The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas on October 20, 1996 · Page 15
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas · Page 15

Publication:
Location:
Salina, Kansas
Issue Date:
Sunday, October 20, 1996
Page:
Page 15
Start Free Trial
Cancel

THE SALINA JOURNAL LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1996 B3 MILESTONES 50 YEARS AGO — Edna Nelson and Robert Boss Mr. and Mrs. Bob Boss 50 YEARS AGO — May Howard and Lloyd Judd Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Judd 50 YEARS AGO — Dean Bogart and Eva French Mr. and Mrs. Dean Bogart Golden occasion to honor Bosses of Solomon Judds of Lincoln to observe golden date BENNINGTON — The Pepper- pot, 104 E. Bennington, is to be the scene of a 2 to 4 p.m. 50th wedding anniversary open house Oct. 27 for Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. "Bob" Boss, 469 N. 260th Road, Solomon, KS 67480. All friends and relatives are invited. The honorees request no gifts. Hosts are their three children, and their spouses: Barbara and David Powell of East Granby, Conn., Pat and Steve Bogarts of Salina to have golden day Mr. and Mrs. George Chase 50th event for Chases r COURTLAND — A 2 to 4 p.m. golden wedding anniversary open house for Mr. and Mrs. George Chase is scheduled Oct. 27 at the Community Building. Mrs. Chase is the former Opal Jean "Jean" White. Entertaining for all friends and relatives will be the honorees' three sons, and their wives: J.C.F. and Carol of Salina and Kent and Cathy and Paul and Jana of Republic. There are 12 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. The Chases were married Oct. 31,1946, in Esbon and since have lived in Courtland. He has been in the service station business for more than 50 years. His wife has been a public librarian for 22 years. They request no gifts. Greenways mark 50th PHOENIX — Former Beverly, Kan., residents Mr. and Mrs. Robert Greenway are to observe their golden wedding anniversary with a 1 to 4 p.m. open house Nov. 2 at their home, 18822 N. 25th Way, Phoenix, AZ 85024. Entertaining will be the couple's two daughters, Bonnie Hathaway, and her husband, Dean, and Judy Hines of Phoenix. Their four granddaughters will assist. The marriage of Greenway and the former Deloris Pierce was solemnized Nov. 3,1946, in Lincoln, Kan.. They previously lived in rural Beverly. 95th card shower set for Mary Zeigler '; A card shower is slated Oct. 29, 'in observance of the 95th birth: day of Salinan Mary Zeigler, 700 E, Wilson. ,", The celebrant's two daughters are Marva Lee Doud, 700 E. Wilson, and Geo Norris of Osborne. - She was born Mary Netherland Oct. 29,1901, in Codell. & » C designs by arlson Come see our... • Wedding Stationery • Enclosures • Napkins • Thank You Notes • Reception Items • Bridal Books • Attendants Gifts SUPERIOR SCHOOL & OFFICE A Division of Superior School Supplies, Inc. 214 S. Santa Fe Downtown Salina 913-8254641 Baccus of Minneapolis and Bob and Renee of Bennington. There are six grandchildren and three step-grandchildren. The marriage of Boss and the former Edna Nelson was solemnized Oct. 27, 1946, in Ada. The couple since have lived in rural Bennington where he is a farmer- stockman. Boss also is a U.S. Army veteran of World War II. His wife was a secretary for Production Credit Association and First National Bank; she is now reitred. Mary Bell to have reception on her 90th All friends and relatives of Sali- nan Mary W. Bell are invited to a 2 to 4 p.m. 90th birthday reception for her Saturday, Oct. 26, in the dining room of Salina's Presbyterian Manor, 2140 E. Crawford, where she also resides. Hosts are the celebrant's two daughters, Cathy Farr and Judy Ewalt of Salina. Her granddaughters will assist. There are five grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Born Mary White Oct. 26,1906, in Topeka, she lived in Hutchinson before moving to Salina in 1939. Mrs. Bell was a bookkeeper for Safeway Stores, Pyle Elevator Co., Wyatt Grain Co., Kansas Wesleyan University and Evans Grain Co., retiring in 1981. She now volunteers in the children's department at the Salina Public Library. The honoree requests no gifts. MARY BELL Wedding anniversaries and birthdays of persons 80 years and older are published in the Sunday edition. The deadline is noon Thursday. Forms are available at The Journal office, 333 S. Fourth, detailing all information the staff needs to write the announcement. Pictures (of couples married 50 years or more) should be 3-by 5- inch black and white glossy prints. Photos also may accompany birthday announcements. Snapshots, however, will not be accepted. , Photos will be returned by mail after publication only; they no longer are available for pick up at the Journal office. Connection • Largest Internet Network In Kansas • Toll Free Customer Service Available 7 Days Per Week! • Security Expertise... Web Development... Software... Dedicated Access...Education! 