Iola Daily Register And Evening News from Iola, Kansas on January 5, 1909 · Page 1
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Iola Daily Register And Evening News from Iola, Kansas · Page 1

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Tuesday, January 5, 1909
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'It THE REGISTER HAS THE LARGEST BO^A-FIDE CIRCUIATION jOF ANY PAPER PUBLISHED IN ALLEN COUNtY, IG|liSAS, 1^ TOIJDME XI. SllMBER 59. KlfiHT P13ES. lOLA, KA5SA8, JANUARY "S; JMS^TUESDAY ETEXnTG. - JlJ • U6HT PAGES. niCB TWO COTIb Dl» NOT OUST THEM JITDGE OSCAR FOUST FI>»S FOR THE COUXTY COMMISSIONERS. CAME TO AN ABRUPT END STATK RESTED, DEFENSE SUBMIT. TKU ( ASE WITHOUT ARflI'MEXT TliH ('flnimlsHioDPnt Say Tlutt Thpjr .. A«-ti>iI on Ahie nnd Comprient Lfirul AdTkr. Aftf-r liParluK tlio cvidpnco In tho ouster procffdings Ijroiulu at?nln:it the Allen; county oominissloners, Judgf Oscar Foiist thin morning found for the defendants. The cajjft came fo a rather abrupt tonnination. Wh^n Assistant State ^httorncy General John Marshal announced that the state rested, A. H. Campbell, of the firm of Campbell & Gosbom. who represented the com- misaionfrs. withdrew th.'ir demurrer Introduced last evening and submitted the case to the court without ar gument. Mr. Marshal then stated that the state would make no argument, immediately following which Judge Foust gave his decision. The case was brought against the commissioners several months ago. They were charged with allowing bil's illeeally and with drawing money illegally. The legality of the morning paper as an official publication was a'ao questioned. Nearly :!00 bills were cited as having been illegally allowed, some becaii.se they were for "detective" hire, others because they were tor services of attorneys employed to assist the county attorney, and many others because they were not itemjzwi. of the commissioners testified in the case. One of the things charged against .Mr. Klein was that contrary t« law he sold material from his lumberiiyard to the county. He said on the^tand that be did sell some little material to the cotinty but be did HAS EVIDENCE NOW DECLARES MRS. MIXGLE, TO PROVE HUSBAXD'S IXXOCEXCE. Mm. LDCfofk, HMer of MurdfUNl Wc ninii, Still InMlNtN T|iat Mlni;le and I'arker Aro the Same. Wichita. Kas.. Jpn. Ti.—Mrs. Forest Mingle of this city believes that she haa secured evidence to prove thai her husband. Forest Mingle, did not lead a dual life, and that he is not Harry Parker, the man who killed .Mrs. Pearl Pearsoa In Oklahoma Clly September 10, last year. .Mingle if. now In Oklahoma C'liy. and he Is to be tried this month for ihe murder of Mrs. Pearson. Mrs. 0:ile Mnlnger of this city fornierl.v a servant in the home of J D. .Mann of lola, father of Ihe murdered woman, declares ihat .Mingle is not Hurry Parker, whom she knew well in Idla. She has never .seen Mingle, but she declare* his plcfuret- show that he is not Parker, altbouph here is a striking resemblance. Furher. she has received a letter from .Mrs. Uert I'arker. slster-In-la-v of H»ny Parker, who .say.s that Parker at liberiy. This letter Ivm l^een .«cnt to Ihe attorney for .Mingle. Mrs. I.ininj-'er also informed Mrs. .Minnie that she saw Harry Parker with .Miss iiaiay Mann In lola at the time .Mr. and .Mrs. .Minge were on their iKmeymcon trip in California. .Mrs-. Harry Parker lived in Arkansas City and came to Wichita when .Mingle was held in jail here. She failed to identify him as her husband. Those who did identify Mingle as Parker were the husband of the murdered woman and .1. I). .Mann of lola. he^ father. Mr.s. Liningor will go to Oklahoma City to testify in .Mingle'.^ behalf. AT CARLYLE TODAY OFFICERS OF LUMBERMAX'S PORT LAXD BUBT. WORK TO BEGIN AT ONCE A LARGE FORCE OF MEX TO PUSH WORK WITHOUT IXTERRUPTIO.V. The above dispatch was read over the phone this morning to .Mrs. C. C. iiccock. sister of the murdered wo- ian, and she stated that she could not recpli any .Mrs. Lininger ever having worked for her parents. She v.c ...» .