The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas on May 5, 2001 · Page 13
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The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas · Page 13

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Saturday, May 5, 2001
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THE SAUNA JOURNAL BREAT PLAINS SATURDAY. MAY 5. 2001 B3 DEATHS & FUNERALS Nola I. Bierbaum SIDNEY, Ohio - Nola I. Bierbaum, 68, Sidney, died Wednesday, May 2,2001, at her home. Mrs. Bierbaum was born Nola I. Schmale on July 11,1932, in Clay Center, Kan. She worked for Clay County Hospital in the housekeeping department for 23 years and was a member of St. Paul Lutheran Church of Clay Center She was preceded in death by her husband, Edwin E, in 1979; • and a son, Michael. Survivors include a daughter, Belinda Reed of Sidney; three brothers, Merle Schmale of Palmer, Kan., Orn Dale Schmale of Scranton, Kan., and •n Leo Schmale of Marysville, . Kan.; and two sisters, Cather- I ine Houser of Las Cruces, =' N.M., and Betty Phillips of Clay Center. The funeral will be at 10:30 : a.m. Wednesday at St. Paul • Lutheran Church, Clay Center, II the Rev. Richard Bruenger officiating. Burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery, Clay Center Memorials may be made to Wilson Hospice, 915 Michigan, Sidney, Ohio 45365. Visitation will be from 3 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at Neill- Schwensen-Rook Funeral Home, 918 Seventh, Clay Center 67432. Donald Wayne Booher Donald Wayne Booher, 73, ,i,Salina, died Thursday, May 3, ; 2001, at Salina Regional Health ' Center Mr Booher was born Jan. 14, 1928, at Hooser and was a resident of the Salina area since 1958. He had worked as a consulting engineer for Boyer, Hagedorn and Wright Engineers and later as a mechanical engineer for Mel Jarvis Construction, both of Salina. He also was a water treatment supervisor for Tony's Pizza Ser• vice, Salina, for more than 15 years and an Army veteran of ., the Korean War His wife, Shirley Faye, died ; April 3, 2001. Survivors include four sons, ] Mark of Bavaria, Richard of Ellsworth, Lee of Junction City ' and Bruce of Salina; three brothers, Harold Booher and ' Delbert Booher, both of Arkansas City, and Claude Hurst of Wellington; and 12 •; grandchildren. The memorial service will be ': at 1 p.m. today at Ryan Mortu- ' ary, 137 N. Eighth, Salina 87401, Chaplain Loah Ann Christy of- fldatlng, Inurnment will ba in Crown Point Cemetory, rural Culver. Memorials may be made to the Rebeeea A, Morrison House, in eare of Salina Re. gional Health Center. ' There will be no visitation. The body was cremated. 'Because of inoomptete Infor- Today's Obituaries SAUNA Donald Wayne Booher Bobby Lee Wilson Jr. KANSAS CLYDE: Gwendolyn J. Hodges CONCORDIA: Merle H. Lavoie, Frances K. "Fran" Walker HILLSBORO: Ethel I. Friesen JEWELL: Oma Matter NATOMA: Walter W. Pfortmlller SMITH CENTER: Janice Irene Dodd WAKEFIELD: Rosetta May Brown WOODBINE: Olive Margaret Garrett OUT OF STATE Nola I. Bierbaum, Sidney, Ohio mation provided the Journal, his wife who preceded him in death was omitted in Friday's edition. Rosetta May Brown WAKEFIELD — Rosetta May Brown, 80, Wakefield, died Thursday, May 3, 2001, at Wakefield Rehabilitation Center Mrs. Brown was born Rosetta May Roberts on Dec. 25,1920, in Clay Center She taught in the rural schools of Clay County and was a member of the First Baptist Church, where she taught Sunday school for 30 years and the DAV Auxiliary Survivors include her husband, Tom of Clay Center; two daughters, Roseann Brown of Clay Center and Rhonda Mall of Waverly, Neb.; two brothers, Orville Roberts and Lowell Roberts, both of Clay Center; and two grandchildren. The funeral will be at 10 a.m. Monday at First Baptist Church, Clay Center, the Rev Daniel Kline officiating. Burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery, Clay Center. Memorials may be made to Big Lakes Development Center or the church, both of Clay Center Visitation will be from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday at