The Ottawa Herald from Ottawa, Kansas on March 16, 1963 · Page 8
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The Ottawa Herald from Ottawa, Kansas · Page 8

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Ottawa, Kansas
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Saturday, March 16, 1963
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Page 8
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•W >< / t Xc TOE OTTAWA HERALD Saturday, March 16, 196? Use Rats In Chemistry Study By LOIS SMITH A rumor that rats inhabit Ward Science Hall, Ottawa University, is true. However, the animals are there by intent. Two senior research class members, Dennis Powers and Kent Stevenson, are using them for a study of the relationship of diet fat to blood cholesterol. Dennis has divided the 16 albino rats into four groups. The control group receives a normal diet of pet food. The others receive a diet of skim milk fortified with vitamins and oils mixed, which contains 50 per cent fat by weight. One group receives highly saturated fat, another moderately saturaged fat and the third a highly unsaturated fat. Before being placed on the special diets, the rats were all fed the same diet for a few days to stabilize their weights. Dennis then ran cholestrol tests and began the special feedings. The projects of feeding and testing the rats will continue for six or seven weeks with blood testing at about one-week intervals. The color density test for blood fat is only one type of test being carried out. Later along in the project, Dennis will sacrifice and dissect the| animals and analyze the tissues. This time of testing the animals and recording the results is producing pages of facts and figures which will be recorded in graphs and charts. Kent's chief part of the project is concerned with a comparison of methods. He will do several kinds of analyses and compare the different methods to see how they check out on the same rats. The specially - bred rats from an experimental laboratory in Kansas City are all from the same lineage. They were about % months of age at the start which compares with middle age in humans. "It takes about an hour a day to feed the rats and weigh them — more at the start of the project," says Dennis. "We've named them all and notice they have definite personalities. They are all tame and like attention." The instructor, Elizabeth Clairborne, points out that it was necessary to buy only hail screen and pie tins to make the cages. Feed cups are porcelain laboratory dishes, and the water bottles and drinking tubes were also lab equipment. "We feel that this sort of thing is valuable to a student," Miss Clairborne says. "The purpose is to give the student an opportunity to use research tech* niques and procedures and to use some original ideas." Dennis says that although the experimental idea may not be original, he has directed his procedure along different lines from similar projects. During the first semester he did research on the subject in Linda Hall library, Kansas City, and in KU Science library. "I hope to study medicine," Dennis says. "Blood cholesterol is a highly controversial subject of great interest to the medical profession and laymen. Although this research is not an authentic study on the subject, I feel that it is good training as premedical study." Both Dennis and Kent are chemistry majors. Name State Masonic Officers WICHITA (AP)-Ben. W. Graybill, Shawnee Mission, was installed Thursday as grand master of the Kansas Masonic Grand lodge as the 107th annual communication closed. Willard E. Bradford, Wamego, started in the official line as deacon. Other officers installed: Arthur C. Hodgson, deputy grand master, Lyons; Owen E. Hodgson, grand senior warden, Salina; William E. Montgomery, grand junior warden, Syracuse; Floyd A. Palmer, treasurer, Independence; Charles S. McGinnes secretary, Topeka; Forrest D. Haggard, chaplain, Overland USE RATS IN CHOLESTEROL STUDY — Ottawa University students Kent Stevenson (left) and Dennis Powers are pictured with some of the white rats used in study of relationship of diet fat to blood