—V oUgge.Hied that the woman might have not know that he was violating the jworked for her people at one time biu law. if b" did violate it. Imarrled sinje. .Mrs. Luccock a.so says It was also charged against the commissioners that the.v had drat*'_n the maximum, $600 per year from th'e coimty. In addition to mileage, without having put in the required number of days for that amount. They answered to' this that thev had acted on able and competent legal advice which privilege is granted them un der another provision relating to the duties and remuneration of tho commissioners. With th<' exception of one instance the coniniissloners acted on the advice of the county attorney. With reference to falling to Itemize certain bil's. the comtnlssloners claim they thought *.h<» bills they allowed were legal. They also said that in allowing bills for detective hire and legal asslRtanre for Ihe county attorney they had acted on able and competent legal advice. The slate really closed Its case last Might. A demurrer of the defense was argued but not ruled on last night. However, when court convened this morning the state re-opened Its case and put on several witnesses. There was some talk that an ac? tion would be brought against the commissioners to compel them to refund certain fees they are charged with taking Illegally, but J. R. Miller •who helped in the prosecution would ncit say today what action would be taken, if anv. I that she knows that there is a Harry Parker, other than .Min.gle whom she and lur peop e always knew 'under that name.Jiut says he is not the same man her murdered sister knew under ih;it name and has no connection with iho ca«e. She Inslsis that .Mingle Is the right man and that the evidence will nhow It. A COLD WAVE CAME l.« a Difference of 41 Degrees Temperature Since Yesterday. In Ye-sterday es-ening at 5:40 o'clock Local Weather Otiserver Schoppe re^ ceived a warning to the effect that a cod wave was scheduled to arrive in this ciiy within the next twenty-four hours, and that a drop of thirty degrees F\ahrenheii would be noticeable. The Wave has arrived on schedule time. At four -oclock yesterday afternoon the thermometer at the local weather bureau registered H" degrees Fakreuhelt and at eight o'clock this morning the indicator read sixteen, making a difference of forty-one degrees In the t{m|)erature. The predictions for this evening are, snow with a rising temperature tomorrow. Mr. Schoi)pe saya that his barometer Is unsteady, indicating that the snow will be here as predicted, hut in case the snow falls to arrive a much greaier drop in the temperature will occur tomorrow morning. M'KEEVER WILL TALK TO SCHOOL TEACH ER8 SATURDAY MORNING, Will Deliver Lecture Under Auspices of the Lecture Course Saturday Niqht. PROTEST AGAINST BARNES LAW. Petitions BelP7 Circulated Among the Tax Payers. Parties interested In the repeal of the Barnes High School law are circulating a petition among the tax payers of the county aaking that the state legislature repeal, the law. The pellUons will be forwarded to the members of the legislature at the coming •eaxioo. The petition states that ID the opinion of the aignera the law is unittst to some while .at the aame time there are no benefits to he derived from its enactment The teache.-s of Tola and the Y. M. C. A. lecture committee have been fortunate in securing Prof. William A. McKeever of Manhattan Agricultural college to come to lola and deliver his famous Ipcturo on ".Moral Delinquents." The professor will lecture to the lola teachers at the high school building. Saturday. January 9. at 2:30 p. m. His subject is "The Psychic Influence of the Teacher.