Neill- Schwensen-Rook Funeral Home, 918 Seventh, Clay Center 67432. Janice Irene Dodd SMITH CENTER — Janice Irene Dodd, 62, Smith Center, died Thursday, May 3, 2001, at her home, Mrs, Dodd was born Janlee Irene Cooper on Sept, 19, 1938, In Casper, Wyo. She was a business and English teacher for 29 years and a member of the First United Methodist Church of Smith Center and Garden City, She MRS. DODD had served as a Sunday school teacher and on various committees at the First United Methodist Church in Smith Center. Survivors include her husband, Marvin Bryce of Smith Center; a son, Steven Bryce of Phoenix; a daughter, Leslie Diane Bates of Clearwater; two brothers, Robert Louis Cooper of Fort Collins,.Colo., and Bill Gene Cooper of Modesto, Calif.; a sister, Elizabeth Grace Borg of Hendersonville, N.C.; and five grandchildren. The funeral will be at 10 a.m. Monday at the First United Methodist Church, Smith Center, the Revs. Sara Dillinger and Laura Beth Fricker officiating. Burial will be in Prairie Home Cemetery, Esbon. Memorials may be made to the church or the Center for Basic Cancer Research of Manhattan or Salina Hospital-Penn Campus. Visitation will be from 1 to 8 p.m. Sunday at Simmons Mortuary, 116 W. First, Smith Center 66967, and 9 a.m. to service time Monday at the church. Ethel I. Friesen HILLSBORO — Ethel I. Friesen, 88, Hillsboro, died Thursday, May 3, 2001, at Parkside Homes in Hillsboro. Mrs. Friesen was born Ethel I. Wedel on Aug. 4,1912, at Canton. She was a homemaker and dietician and a member of Parkview Mennonite Brethren Church. Her husband, Orlando K., died in 1977. Survivors include two daughters, Twila Warner and Gaila Friesen, both of Lincoln, Neb.; a sister, Edna Dyck of Abilene; two grandchildren; a step- grandchild; five great-grandchildren; a stepgreat-grand- child; and a stepgreat-great- grandchild. The funeral will be at 2 p.m. Monday at Parkview Mennonite Brethren Church, Hillsboro, the Revs. Tim Sullivan and Mark Heilman officiating. Burial will be in Gnadenau Cemetery, rural Hillsboro. Memorials may be made to Calvert Senior Center, Lincoln' Berean Church or Parkview Mennonite Brethren Church. Visitation will be from noon to 2 p.m, Monday at the church. Hillsboro Memorial Chapel is handling arrangements. Olive Margaret Garrett WOODBINE — Olive Margaret Garrett, 98, Woodbine, died Thursday, May 3, 2001, at Lutheran Home, Herlngton, Mrs. Garrett was born Olive Margaret Oesterreleh on July 14,1904, at Woodbine and was a lifelong resident. She was a homemaker and a member of United Methodist Church, Woodbine. Her husband, G, Raymond "Ray," died in 1992. Survivors include a daughter, Rev Phyllis Garrett of Hartford; four sons, Vern "Bud" of Sweet Home, Ore., Reed and Rowe, both of Woodbine, and Willis of St. George; 13 grandchildren; 30 great­ grandchildren; and two great- great-grandchildren. The funeral will be at 10:30 a.m. Monday at the United Methodist Church, Woodbine, the Rev. Linda Toms officiating. Burial will be in Woodbine Cemetery Memorials may be made to the church. Visitation will be from 2 to 8 p.m. Sunday at Donahue Funeral Home, 404 S. Broadway, Her­ lngton 67449, and 9:30 a.m. to service time Monday at the church. The family will receive friends from 7 to 8 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home. Gwendolyn J. Hodges CLYDE — Gwendolyn J, Hodges, 91, Clyde, died Tuesday, May 1, 2001, at Park Villa Nursing Home, Clyde. Mrs. Hodges was born Gwendolyn J. Hageman on June 19, 1909, at Beatrice, Neb. She was a homemaker and retired apartment manager She was preceded in death by her husband, Ray, and a daughter Survivors include a son, Samuel of Liberty, Mo.; six daughters, Beverly Dean Hodges and Adele Webster, both of Kansas City, Mo., Donna Owens of Elberta, Ala., Elaine Greenbaum of Overland Park, Faith Reeves of Mount Carmel, 111., and Harriet Perron of Lawrence; a brother, Warren Hageman of Nebraska City, Neb.; a sister, Gretchen Ferrara of Nebraska City; 25 grandchildren; and numerous great-grandchildren. The service was Friday at Evergreen Cemetery, Beatrice. Nutter