1-913-823-3565 www.net*p«6«onUn«.com NETSPACE i N Tf» N£T »g jt VI CIS torporate Office: Salina, I LINCOLN — Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Franklin Judd, 912 N. Second, are to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary Oct. 27 with their family. They have three daughters, and their husbands: Linda and Steve Bray of Great Bend; Connie and Delbert Liggett of Lincoln, and Kelli Judd of V CIVILITY Tamarac, Fla. There are four grandchildren. Judd and the former May Louise Howard were united in marriage Oct. 27, 1946, in Salina. He is a retired plumber, electrician and postal employee. His wife retired as a beautician. The couple live in Lincoln but spend their winters in Yuma, Ariz. A family dinner is planned to observe the 50th wedding anniversary of Salinans Mr. and Mrs. Dean Bogart (Eva French), 508 Martin. They have two children, Steve, and his wife, Anita, of rural Abilene and Rhonda Wray of Newton. There are five grandchildren. The Bogarts exchanged wedding vows Oct. 27, 1946, in Abilene and since have lived in Salina. He retired from the U.S. Postal Service. His wife retired from Phillips Lighting Co. 100th celebration planned to honor Lizzie Bolte Rude behavior: Has it become nation's norm? National poll shows Americans fear we've given up on manners By ERIC ADLER Kansas City Star KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Pardon us, but what's become of Ameri-. ca's manners? Baseball star Roberto Alomar spits in an umpire's face. Political candidates call one another names. Almost every once-forbidden word pops up on prime-time television. Across' the country, observers say, myriad signs point to a nation^ caught up in an uncivil war. Teachers talk about disrespectful students. Students complain of deprecating instructors. Most any American can quickly recount an anecdote of, say, a rude clerk, a belittling customer, a disparaging co-worker or some other boorish or humiliating public encounter. It's hard to track growth in uncivilized behavior. And, certainly, there are signs that public discussion about civility is prompting moves to more civil behavior in some quarters. But polls show most Americans think incivility has spread like a malignant growth. A nationwide poll of 1,005 adults conducted earlier this year for U.S. News and World Report found that 89 percent of Americans considered incivility to be a serious national problem; 78 percent thought incivility had worsened in the last 10 years. Of those who §j Light the Way 1 to Your think civility has declined, between 84 percent and 91 percent think that decline has helped foster violence, divide the national community and erode values. "We see very few polite criminals," said Jackson County Prosecutor Claire McCaskill. "The fact that our society does not put an emphasis on manners and etiquette and civility, I think you can attribute some crime to that — particularly crime that occurs along the fine line of just being angry and being violent." "I think when you are taught manners, you're taught that there are polite ways to deal with your anger and impolite ways. Cursing someone out, using epithets are impolite ways to deal with your anger. Conversation and accommodation and maybe avoidance are the appropriate ways." Some people are getting the 'message about civility. Books are now being published on the subject. In corporate America the mantra of "customer service" repeats ever louder. And, heeding voters' complaints about negative campaigning, the candidates made the recent debates so harmonious some pundits complained they were positively dull. of a Lifetime with Our Diamond Bracelets. Its our exclu- ^ sive diamond Add-A-Link with N a most unique , new design: brill- \^ iant-cut diamonds ^' s ' tl * set in precious ' -' 14 karat gold, art- ' \ fully sculptured for , a compelling look 'v Here is jewelry that , truly stands for the •> treasured memories i ot a lifetime. You can start with two links and add more lor any special occasion Or, still better, give hei the complete bracelet at once like putting the world at her feel Surprisingly affordable for such luxury loo $1,121.00 12:t N. Santa Fe Dowittowit Saliinu 013-H25-O531 LINCOLN — In observance of the 100th birthday of Lizzie Bolte, a 2 to 4 p.m. open house is scheduled Oct. 27 in the long-term care unit of the Lincoln County Hospital. All friends and relatives are invited. Hosts are two of the honoree's grandchildren and a niece: Kenneth Bolte of Lucas and Sharon Snyder of Leavenworth, and their families, and Edna Han- son, and her husband, Rueben, of Wichita. Assisting will be staff members of the long-term care unit. There are four grandchildren and two step-grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren and one step-great-grandchild. Born Lizzie Meier Oct. 27,1896, in Lincoln County, she was married 71 years to Carl Bolte. Both worked a number of years at the Lincoln County Hospital. WORLD'S GREATEST HAIRCUT EVERYDAY! SniPfTQiP FAM5LY HAIRCUT SHOPS GALAXY CENTER 825-4054 (Across From Central Mall) Open Nights and Sundays—Just Drop In! COMPLETE WITH CUT! Long Hair Extra FALL SHOPPING SPREE NOW THROUGH OCTOBER 28 To apply for a JCPenney Card, aek any Sale* Anoclate lor an application. You may oven be eligible lor Inatant credit. "Additional 10% off women's apparel and women's shoe prices.

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free