-' This lecture will 'be free to all who wish to atfnd. In the evening at S o'clock Prof. McKeever will lecture at the Presbyterian church on '.Moral Delinouents." The teachers have arranged with the lecture course committee to give complimentary tickets to all school children from the 4th grade to tho 8th grade Inclusive. All holders of season tickets will be nassed in on their tickets. fJene-ai admission ten cents. It Is not the Idea to make money out of this lecture, but to give to the peop'e of Tola something In'^resfln<» and Instructive. The small admlsnlon is to hein nay expenses. The following nress renorts indicate what nn excellenf address is in store for lolan:!: John .MacTTonnld In Western School .rournal: "Professor McKeever gave a fine address on 'ISmotlonallsm.' He is growing In strength and T>opular- tfv evprv yepr and there are m^re cat's for him than he cm answer. He Is hMlnfni hu^noroop and elnnuent. Hill rity Renubl'can: "Profecsor ^feKe)•ver is » v<»rv ontertalnlnr; sneaker, and exceedingly witlv. Indeed a marc interesting nr-i In-^fruct- Ive lecture wai never delivered he- fore a gathering of Hill City people." TRAIX IXTO OPEX SWITCH. Englnm and Flr*">»»i Were Inwtantl.r KIIM. TiMnf'npton. W. Va.. Jan. 5—A fnat fivln» Virgiplnn -t^i^wiiger train on •be Cbesaneake and Ohio railrosd ran •"to nn open {twitch eaHv to^"v at f^nertct. revantv rni'es e <»»t of here. The train went hnr'ing'into the sMe ,c>f 8te«»n AmhankioMit Thomas Ki- I wards, enelneer. and P«»«e" Trent, fire {man. were Instantly killed. Santa Fe Enirlne^n Snrveflng for Its Storage Tracks and .SwKclieN for Cejnent Plant. Mr. W. B. Woods, president of the Lumbermen's Portland Cement company. Mr. Victor Beutner, constructlen engineer of the company's cement plant. y,Xr. B. W. Ballou. construction engineer of its brick plant, and Mr. J. R. I .4import, superintendent of brick nlnnt construction, are at Carlyle today, where active work on both plants will begin at once. With the parly are engineers of the Atchison. Topeka & Santa Fe Railway company, .surveying for its storage tracks and 8 »vJtches for the cement plant. The sAitch for the brick plant was built some time aso and is now being used for receiving brick, sand 2nd other materia' to he used in the construction work. Mr. Wood states that the nre.sent supply of material on the ground and other material and machinery under con'.r,ict will enable a large force of men to vork without interruption. The brick nlant building will be a fi-e proof brick and iron structure, and the machinery electrical power eouip- ped. the power being transmitted from central power plant, work unon which wf'I be completed by the time the brick plant is readv for operation, which will be within the next three or four months. With the conservative policy char- a'-toristic of the Lumbermen people, they have quietly carried on their plans and purnoses until they arc now ready and able, so they state, to build and under favorable weather conditions and prompt delivery of material and machinery, the work will be ptish ed as fast as possib'e, until the products of both cement and brick plants nvf on the market. 'A COUNTY CAMPAIGN REVIYAIS SIMULTAXEOUSLT IX THREE PRIXCIPAL CITIES. THE \n;ATlfER. Forecflfit for Kansas i—^Snow tonight and »'cdnoNdayt rfdlnr tempemture n'ednPMdiiy. Data recorded at local office V. S. Weather Uurenu, yesterday, today nnd a year ago. ,lunnBr}- 4. Ve.iterdtiy. V r.r, ..... .-ii; ::•.) . 0 Ago .-.0 .-.0 42 i ji. in. . t II. III. . (i p. in. . 5 p. ni. . 10 p. Ill 12 mldnlfht Maximum temperature .Minimum leniDerature Precijiitatlon 7 p. ni. January :>. Toda.v. Yr. Ago a-a. m r.4 2.0 4 a. ni 19 29 6 a. in 17 29 8 a. m 16 2S 10 a. m 19 ."..'> 12 noon 24 42 Preclpitaiion 7 a. ni. ... 0 0 HELLK FOERAL SERVICE TODAY, Burial 0/ Well Known Allen Connfjr .Man at Humlioldl. The funeral of (Irorge Helle, who ilfd at li!« home In Humboldt Sunday ni'irnlng, was held this afiernwn u Ihe Humboldt Methodist church. Mr. Melle WHS well known In this city and lis siidedn death was a shock to many friends. The Hu'niboldt Herald says: The death of Oeorge Hello was caused by toxaemia, u condition of poisoning by contaminated blood. Oeorge had been at home for sev- ral weeks visiting, his parents. He had not been feeling wei) for some line but did not complain of being III. 