cholesterol. (Herald Photo). Adult Classes Are Popular By DICK CRAWFORD WILLIAMSBURG -Adult night classes are not a new thing at Williamsburg High School, but the response to announcements that classes will be held at night each year brings a fairly consistent number of people to the •chool for enrollment. This year 41 adults signed up for classes in typing, welding and a young farmers class. The typing class has been taught for several years and the other two classes date back to the early 1950s. Earl Anderson, vocational agriculture teacher at Williamsburg High, began teaching the young farmers class nine years ago. Two years later he started the welding class. Anderson has found great satisfaction in the night courses. "The opportunity to spread ourselves outside of day school NO HUNTING WITH THE PECKING - Shirley McCormack, Williamsburg High School typing teacher, looks over shoulder of adult night student, Mrs. Forrest Bond. (Herald Photo). KOFO Schedule 4 f V 'I. 7:00 7:00 7:15 7:30 7:40 7:45 8:00 8:30 8:40 8:00 8:15 8:30 . 8:35 10:00 11:00 12:00 12:05 12:30 12:45 1:00 1:30 1:35 2:00 3:30 1:35 8:00 8:00 8:30 8:30 8:35 8:45 8:50 7:00 7:05 7:15 7:30 7:40 7:45 7:50 8:00 8:10 8:30 8:40 8:00 8:15 8:30 8:35 10:00 10:15 10:30 10:35 11:00 11:05 11:30 11:35 11:00 12:05 13:16 »:2ft SUNDAY KOFO AM AND FM AM-FM Sign On Easy Melodies Easy Melodies News Weather Forecasts Hymn Time Centropolis Baptist Church News and Weather Easy Melodies Family Worship Hour The Christophers News and Weather Easy Melodies First Baptist Church First Methodist Church Highlights of Weeks News Music from the Masters News Piano Notes Sunday Serenade News and Weather Sunday Serenade Music from Mt. Oread News and Weather Sunday Serenade MONDAY THRU F KIDAT KOFO AM AND FM FM Sign on Top of the Morning AM Sign On News and Weather Top of the Morning Weather Round up, Mkts. Top of the Morning Agricultural Markets Top of the Morning Top of the Morning News Top of the Morning Weather Forecasts Top of the Morning Bports Round Up Top of the Morning News and Weather Top of the Morning Morning Devotions KOFO Serenade News and Weather KOFO Serenade Mary Blalne Time KOFO Serenade News and Weather KOFO Serenade Bulletin Board Around Town News and Weather KOFO Serenade People's Exchange Noon Tune Farm Show Noon TUB* «8V8 3:00 Week in Science 3:05 Sunday Serenade 3:30 News and Weather 3:35 Sunday Serenade 4:00 Public Affairs Program 4:30 News and Weather 4:35 Sunday Serenade 5: JO Kaleidoscope 5:30 News and Weather 5:40 Sunday Serenade 6:00 Triad Farm Show 6:10 Eventide Music 6:30 AM Sign Off 6:30 News and Weather 6:40 Eventide music 7:00 Triad Sports Round Dp 7:10 Eventide Music 7:30 News and Weather 7:35 Eventide Music 8:00 Kaleidoscope 8:10 Eventide Music 8:30 News and Weather 8:35 Eventide Music 9:00 Triad Religion Today B:10 Eventide Music 9:30 News and Weather 9:40 Evening Prayers 9:45 FM Sign Off 12:40 The Daily Record 12:45 Weather Roundup & Mktl. 12:50 Noon Tune Time 1:00 Garnett Hour 3:U() H'mmaklng Memos & Best Buys 2:05 KOFO Karavan 2:30 News and Weather 2:35 KOFO Karavan 3:00 Wonderful World Of Musle 3:05 KOFO Karavan 3:30 News & Weather 3:35 KOFO Karavan 4:00 Bulletin Board 4:05 KOFO Karavan 4:30 News and Weather 4:35 KOFO Karavan 5:00 Farm Market Analyst 5:05 KOFO Karavan 5:30 News and Weather 5:40 KOFO Karavan 6:OP Triad Business World 6:10 Eventide Music 6:30 News and Weather 0:30 AM Sign Off 6:40 Eventide Music 7:0>l Triad Sports Round Op 7:10 Eventide Music 7:30 News and Weather 7:35 Eventide Music 8:00 Triad World Report 8:10 Eventide Music 8:30 News and Weather 8:35 Eventide Music 9:00 Triad Time Out 9:11: Eventide Music 8:30 News and Weather 9:40 Evening Prayers 8:46 FM Blgn oU and give farmers and other interested people an opportunity to acquire skills seem to me part of our work," Anderson said. In some states vocational ag teachers are required to teach a certain number of adult classes outside of their regular scedule. There is no such regulation in Kansas, but this state encourages vocational agriculture classes in night school by giving financial support. Anderson has eight students