The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas on April 28, 2001 · Page 6
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The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas · Page 6

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Salina, Kansas
Issue Date:
Saturday, April 28, 2001
Page:
Page 6
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JVB SATURDAY. APRIL 28, 2001 FAMILIES THE SALINA JOURNAL • CHILDREN'S BOOKS Norville shares experience TV show host's children's books grow out of lessons she teaches her children By SAMANTHA CRITCHELL The Associated Press NEW YORK — Deborah Norville, journalist, author and mother of three, is an accidental parenting expert. "I think we're all out there, always looking for solutions for our kids, comparing with each other all the time. I'm an extension of it because people see me juggling work and home, and they think I must have it all figured out." That's not exactly true, she says, but whatever insight she does have, she'll put out there. "I'm just another working mom, kind of a volunteer. I'm not selfish; I'll share something with ..,Nr,«.ii I e others when 1 do figure it NORVILLE out." And no question is too embarrassing or too personal. Want to know about her quarreling kids? She makes her children put a quarter in a bucket each time they get into a fight. What's Norville's favorite childhood hook? "The Cat in the Hat." What would she have done differently in her career? That's easy: She wouldn't have obeyed the gag order she was under while working at NBC's "Today" In 1997, she told the very public fiasco , of her short-lived stint as a co-host of the morning show in a book that was part biography, part self-help book. But when she hit the road to promote "Back on Track: How to Straighten Out Your Life When It Throws You A Curve," it seemed her book-signings turned into parenting lessons. Now she's put those on paper, too. "1 Can Fly!" is Norville's second children's book. It's a fictional pop-up book The Associated Press Deborah Norville's latest children's book, "I Can Fly," was written to encourage her son Kyle to pursue his artistic talents. that parents can read to their kids ~ or vice versa — about the hidden talents buried within us all. Children will absorb a lesson from the pages of a colorful storybook while they will ignore the same message when it comes in the form of a sermon from mom or dad, says Norville, 42. Norville and husband Karl Wellner have two sons, Niki and Kyle, 10 and 6 respectively, and a 3-year-old daughter, Mikaela. "My lectures were going right past them. They were tuning me out like changing channels on TV. But when kids 'discover' things themselves, they stick!" To test her theory, Norville wrote a silly poem about a bully when Niki was having trouble at school with a touglj kid. Niki saw his story in the poem even though Norville never mentioned him, the buUy or any of the specific details — and the message was planted. So when Niki started to have difficulty sleeping, she again turned to storytelling. Norville wrote "I Don't Want To Sleep Tonight," which tells of the differences in a child's dreams on the nights he watches television compared to the nights he reads books at bedtime. Once this lesson became a fictional story, Niki quickly accepted a "no-TV-on- weeknights" rule, a rule that has been extended to her other kids. (Yes, it is ironic that her children don't watch a lot of television considering she earns her living as the anchor of "Inside Edition," Norville admits.) Kyle was the inspiration for "1 Can Fly!," explains Norville, because he is artistically inclined, and she wanted to foster that talent. Praise for his paintings carries over as confidence in other aspects of his life, making him willing to try new things. "The harm is not in failing but in never flying," Norville says. But young Mikaela is sure the new book is about her. She thinks the blond girl on the cover is supposed to be her, although in real life she is still working on discovering her special talents. Norville is quick to identify her own talents. "My gift is sewing. It's what got me through the 'Today' show nonsense. When I was being criticized left and right, I said to myself, 'It's OK because I'm a seamstress.'