'hrlstmas he was taken sick with n fever but nothing serious Has looked for and he was Improving slightly. His death was unexperrfed by his friends as he was a young man of fine health and seemingly had years of life before him. George was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. C. F". Helle. Hesldes his iiarenis he leaves several brothers and sisters to mourn his los^ He was Imrn on the farm north of town and has spent the greaier part of his life n and near Humboldt. For two or hree years he has been away and during the past year he was employed n Chicago. Funeral services will will be held at the Methodist church Tuesday afternoon at SJ.IO. $800,000 FOR ITALY PRESIDt'XT ROOSETELT SIOXS BILL PASSED BY BOTH HOUSE.S. 101 A, GAS CITY AND UHARPE SERVICES BEGAX IX LA HAHPE M E. CHURCH lAST XlfiHT. .Mretlngs.Iii Uas nnd lola Begin Xext Monday Xlght—What If Hnmlwldt nnd Elsmore Should Line Up? Chrtrs and Ilandclapping by .Mem. hers of CongrcN .N as Mvm-axp Was Kea.;. • Washington, Jan. .').—President Roosevelt this afternoon signed the bill passed by congress apiiropriat- ing J800 000 for the relief of the earth quake sufferers. In the house there was vigorous hand clapping as the bill carrying'Ihe appropriation of $800,000 was granted almost imniediijie;y after the reception In buili houses of a me.tsage from the president culling atientloii lo the culumify. Only the fact that congress was ad- JiMirned for the holiday recess when Ihe earih<iunk(' occurred prevented ear'ler action, although by the president 's direction and with confidence of (•otigressionai upproviit siipplleK aboard Ihe naval ships Celtic and Cul- Koa. intended for the battleship fleet, were diverted nnd ordered delivered a» quickly as their sjieed capacity would take them to tho scene of suffering and want. No such generous he n ever w,i« exfende<I to n stricken people by this government before. ZEKE MOORE WINS IX THE (J1-E>X POOL OIL CASE BEFORE JUIKJE CAMPBELL. Court Holds That All louses Are luralld Except Ihe Litchfield Lease. Register Want Ads Bring Results. Big Land Deal. J. H. Fry has sold to J. C. Kverett 2S7 acres of land in the northwest corner of the county for $17,280. TO DIRECT WORK RepretenUtlve of Treasury Department Here To Inspect PostofHce Job. R. W. Ba-r, a superintendent of construction from the treasury department of the United States, arrived In Tola from Wichita this morning am) will look after the government's interest In the construction of the new post office building at Walnut and West streets. He spent the day looking over the plans for the buPdIng and inspecting the work now under way. In company with ,T. F. Relmllnger, a construction superintendent In the employ of Dieter ft Wenzel, who have the --•'tract for the erection of the new building, he discussed details of the building and was made acquainted with conditions locally. Mr. Ban- received a telegram yesterday announclns bis assignment to the lola lob and came here Imnedlate- ly to look over tbe work. He Is also Buperintending the erection of a government bni'dins In WIchiU and will divide ills time as ooeasioo demands between this citjr and Wichita. Muskogee. Okla.. Jan. .">.—In the fed eral court today -ludge Campbell held that all alleged sales and leases signed by Zokc .Moore, a Oreek freedman. to land in the Olenn Pool ol! district of Oklahoma, are invalid except one lease ccvering n period of fifteen years given to R. S. Litclifleld who is supposed, to represent the Standard Oil company. The land Is worth a half million dollars and by the aViove decision, .Moore \vlll secure ten per cent of the niyalty t.n all oil taken from the wells on land under th.' Utchfield lease. MAY BE NEW TRIAL standard Oil Case to Be Rcdorketed Says Attorney Sims.. Chicago. Jan. r>.—United States District Alorney Sims today made his .first comment nn yesterday's decision of the supreme court In the twenty- nine million dollar fine case. "The big case will be re-docketed within'a few days." said he. "and may be on trial witlhn the next two weeks." To Sell Estate. Parties interested in the estate of the late John Swansen were at the office of the probate Judge today to arrange for the sale of a part of the estate. The deal has not been cloaed but the terms have been agreed npon. If the (ifvil laughed In fiendish glee when he learned that the Rev William A. Sunday, the noted base hall evangelist, could not possibly come to lola. In any reasonable length of time, his satisfaction is ill-advised. There has been a spontaneous discovery among lola preachers that a religious upheaval may be hoped for, even though Rev. William A. he not present. 