Mortuary, Concordia, was in charge of arrangements. Merle H. Lavoie CONCORDIA — Merle H. > Lavoie, 81, Concordia, died Friday, May 4,2001, at Cloud County Health Center Mr Lavoie was born Jan. 19, 1920, in Concordia, He was a World War II Army veteran and was awarded the Purple Heart, He worked for Beech Aircraft and Coleman In Wichita and returned In 1959 to Concordia, where he worked at Boogaarts. His wife, Betty D., died In Survivors Include a daughter, Dixie Trost of Aurora; two sons, Billy and Ted, both of Concordia; four sisters. Alberta Gray, Betty Cochran and Albena McComb, all of Wichita, and Bonnie Flowers of Missouri; nine grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. The service will be at 11 a.m. Monday at Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Concordia, Pastor Cory Shipley officiating, with military honors. Memorials may be made to the donor's choice. Visitation will be after 2 p.m. Sunday at the Chaput-Buoy Funeral Chapel, 325 West Sixth, Concordia 66901, where the family will receive friends from 7 to 8 p.m. Sunday Oma Matter JEWELL — Oma Matter, 87, Jewell, died Thursday, May 3, 2001, at her home, Mrs. Matter was born Oma McCary on Aug. 31,1913, at Esbon. She was a homemaker and a member of Christian Church, Order of the Eastern Star, Port Chapter 55 and Chamber of Commerce, all of Jewell. She was preceded in death by her husband, David, in 2000; and a son, Clinton. Survivors include a daughter, Myrna May of Madison; a brother. Max McCary of Jewell; three grandchildren; several stepgrandchildren; and some great-grandchildren. The funeral will be at 10:30 a.m. Monday at the Christian Church, Jewell, the Rev Dan Daniels officiating. Burial will be in Wallace Cemetery east of Jewell. Memorials may be made to the church or OES, Jewell. Visitation will be at Kleppinger Funeral Home, 409 Broadway, Jewell 66949. Walter W. Pfortmlller NATOMA — Walter W. Pfort­ mlller, 107, Natoma, died Thursday, May 3, 2001, at Western Plains Medical Center, Dodge City. Mr. Pfortmlller was born May 10,1893, near Natoma and was a lifetime resident until he moved to Dodge City in 1981. He was a farmer-stockman and a carpenter and a member of Peace Lutheran Church, Natoma. He was preceded in death by his wife, Clara Sophia, in 1996; a son, Howard; and a daughter, Ordella Zeckser Survivors include two sons, Orville of Natoma and Delmar of Yorba Linda, Calif.; two daughters, Laura Summers of Rogersville, Mo., and Lucille Snodgrass of Dodge City; 12 grandchildren; 21 great-grandchildren; and two great-great­ grandchildren, The funeral will be at 10:30 a.m. Monday at Peace Lutheran Church, Natoma, the Rev. L.J. McDermott officiating. Burial will be In North Lutheran Cemetery, Natoma. Memorials may be made to the church or Lutheran Hour. Visitation will be from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday at Pohlman's Mortuary, 701 N. First, Natoma 07651, and 9:30 a.m. to service time Monday at • NATURAL OAS • 2001 WHEAT CROP Farmers insured for $1 billion Winter wheat crop in Kansas, other states, looks bleak By ROXANA HEGEMAN The Associated Press WICHITA — Farmers in the nation's top winter wheat states face a bleak 2001 wheat harvest with fewer acres insured — despite last year's drought and government subsidies to entice farmers to better insure their crops, an extension ag economist said Friday But those farmers that did take advantage of larger government subsidies on crop revenue coverage insured a record $1 billion of the hard red winter wheat crop grown in Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Colorado, said Art Barnaby Jr, an extension economist at Kansas State University That was a huge jump from the $205 million in revenue crop insurance carried in those states last year, he said. Barnaby compiled an analysis for The Associated Press of insurance coverage on the winter wheat crop — and his findings Friday surprised not only him, but debunked widely held assumptions that wheat growers had insured more acreage after dusting their seed into parched fields. "It is a shocker," Barnaby said. What he