is a terrorist group with ties to Iran and also claimed responsibility for the truck bombings at the U.S. Embassy in Beirut in April that killed Terrorist truck route Annex building destroyed 63 people and at the headquarters of the U.S. Marine and French peacekeeping forces in Beirut in October that claimed nearly 300 lives. The Kuwaiti news agency said several people were arrested in connection with the bombings, m , ma . vv 4 2i MICHAEL WRIGHTSENTINEL said a six-wheeled truck smashed through the gate of the U.S. Embassy compound and exploded in a parking lot at about 9:30 a.m. The explosion hurled one of the two men out of the truck and he Please see BOMB, A-1 2 Elves gone as toys turn high-tech By James Fisher OF THE SENTINEL STAFF PALM BAY You won't find any elves in Don Herndon's toy-land. No jolly-faced Santa with a wife serving cookies. No reindeer or snow, and nobody whistling while he works. Toys have gone high-tech and at Western Technologies, engineers have replaced elves the way home video games have replaced toy fire trucks. Toy companies like Milton Bradley and Parker Brothers hire the California-based firm as a "think tank" to devise and prepare prototype toy that the children of tomorrow will pursue with the enthusiasm that Barbie knew in her golden years. "The ideas come from absolutely anywhere," says Herndon, a former Harris Corporation employee, who is managing director at the Palm Bay office. Ideas come from playing other games, from cultural trends, from out of the blue, he says. In addition to developing video games and computerized special-effect toys that first gained popularity in the mid-1970s, Western revamps old-style toys to give them the 21st century flair. The company's latest version of grandpa's tricycle or wagon is Star Rider, a young child's riding toy now being marketed by Play-skool. The toy has no wheels but spins around on an axis, has a spaceship dashboard and makes the appropriate nerve-wrenching space-age sounds. Please see TOYS, A-1 7 IRAN 1 A I U.S. Is a target: A-13 but gave no identifications. It said a seventh car bomb was defused near the Kuwaiti passport and immigration office. Witnesses and hospital sources Handicapping the Democrats' run for tho Rose Garden Candidates buckle down for final stretch of race ,," '' S ' f ' ; ; a , Glenn I j Trying to regroup ! ( -fi faltering organization 1 SSt Mondale . 3 with plenty of en- iVv dorsements and mon- v 4 y tne clear favorite. (- . &t Cranston I r Campaign tied to anti- ' nuclear movement, 'i k may run stronger than i V J expected. "5P ' ' V- J Askew . I Campaigning hard, I but showing no pro- gress in the polls, Jti could fold after New A.""" Jl Hampshire. 1 By Anne Groer and Chris Reidy SENTINEL WASHINGTON BUREAU WASHINGTON The presidential campaign of 1984 is entering a new phase. A. year of raising money, winning endorsements and drafting position papers is behind the eight Democratic candidates. A year of caucuses, primaries and a convention is before them. More and more, the campaign will become the property of voters and television viewers. Less and less, will it be something that only activists and political scientists pay attention to. As the campaign tempo quickens, a look back at 1983 is in order What follows is a review of -. ,i ASSOCIATED PRESS A welcome home kiss . . . Pfc. Brian Lennon, wife Lois. The troops returned on five C-141 transport planes at about noon. A sixth plane, carrying about 150 soldiers, was delayed in Grenada because of engine problems and was to arrive later. Please see HOME, A-1 6 the candidates and the speculations that pass as conventional wisdom in Washington. The winners in 1983 seem to be President Ronald Reagan and former Vice President Walter Mon-dale. After three years in office, Reagan retains his impressive popularity. His approval rating, buoyed by the U.S. rescue mission in Grenada, hovers near 62 percent. White House polls show Reagan leading possible Democratic opponents by 16 points. Although he is not expected to formally announce his candidacy until the end of January, Reagan should have little difficulty in acquiring the money he needs to finance a presidential campaign. Please see RACE, A-8 Sentinel Santa You can help bring a merry Christmas to needy children. Page C-1 "WiB.-Vi.-tJ Si vo Hollings He has solid knowledge of the issues, and hopes to score decisively in the New England primaries. ia'.iffwririjftia t Is Hart His major emphasis is on defense and foreign policy. The biggest problem in his campaign: money. t, Jackson A great campaigner, his emphasis is on voter registration. It is still unclear whether new black voters will support him. McGovern Still has pockets of support from the 1972 race. He is basing his campaign on foreign policy issues. SENTINEL GRAPHIC rare panther in jail if filed under criminal statutes or a $10,000 fine if filed as a civil violation. Dan Stengle, a senior attorney with the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, said Billie was the only suspect in the case of the slaughtered panther whose uncured hide and skull were found in late November hanging outside a hunting camp Atimo Ktr ttillio rr the Riff C.V- State says Seminole killed By Larry Lipman SENTINEL TALLAHASSEE BUREAU I K ft Atmanac A-2 Local & state C-1 Business D-1 Dick Marlowe D-1 Classified F-1 Movies E-7 Comics E-12 Names and faces A-2 Crosswordgames E-1 1 Obituaries C-10 Editorial page A-22 Scoreboard B-6 Noel Holston E-1 Sports B-1 Horoscope A-2 Style E-1 Ann Landers E-7 Television E-8 TALLAHASSEE Seminole Indian Chairman James Billie will be charged today with killing one of Florida's endangered panthers and illegally possessing wings from wood storks, state officials said late Monday. Billie, 40, who won re-election to the $50,000 a year job as chairman of the 1,500-member tribe earlier this year, could not be reached for comment. Killing a Florida panther, the official state animal, is a third degree felony punishable by five years in jail or a $5,000 fine or both. State biologists estimate there are fewer than 20 of the tawny cats in existence, all living in South Florida. Possession of wood stork parts is a second degree misdemeanor punishable by 60 days in jail or a $500 fine or both. Federal wildlife officials said they also are investigating Billie along the same lines as the state. Federal charges carry a penalty of $10,000 and six months Dl,ne press Seminole Indian Reserva tion in Hendry County. The charges are expected to be filed in circuit court in Hendry County this morning by State Attorney Joseph D'Alessandro. Assistant state attorney Marshall Hall said the state would ask the court for an arrest warrant charging Billie with killing an endangered species and possession of body parts of Please see PANTHER, A-1 7 IN A WORD crin-kum-cran-kum: noun. From the Old English word for something twisted. Anything full of twists and turns.

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