1 Unconsciously, perhaps, a sort of concerted move asainst sin in all Its forms has begun in Allen county. The opening gun in what promises to be one of the most effective religious campaigns the county has ever known was fired in LaHarpe last night, when Rev. Benham. pastor of the Methodist church, began a. series of revival meetings which is to last indeflnitel.v. Rev. Benham will do the preaching and Deaconess Miss Bessie Crandall wi'l have charg^ of the singing. Prayerful preparation had been made for this meeting arid great results are looked for. j Xext Monday night in Gas City, re vival services will begin. Rev. R. H. EUett. pastor of the Tola Christian church, will be! the evangelist. The Presbyterians and the Christian church people have united in the Gas revival and services will alternate weekly between the Presbyterian church and the Christian church. Spec ial prayer services in preparation for the revival are being held In Gas City homes this week. • On next Monday night also, reviv at services to continue indefinitely win begin in the First Presbyterian church in lola. Dr. S. S. Hllscher, pastor, win have charge of the meetings, but Rev. Jarvis, pastor of the Presbyterian church in Winfleld, Ks., Is to do the preaching. Preparations for this revival are also under way and the church expects to receive a great blessing. -With revivals going on In three prlnclpa cities In Allen county,—^Tola. I>aHnrpe and Gas Clly. there ought to bo a religious awakening of no small coiisequence in Allen county. There are several special meetings In progress In the rural districts and If the churches in Savonburg. Wsmore nnd Humboldt should fall IQ line with the movement there would hardly be n spot In the county where Satan could light. AN HEIR DISAPPEARED. Now Sarah Runyan Brings Quiet Title. Suit to Sarah S. Runvan et al brought suit In district court today against Clement Runyan fo qu'et the title to S M N E lA. and the N >A of S E Vi and all of the N W% 8-25-19. and three lots in lAHarpo. It seems that the defendant, along with the plaintiffs, is heir to the above propertv. but his whei-eabouts is unknown. Years ago. according to the petifion. he went west. The last his people heard of him was in August. 1897. They advertised in the l^s Angeles and S.nn Francisco papers for him. several years ago. but received no rep'y. They now bring the suit to settle up the estate. Commissioners Meeting. The county commissioners are meeting in their January session this afternoon. They have taken up the time in iirowing bills. Several matters of importance will come up before the session cirses. OPEN BRANCH HODSE Kahmann-Miller Commission People Open up in the Gard-Tasgat Building. The Kahmann-Miller commission company of Kansas City, has opened a branch house In this city located on West street adjacent to the building now occupied by the Gard-Taggart commission company. The new firm will be managed for the present by Mr. O. G. Miller, a member of the firm. Poultry, eggs, butter, hides and all kinds of game will be handled by the new Arm. MRS. RAXKIX AT TRIAL. Her First Apnearanre Since Xlgbt- Rlder Case Was Befun. Union City. Tenn.. Jan. 5.—Ftor the first time during the trial of the night riders. Mrs. Quentin Rankin, widow of the man for whose murder eirht alleged night riders are now on trial, was in court tctday when the ar> gnments were began. Major Hal Holmes opened for the state. "INSULTED AGAIN" SOME MEMBERS AROUSED BY THE PRESIDEXT'S SECOXD MESSAGE. ''Xow He Calls Us Fools," Says Gen eral Keller and OtJiers Make Similar Remark.*. Washington, Jan. 5—Numerous mem bers of the house were clutrging up and down last night asserting that copgress was "Insulted" again yesterday by the president. 