found is a growing chasm between those wheat growers with no insurance protection at all and those who are carrying record levels of coverage on fewer acres. Among the five biggest wheat producing states, the number of insured hard red winter wheat acres insured fell by 2.8 percent. About 68 percent of those planted acres carry insurance, compared to 74 percent insured last year In Kansas, the nation's top wheat grower, the number of insured acres fell by 7.7 percent. Just 70 percent of the winter wheat acres in Kansas have any kind of crop insurance coverage, compared to nearly 78 percent a year ago, Barnaby said. The lower acreage figures come at the same time Kansas farmers are carrying a record $494.9 million in crop revenue insurance coverage on their winter wheat crop, he said. Total insurance coverage for Kansas wheat, including the minimal catastrophic coverage, went from $534 million to $536 million this year The biggest decline came in catastrophic crop coverage. The government pays all the premium for that coverage. But the service fee charged for it rose last year from $50 to $100 a year for it, and many farmers simply dropped it, Barnaby said. "The strange thing is when they dropped catastrophic coverage they didn't buy anything else — which surprises me because of the dry weather last fall," Barnaby said. Government officials had hoped to entice more farmers to carry better crop coverage by paying more of the share of those premiums. For example, the U.S. Department of Agriculture pays 59 percent of the premium for a farmer who buys coverage at the 70- percent level. Wheat Insurance coverage Insurance coverage on the 2001 hard red winter wheat crop: • Record $1 billion in crop revenue coverage for winter wheat crop growri in Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Colorado. That compares to $205 million in revenue crop insurance carried in those states last year. • Including catastrophic coverage, the total insurance levels rise to $1.2 billion for the top five wheat producing states. • Number of insured hard red winter wheat acres insured fell by 2.8 percent in the five states; About 68 percent of those planted acres carry insurance, compared to 74 percent insured last year. • In Kansas, the number of insured acres fell by 7.7 percent. • Just 70 percent of the winter wheat acres in Kansas have any kind of crop insurance coverage, compared to nearly 78 percent a year ago. • Kansas farmers are carrying a record $494.9 million in crop revenue insurance coverage on their winter wheat crop. • Total insurance coverage for Kansas wheat, including the minimal catastrophic coverage, went from $534 million last year to $536 million this year. Source: Art Barnaby, extension ag economist at Kansas State University The lower acreage figures indicate most of the increase in dollar coverage came from producers who already had revenue insurance and simply upgraded their existing coverage to take advantage of the better coverage levels and higher subsidies. "This will likely get mixed up in any debate on disaster aid — and runs counter to other crops because policy counts are up nationwide," Barnaby said. All this comes in the backdrop of what many are already anticipating to be a dis­ mal wheat crop — especially in Kansas and Oklahoma. The Wheat Quality Council has estimated this year's Kansas wheat harvest at 277 million bushel after its annual tour this week of the state's wheat fields. That is the smallest wheat crop since 1996, when 255 million bushels were harvested, according to Kansas Agricultural Statistics Service. The wheat crop is so poor in the state that Kansas farmers are expected to abandon as much as 13 percent of planted acres. the church. Frances K. "Fran" Walker CONCORDIA — Frances K. "Fran" Walker, 59, Concordia, died Tuesday, May 1, 2001, south of Concordia as the result of an automobile crash. Mrs. Walker was born Frances K. Leathers on Oct. 23, 1941, at Pulaski, 111. She had worked as a missionary in Africa and later operated Walker Veterinary Clinic, Concordia, with her husband. She attended Baptist