The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on September 26, 1949 · Page 2
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 2

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, September 26, 1949
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PAGE TWO BLYTHETILLE (ARK.) COUUBB HKWI TMI NATION TODAY— . Sugar Prices, Still Under OP A, Draw Fire of Bottling Firms And importers of Raw Product By Oild A. Martin • Associated Press r*rm Reporter (For Jamw Marlow) WASHINGTON, Sept. ». Wj—Wartime price controls have long been 4ftA, but one major commodity still is under government price leg- tUitiae. It U «i«ar. ., Jh* »t>**mm»nt does not have direct authority to set sugar prices, but it eta control them Indirectly through the sugar act of 1948. Tills »et dlnett the A«rlculture Department to set up quotas on marketings inrf Import*. By moving the quotas up iind down, the department is in MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 19« • podUoo to regulate prices. Bone legmenU of the sugar Industry h»v« been kicking -up quite a fUM over the way the department h*i been administering the sugar law. •. . .On one aide are domestic producer*: Quite naturally they want prices as high as possible. It was largely in their Vhalf that the sugar law wu passed. The legislation is designed to stabilize prices and sup- pile* of sugar at levels which will enable them to compete with lower- cost foreign producing areas. Import Policj Crltfcited On the other side are sugar consumers! They want low prices. Some industrial'users, particularly the soft drink industry, have ben complaining that prices are too high. The reason they are too high, say the bottlers, Is that Secretary of Agriculture Brannan Is not permitting enough sugar to be imported to meet domestic needs. Domestic producers do hot grow enough to fill the country '«'needs. Reflecting the same viewpoint, one sugar refinery threatened to close. down. It said It could not get enough raw sugar from Cuba to keep going. These complaints from users and trie refinery led Brannan to boost the overall 1949 marketing quota from 7,250,000 to 7,500,000 short tons oh'Sept. 13. Whether this increase will satisfy the Industry only time will tell. Government figures show that during the first eight months of the y«ar Americans used sugar at a College of Ozarks Grad Elected to Head Institution Pitching Horseshoes BX BILLT KOBE Fred A. Walker OLARKSVILLE, Ark., Sept. 36, CAP)—A one-time crack debater at) the.College of the Ozarks Is the new president of the Presbyterian school here. Dr. Pied A. Walker wa.s chosen unanimously by the board of trus- quota for the greater annual rate than Brannan's i tees Saturday to succeed Dr Wiley -.•.,_,_.. ,_...._ ,-. .... Lin Hurle, who resigned Sent 1 because of III health. Dr. Walker had been acting president in his capacity as vice presl- original marketing year. The boost In the quota is expected to halt a recent slight upturn In prices. • • Called "Cheapest" Food The department Is not convinced, however,, that sugar prices are too high. In fact. It believes they may be on* cent a pound too low in relation to • price guide set up «ln the sugar law. \ The department recently reported that sugar Is one of the lowest- priced commodities, if not actually ^the lowest. From the Civil War period to the present there has been an upward trend In almost all food prices. Sugar is a major; exception, the report; Mid:"In terms of -prewar level of «n foods/ th« price of sugar has declined from a level of around 13 cents a pound (wholesale) for the decade of the - IMOs to a low point of 3.65 (centaV In 1948," the dent. He worked his way through .school, was a member of the undefeated debate team and a student at Ozarlcs during the early years of Dr. Hurie's administration, Dr. Walker was graduated In 1036. In the Interim before he returned to the college in 194« he was a Presbyterian minister in Arizona and Texas, his native slate, and directed homes for children In Milwaukee, Wis., and Farmington, Mo. Dr. Walker probably will be inaugurated next year. ar prices would be more than double what they are. if they had advanced as much since 1935-'39 as have all other fnods. The department believes the fact that consumption hns jumped fron department said. • a n annual average' of 19 pounds per Current prices are only slightly person during the Civil War to more •bove last year's ^ • than 100 pounds proves that sugar According to the department, sug- is a cheap food. The other night at Ltndj 1 '?, I had trouble reading the small type <jti the menu. "Can you recommend a good eye doctor?" I asked Milton Berle who was sharing my table. "I know a pip," said the television comedian. "He'll tell you In a minute whether you're a man at vision—or whether the reports have been exaggerated." The next day I dropped In to see (he optician. "I don't knot*' If it meani anything," I said, "but of late the electric lights have been bothering my eyes." "You mean," said Berle's doctor, "that as far »s you're concerned, Mazda's iv the colrt, cold ground." "Looks as If Milton pays you off In jokes." 