'In the first message," exclaimed tho venerable General Kelfer of Ohio, In the full glory of that dress suit that ha wears from breakfast to bed, "he called us all knaves. .\ow he adds that we are fools." "Rascals or fools Is all you can make of it," was the corroborative commcpt of Representative Kuhn of California. Their reference, of course, was Ir. the president's remark that many of them had voted blindly to restrict the use of Ihe secret service, in accordance with the recommendation of Taw ney of .Minnesota and Smith of iowa. .Vu .Vpology, Mann Says. Reiireaentative .Mann of Illinois took comfort in the thought that the president had intended to come as near to an apology as he could, while one eminent statesman found consolation in the assertion that the president hadn't produced a bit of evidence "that would be accepted in a court of law." Representative Perkins of New York announced that he would get his committee on the message into conference today, when the situation would be carefully canvassed and the committee, at the proper time, w^ould be ready to make such recommendations as it should deem. etc.. etc. Nobody knows, of course, what the committee will do. though there i» a widespread opinion that it might find It cciivenient to do nothing. But no matter what the course of the committee be. the main point has been strong made by the president and the counir>'s attention has been directed to it. and that point Is: Will congress be big enough to admit its error in hampering the use of the iecrei service In the interest of criminals? Mr. Roosevelt's Stand. This is the question on which the president Is tremendously in earnest. He has let It be known that if congress will only re-establish the secret service on a basis of broad uaefii'.ness for th(! detection of crime wherever it may exist in the government service, he is willing that the action may be iccompaiiled with any rebuke to him hat the legislative branch may care to administer. He is quite willing to make the trade and sign any measure that may be adopted. SdOGKS CONTINUE HEATIEB qUAIES ABE FELT MORE FBEQUEXTLt AT HIGHT. DISTRIBUTE 30,00(^ RATIONS APPEALS FOB AID HEARD FROM BENEATH THE BUIXS. KefugrvN Cry for Bread While Ctmptd Short Distance From Grore of Ripe Frttl^ HAINS ON STAND HAYS HIS tax WAS POIXTED AT KORERTS, OXI.Y. Declares That He .Saw Funke and Andrew.s on the Boat for FIr.tt Time. Fluthlng. N. Y'.. Dec. .5.—Testifying his own defense today. Thornton Halns declared that the only person he pointed bis revolver at during the time of the shooting of William E. Annis was Charles Roberts. He denied Ihat he bad asked any of the club members to come to the dock for Annis and stated that he had never seen I-'unke or Andrews unfit he saw them on the float. The defendant said he went to Bay- ide to look at real estate on August 5. and had no idea that his brother as arnjed. or knew that .^nnis was at the yacht club. He told the Jury that all the shots had been fired by Captain Halns before he rushed to the float to protect his brother from John Tonning. the boatman, and club members, who he said, he lielieved would harm the capt-ain. Hains denied that he pointed a revolver at Mrs. Annis. The defendant stated that he had no idea how many shots Captain Hains had fired and when Charles Roberts. _ club member, picked the revolver up and the muzzle of the weapon pointed at him he drew his own revolver and told Roberts not to shoot. TO CONTEST WITH ERIE. lola High School Arranges For Basket Ball Game. The lola High School basket ball team has arranged for a gome with the E^rle High School team to be played Friday evening In the local Y. M. A. building. The Erie team has a reputation for fast playing and a good game is anticipated. To Hold Examination. An examination for the position of rural route mail carrier Is to be held by the examining board of the tola post office on January 9. There is n vacano' in lioth lola and Humboldt There are a number of applicants for the Humboldt position. Reglflter Wast Ada Briac Reaalti. Messina. Jan. The earthqooke shocks still continue here although they are rapidly diminishing in intensity. The heavier shocks continue at night and are more frequently felt than in the day time. The fires In the .