Church, Concordia, where she directed the church choir and bell choir and played the organ and piano. She also taught theory and piano classes at Cloud County Community College and was involved in community plays and choruses and accompanied many children's solos. She was preceded in death by a stepdaughter, Melanie Walker Survivors include her husband, Dr James C. of Concordia; a daughter, Cindy Chupp; a son, the Rev. Doug; three stepchildren, Jamie Harrison, Martha Walker and Nicole Powell; a sister, Dorothy Burklow; and 13 grandchildren. The funeral will be at 10:30 a.m. today at The Baptist Church, Concordia, the Rev. James McVicar officiating. Burial will be in Rose Hill Cemetery, Wayne. Memorials may be made to Rock Valley Chapel, Beloit, Wis. Chaput-Buoy Funeral Home, 325 W. Sixth, Concordia 66901, is handling arrangements. 'The state of the church where memorials may be made was omitted in Friday's edition. Bobby Lee Wilson Jr. Bobby Lee Wilson Jr, 33, Salina, died Wednesday, May 2, 2001, at CLC of Salina. Mr Wilson was born Feb. 2, 1968, at Chicago and lived in Salina for 11 years. He was a cook. Survivors include his wife, Yvonne of the ,,_ ,,,,, , home; his par- MR. WILSON ents, Larry and Jeanette Kimbrough of Chicago; two sons, Bobby Lee III and Treondus Lee, both of the home; two daughters, Shaunice Wilson • of Salina and Deidre Robinson of Chicago; and a brother, Jermalne Kimbrough of Kentucky. The funeral will be at 2 p.m. Monday at Galsendorf-Rush Smith Funeral Home, 401 W. Iron, SaUna 67401, the Rev. Louis Winn officiating. Burial will b@ In Gypsum Hill Cemetery. Visitation will be from 1 to 8 p,m, Sunday and 9 a.m. to str- vlee time Monday at the funeral home where the family will receive Mends from 5 to a p.m. Sunday Both houses pass gas storage bill Gas explosions in Hutchinson lead to 'good bill' formulation By CAROL CRUPPER Harris News Service TOPEKA — A new gas storage law could be on its way to Gov Bill Graves today. On Friday, the Senate voted 39-1 to require Kansas to upgrade its gas storage regulations and establish a program to plug abandoned brine wells. House members followed suit late Friday night. Efforts to draft the legislation began shortly after natural gas explosions rocked Hutchinson in January It took months to work out the kinks. "It's a good bill," said Senate President Dave Kerr, R- Hutchinson. And, he said, he was pleased with how the House and Senate worked together Both chambers approved separate versions of the bill earlier in the session. The Friday votes approved a conference committee report that ironed out the differences. To draft new regulations and begin the program, the budget allocates $291,250 to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment and $300,000 to the Kansas Corporation Commission, with money generated through regulatory fees. The agencies had originally requested about $1 million. Sen. Tim Huelskamp, R- Meade, voted against the bill because of expense. The bulk of the bill changes how the state regulates the underground storage of natural and liquid petroleum gas. It makes Health and Environment responsible for regulating salt solution mining and aquifers and puts the KCC in charge of natural gas stored in abandoned oil and gas fields. It was the well-plugging part of the legislation that held up things The new law simply directs the state to develop a plugging program so money could be available at a future date. ON THE RECORD Animal shelter These animals were picked up May 3 at the locations listed and taken to the Salina Animal Shelter, 329 N. Second. Phone 826-6535. DOGS — Brown, black and white male Terrier mix, 700 block of East Republic; tan and silver male Yorkie with blue collar, 600 block of West Prescott; tan and black female German Shepherd with blue collar, 400 block of East Jewell. CAT — Black female shorthair, 300 block of South Eighth. €>#'©t)*^t )*Nuiiibers FRIDAY'S DRflWinie DAILY PICK 3 1-6-6 TODAFS SCRIPTURE But the meek will inlierit tlie land and enjoy great peace. — Psalms 37: 11 (NIV)

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