1 said, The optician adjusted the metal disk on his forehead, peered into my peepers and then put me through the read - the - last - line backwards routine. "All kidding aside," he said, "you have an unusual malady. The only people who get it are men and women. It's known as overstarln, and it's caused by Hying In the Twentieth Century." "My eyes gel bloodshot now and then," I said. "Don't hmod about It," said the doctor. "If your enemies don't i shoot until Iney see the whites of your eyes, you can count on a lonz life." "Very reassuring." I said, '"but Isn't It serious when the blood that's supposed to go to your head goes to your eyes?" "Not necessarily," said the optician, "and to prove my point let me tell you a story Oat Berle told me recently. ..." Not long ago, )",Uton met up with an old friend whose eyeballs looked like chunks of overripe watermelon. "Where'd you get the bloodshot ; eyes?" asked Berle. "It's a grim story." said his Went) ! "One night a while back I was standing at a bar. minding my own brandy, when, a girl breezed In. Besides having a catchy kisser and » chasey chassis, she looked like a heck of a nice fella, and so I In- vitert her to have a drink. "Well, it turned out th»t we had an awful lot In common—we both liked cocker snanlels, convertibles with the top down and ulzza pie with anchovies. So. when dinner time rolled around. I suggested we have H snack together, and by the time we hart finished our crepes snieltps, I was so taken with her that I invited her to see .'South Pacific.' And to show you how'much I thought of the girl, when she accented I went out antt found two tickets to 'South Pacific.' "After that. T saw Mer every nlsht. We would dine at '21.' dancr at, Kl Morocco, ant! when the town folded usually go for a drive on Lone Tsland. "One night on the way home. I noticed the girl'wasn't savin? much, and when we pulled no In front or her plare she snueezed my hand and Invited me In for a nip'''"ap When we got lo her «nni j f«if "he looked at me tenderly for a long time and then burst Into tears, askert:, __ " 'What's (he matter, darling?' 1 " 'What;.we're doing Is wrong,' she sobbed. 'I'm a married woman.' "It developed her husband was in England on business, and the first thing I knew I »a* In tears myself. ' 'Dearest, 1 I said, 'I may as well come clean. I'm married, too.' "Then we both broke down, and for a long time we Just held hands and cried out hearts out together. "And, >s you know, when you cry every night for six months, your eyes are a cinch to get bloodshot* tCopyrlglit. .194*, by Billy Rev*) 'Released by The Bell Syndicate, Inc.) A "glabrous" man la a bald one. . . . watch it vanish under Packard's famed "self-eon- trolling" Limousin* Ridel Until you've experienced the silent, gliding restfulness of this roomy Packard-you're just not up-to-date on fine car comforts! Packard callj it the "Limousine Ride" because many of its advancements were first developed for the magnificent Packard Limousine. But the first ami foremost secret of its jupen'ority (ies in Packard's costly "self-controlling" suspension system. "S«rf-«ntrolling" means it compensates automatically for changes in load «nd road. "Self-controlling" means it Delivered her* Ntw lower Packard prices begin at $2319.48* '•'''"' """ ""'"I 'axes, if an\, antl trhiti Men-alls l*t ihnu-n share), extra. Prieei I -may lary ilightly in aJjoiuiag area, I became of transportation charges. i combines relaxing smnolbness with firm, levcl-keeletl rnadabilily. "Self- controlling" means it won't develop "baby-buggy bounce" in its later years! ASK IKE MAN WHO OWNS ONI Packard Motor Sales Co., Inc. The U 8. population Increased per cent between 1W4 and 1*4*. NOTICE AH owner* of real property »tthln the following described territory In the City of Blythevllle, Arkansas: Al) that portion of the Southeast Quarter of Section 17, Township 1} North, Range 11 East, of Mississippi County, Arkansas, lying within the city limits of Blytheville, Arkansas which embraces the following described tots and blocks a* shown on the Second Reptat of J. P. Pride and Gateway Subdivisions, prepared In May IMS by Jerry Cohen, engineer, aurl Ben s. Shanks, County Surveyor, of record In Plat Boole 1, pax* 171, In the Circuit Court Clerk's office In Blytheville, Arkansu: Blocks A, B, O, D, E, f, O, H, I, J, M, N, O, P, Q and R; Irregular Lois HA, 37, 31, 42, 43 and SO; and those portions of Lots X. 27, 28, 15, 36, 47. 48 and 4» lying within the city Itai- 1U of Blythevllle, Arkansas are hereby notified that t petition has been filed with the City Clerk of Blytheville, Arkansas purporting to be signed by two-thirds in value of the owners of real property within the above described territory, which petition prays that a local Improvement district be formed embracing said territory for the purpose of building a sanitary sewer system to serve said portion of Bly- thevllle, Arkansas, with the necessary outfall sewer or disposal plant, and that the cost thereof be assessed and charged upon the above described real property. All owners of real property within said territory are. advised that said petition will b« heard at the meeting of the City Council to be held at the hour of 8:0 o'clock P.M. on the 18 day of October, 1940, and that at said meeting said City Council will determine whether those signing the same constitute two-thirds In value of such ov,'HPrs,of real property; and at said meeting all owners of real property within said territory who desire will be heard upon the question. W. I. Malin, City Clerk 217 W. Walnut Phon. 3524 DID YOU KNOW "We have now a national income greater than we dared hope for even as recently as 5 years ago. "We have the greatest backstop of liquid savings in our country's history." "Our standard of living is rising and our population is increasing." 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