-ity are being gradually extlngui^ed ind will soon be under control. Thirty thousand rations were distributed among the sufferers yeater^ Jay by the several relief committees .low at work. Reggion and Vallla San Giovanni are now practically deserted with the exception of the troops of jailors and soldiers who are guarding he-ruins. A large number of persons A -ere taken from beneath the ruins to- iay while the voices of others who are buried in the ruins coti^ be distinctly heard appealing for aid. Many pitiful sights al-e to be seen in the camps of the refugees. A number of; persons threw themselves on their knees beg- ^ng for bread while within a few minutes walk of the camps are orange groves rich with-ripe fruit. Home, Jan. 5.—The minister of marine has received advices that QUi Lipari islands have suffered practically no damage from earthquake stiocks. Telegraphic communication, however, has been/'-interraitted betwen these islands and SlclJy. , Ambassador Oriiconi delivered t<>~' Coiint Taverna, bM|d .of t)i| Italia^ Red Cross sodety^,',^ million dollars'" from the American 'Red Cross society. Connt,T »jfefn« /waa- overwhelmedaM said*Iw^-'iMnM^biiace an.aM^t|im t«; the nile whfch forbids th* of money through any .ei Cross channe's, and rethf imbassador $2,000 which rlbuted to the expensei of th§ 4hip. The count added that <Mid . he greatest difficulties to be-encoiilit^ ered is the prompt distribution of nOj- plies and therefore outside help ik warmly welcomed. Embassador Griscom and the tatin* bers of the American relief committee! have signed a contract for the ac- lul'sltlon of the Austrian Lloyd steamship Oceania for two weeks. Th* steamer is of 6.000 tons and can ac- coiiimodate 1,400 steerage and 10 flrat cabin ])a8senger8. It Is now belniT fitted out and when ready 10,000 persons can be taken care of aboard fpr ten da >-M. In addition food supplies will be distributed ashore to several thousand persons. Willie King Victor Emmanuel waia :naklng a parting vi^t ashore Just tie- fore his departure from Messina, he saw a demonstration by crazed refugees near the marble landing stai^ used on ceremonial occasions. Soldiers were landing bedding and blank- ?fs for distribution among the survivors of the catastrophe when a gronp of refugees l>egan clamoring for bedding and were soon Joined by bun- - dreds of others. When forced back as gently as possible they shouted violent remonstrations against the officers. BAGGED 256 RABBITS Ray Cummins and Mr. Fosh Make Fine Record Hunting Yesterday. Ray Cummins and a Mr. Foshmeier' claim to be the champion rabbit hunters of the county. Yesterday they', dtrve out'south of Piqtia and bocied 256 "bunnies". They hunted for about eight hours. Today they peddled fh* rabbits about town. They believe tliey^:, have made the best record of the sea- 3(M1. T^VO SERVICES AGAIX TOHIGHll. Prajrrr Xectlairs to Be Led ky Ber. Garfield and Rev. XbuMm Two services in observance of the week of prayer were held in lola last night. One was in the Trinity Methodist church in East lola and another lit the United Brethren church. The meeting In the East lola church was wellcattended and was led by lUv. R. H.! Gllett. pastor of the Christian church. Dr. S. S. Hllscher. pastor of the Presbyterian church, was the lead jpr ai the meetli^ in the V. R ebnrclt and there was a good attendance. Botli meetings were full of spiritual interest. Tomlght there'. will again be two servieea. One is to be in the Reformed church, where Rer. O. iOmxaofe. paatpr of the Ui B. church, will ted. andf.aaother In'the Obrfstiaa Aardi. He »/.W. Hr Oirfleld, pwtor .-of the Baptist, ehurchi will be the IsaJer. - Tlieiw .ifieetinKS wlU begin at T^he] p^plei bi^jthe city are tovlted |e': attend aaid |t.la'sn«snted that tiMf gPtP-.the,meeting lit the chnrcb <^idratljr iQcatad.

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