... I also have the gift of gab," she says. Her departure from "Today" a decade ago was extremely difficult, Norville says, but now, with six years of "Inside Edition" under her belt and her successes as a wife and mother, she is coming into her own. "I feel strong and confident now. I'm a good mom and that counts." Coincidentally, Norville's successor on "Today," Katie Couric, also is a children's book author. Her back-to-school story "The Brand New Kid" was published last fall. BRIEFLY Ford to offer free chiid-iD kits DETROIT — Ford Motor Co. plans to offer parents free child- identificatidn kits as a handy resource in the unfortunate event their kids vanish as runaways or victims of abductions. Under the "Commitment to Kids" program to be launched May 25, children brought to participating dealers nationwide can be photographed and fingerprinted for an identification book parents keep. The kit also instructs parents to log the child's physical description, then repeat the process every six months to update information as the child matures. Ford unveiled the initiative at the New York International Auto Show, in partnership with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Based on FBI statistics, about 750,000 children — more than 2,000 a day — were reported missing in 2000, according to the center, a federally funded clearinghouse that helps locate missing or mistreated children. Most of the abductions are by parents, and most of the children are recovered. Being 'wired' goes beyond mere wires NEW YORK — Wires, and not even technology, necessarily makes a school "wired." FamilyPC magazine announced in its May issue the top 100 wired schools in the country In addition to the actual hardware and software, the magazine study considered teacher training, funds allotted to technical support, district-level support and improvements in home-school contacts as key criteria. According to FamilyPC's study which was conducted with Homeroom.com (a division of The Prmceton Review), 84 percent of American school classrooms are wired to the Internet. Examples of the top schools include Camelot Elementary School in Lewiston, Idaho, where every student has a Web page, older students publish an online newspaper and yearbook, and all students collaborate on creative writing and art projects. At Delano Optional School in Memphis, Tenn., students use video cameras, digital cameras and computers to create a daily news program that has been credited with motivating students to stay in school. Four women named 'outstanding mothers' NEW YORK ~ The National Mother's Day Council selected four women that it feels should have an especially wonderful Mother's Day this year. Children's rights activist Sharon Bush, actress Jane Seymour, figure skater Nancy Kerrigan and fashion-industry ex;- ecutive Karen Murray are 2001's "outstanding mothers." The Mother's Day Council is a not-for-profit organization that honors women of high accomplishment in their choseii fields who also exhibit enormous achievements as parents. From Wire Service Reports LllVl !i MKHBOR, STOEFARM ISTHERF STATI FARM INSURANCI Bary Martin, Agent 1023 Greeley Ave., Salina 110 N.Concord, Minneapolis stale Farm Insurance Companies»Home OHices: Bloomlngton, Illinois 785-825-0555 Assessment & Treatment for Anxiety ckmhc Central Kansas Mental Health Center Serving the people of Dickinson, Ellsworth, Lincoln, Ottawa & Saline Counties 809 Elmhurst • Salina 823-6322 1-800-794-8281 PHARMACY & OPTtCAL 1^*... We're Still Here!!! In the same location for 30 years! Specializing in Custom Prescription Compounding, Nebulizers & Respiratory Medication Medicare Provider • Medicaid • Commercial Insurance Locally Owned and Operated, Dan Daley, RJH 321 S. Broadw^ay • In the Ace Home Center Salina, KS 67401 • 785-825-0524 • 785-825-6540 (fax) BRING YOUR OWN PENCIL All furniture and carpeting is clearly marked with clearance sale tags, but if you bring your own pencil, you can make your own deals for the best prices of the year! NEW LOWER INTEREST RATES 9.8%* SIMPLE INTEREST FINANCING We do our own financing. Ifs easy to qualify! SEE STORE FOR FINANCE DETAILS. INSTANT CREDIT APPROVAL BY PHONE 6 MONTHS NO INTEREST / 90 DAYS SAME AS CASH FURNITURE / CARPETING / DRAPERIES FREE DELIVERY ANYWHERE IN KANSAS SAVE UP TO 1/2 OFF IN ALL "10" SHOWROOMS Mfflei^s of (Min 45 Minutes West of Lindsborg 1-800-748-8314 • Located Downtown Claflin, Kansas See us in the Fiest AreaWide Directory. 6 MonthsJ^olntereston any purchase'90 Days Same As Cash . •^. , . We do our own 9.8% simDie iriterest financinq • 12. 24, 36 month olans, it's easy to qualify! " showrooms of Kansas' largest furniture selection U A/

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