enrolled in his welding class and 15 in the young farmers class. Each class period runs two hours. This year's enrollment is about the same as it has been in past years. The welding class is held on Monday night and the young fanners class on Wednesday night. Mrs. Shirley McCormick, Williamsburg, is the regular high school typing teacher and also the night class teacher. Out of the 18 students enrolled in typing only six have any knowledge of the subject. Two of (hem are self-taught, typists who enrolled in Mrs. McCormack's class find out how much they know and make up for what they couldn't teach themselves. The other four are in the class to get a more advanced knowledge. The other 12 students started in the class this year with nothing more than interest in learning to type. Most of the students are from Williamsburg and a few from Ottawa. The classes in all three courses run one semester and have been termed successful year after year. Library Notes "Notable Books" Available Here By NELL BARNABY Librarian The list of "Notable Books of 1962" was published late last week by the Notable Books Council of the American Library Association. The selections were made by 39 libraries from all sections of the United States, assisted by the 12 - member council. The Carnegie Free Library has the following titles from this list: Isaac Asimo, "Life and Energy." Rachel Carson, "S ilent Spring." NELL William Faulkner, "The Reiv- ers." Robert Frost, "In the Clearing." Richard Hughes, "The Fox in the Attic." Katherine Porter, "Ship of Fools." James Powers, "Morte d'Ur- ban." Barbara Tuchman, "The Guns of August." Andrew Turnbull, "Scott Fitzgerald." Elwyn White, "The Points of My Compass." Barbara Wood, "The Rich Nations and the Poor Nations." Discriminating readers may not agree with all the choices of this council, but will admit that there is a tremendous amount of excellent material here. NOTICE! JOE'S CAFE 112 North Main has been sold to Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Heckman, as of March 15, 1963. // Will Now Be Known as SADIE'S CAFE We have enjoyed your patronage and sincerely hope you will give SADIE'S CAFE the same loyal patronage we have enjoyed. To all our friends and customers who have been so good to us, we say "thank you." Joe & Sylvia Park; H. Jackson Station, grand junior deacon, St. John, E. Elmer Johnson, marshal, Shawnee. Wiley W. Morris, grand sword bearer, Kansas City; Woodrow W. Coleman, grand senior steward, Wichita; Howard Elliott, grand puruivant, Shawnee Mission; Carl A. Carlson, grand tyler, Topeka; and Lore V. Bader, assistant grand tyler, Le Roy. WATER HAULING GORDON PAUL CH 2-5425 24 Hour Service PROTECT YOUR CHILDREN THIS YEAR HALF A MILLION CHILDREN WILL SWALLOW POTENTIALLY POISONOUS SUBSTANCES-500 WILL DIE!! This unnecessary slaughter can be stopped if parents "poison-proof their home. > How many times can you say "Yes ... my home is poison-proof.", YES NO a Do you keep household products and medicines out of the sight' and reach of children? Even if you leave the room for an instant be sure the container is in a safe place. Do you store household products only in their original containers? Cups, glasses, and soft-drink bottles are for food and beverages^! NOT for bleach, kerosene, turpentine, etc. Do you store medicines separately from other household products? Are you sure that all your household products and medicines are properly labelled? Do you always call medicine by its proper name? Medicine is NOT candy. Do you clean out your medicine chest and storage cabinets regularly? Do you use caution when you throw away an old container? The contents should be flushed down the drain and the container rinsed. PROTECT YOUR FAMILY EVERY WEEK FROM THE DANGERS OF ACCIDENTAL POISONING, POISON PROOF YOUR HOME TODAY NATIONAL REVENTION WEEK MARCH 17-23, 1963 This public spirited message brought t o you by the following Ottawa Druggists and the Ottawa Herald. BRISCOE DRUG STORE 847 S. Main CH 2-4I33 MANN - BELL DRUG CO. 50! N. Main CH 2-3924 RANEY REXALL DRUG 304 S. Main CH 2-3092

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