The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California on September 5, 1944 · Page 16
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The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California · Page 16

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Tuesday, September 5, 1944 Cfeitortal $age of Cfte Pafeerstfieto Calif or nian ALFRED HABBELL IDITOI »NP FDBL1IBIB Entered In post offlc* »t Baker«tleld. California, a* m>com1 cl««s mall under th* net ot Congresn Marrh 3. 1ST9. MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PI5EPS Th* Associated Press Is exclusively entitled m the nar foi publira. lion of all news dispatches credited to it nr not ntherwise cleaned In this purer, and also the Inral news published tHerein. The Bakersfleld Oallfornlan Is also a client of the I'n.ted Press and receives Its complete wire frv.' e. REPRESENTATIVES West-Holiday t:n.. Inc. Js'eir Tork. Chicago, San Francis"-", i.n* Angri* 1 *, Seattle. Portland, Denvf •WASHINGTON. D. C... PIT.I-:.M' The Haskin Service. \VathlnBtnri. I 1 ' By carrier nr mall (In advance) In pnMnl mr"-!« one. two. three. per month. SSc: six months. J5.10: on» ><•*>, *'.' f">. Hy mail in pe . . postal zone* four to eight, tier month. $1 ON LABOR TABOR conlimu-d "on the joh" over Labor ,1 j Day. Because labor has kept on the job, •with few notable exceptions, the United Slates Navy now has 1 1,000 ships, or more than twice all the rest of the world's navies together. Because labor has worked for this war, this country has produced 11 ships daily during 194-4; one rifle every ,'52 seconds; one machincgun every I'M seconds; 148,000 tanks during the last two years; 1,200,000 army trucks in one year; 8H.OOO landing craft for the invasion of Franco; 185,000 airplanes since Pearl Harbor and in all a production of 23 per cent greater lor ibis year than for 1943. There have been strikes and walkouts but these have been in the minority. For California the Division of Labor Statistics and Law Enforcement reports that the time lost as a result of strikes in California during the first quarter of 1944 represented two one- hundredlhs of 1 per cent of all lime worked. The national figure is higher but still less than 1 per cent. The army of Hie home front has consisted of some 51,000,000 and this "army" has established the greatest production record in the history of the world. Oddly enough, too, it was reported this month that California has lost more men killed iu war manufacturing than on all combat fronts. The actions of labor have sometimes been reprehensible, but so have the actions of other organizations. The obvious thing to consider is that all munitions of war, battleships, tanks, guns and planes are all the result of labor which has worked long and hard in the war effort and if any condemnation is made it should be directed not against labor as a whole but against the reprehensible elements of labor. Looking back over labor's record for the year can lead to only one conclusion—that production records for all time have been broken. That surely is not a bad record, but one of which labor can very well be proud. COURSE OF WAR with guns cmplaced so thickly as to justify the simile. The new carrier, and where she has been assigned is unknown, carries approximately 3000 men and they are all trained, specialized fighters. Broken into many watertight compartments and bulkheads it is believed our latest carrier will be much more difficult to sink than some of her foregoing sisters of the sea and air. She carries heavy armor, has great speed and represents the latest lighting craft in the world and probably the most formidable. The new ship is even now slicing the seas in combat areas and as a veteran nucleus for her crew are men who have given brave and useful service with other carriers now forever out of operation at the bottom of the sea. The ship's complement say she is lucky, they like her—that she has been a good ship from the very time she was launched, not many days ago. Now she moves into her battle areas, another symbol of American sea might, first in the world. ERNIE PYLE SCHOOL AGAIN M ORE than half of Belgium, including Brussels, has been liberated by the Allies this week and before the Germans is the Siegfried line which may prove as silly in modern war as the Maginot line, the great illusion of the French military mind at the opening days of the war. Finland has bowed to what everyone has known for weeks as the inevitable and capitulated to Russia, while the Soviet forces in Rumania arc advancing along the Hungarian border to make a junction with Marshal Tito's Partisans in Yugoslavia. The Allied troops in southern France arc on a military tour herding the Nineteenth Army of the Germans up the Rhone valley. The current phase of the war in the west can be summed up in a phrase: Germany is retreating to Germany. On the east Germany is being compressed by the mass of the Soviets and may be able to salvage remnants of her troops from Rumania and Bulgaria. She will need them all to defend Hungary and Yugoslavia, if she can defend these areas. NAVAL ARCHITECTURE T ins week thousands of Kern county children are returning to school. For many of them it has been the end not of a vacation period but one of hard work. Despite plaints concerning juvenile delinquency, and such defections have increased with the war, most of the youngsters of this nation have proved themselves to be fundamentally sound. Hundreds of thousands of them are fighting this war. They will not be children when they return home. But for the boys and girls loo young for war there is a task ahead that is just as important and that is to return to school and do their best to be worthy of the efforts of their immediate seniors who arc fighting this war. A better educated world, or a world belter educated, would make the horrible destruction of war impossible. In a large measure the fact that wars exist may be attributed directly to the large numbers of uneducated persons in the world. HITLER'S SPEECH W HAT happened to Hitler's sensational speech? Was he loo deeply underground to reach the air waves or too embarrassed after his years of chest beating, saber clashing and drum pounding to say anything except "uncle"? Rumor is that Hitler is preparing to make an offer for a negotiated peace and, if this offer is turned down will use another weapon more formidable than the really terrible robot bombs. Hitler has probably had his last word, long since, however, and though he elects to use poison gas or heavier robot bombs, what he can say now is probably of little moment except for the historians of the future who compile his case history. MacARTHUR'S REPLY L UNCHING recently of a new 27,000-lon aircraft carrier of the Essex class emphasizes a trend in naval architecture. The battleship of the future, or for a limited future at any rate, seems to have become.a carrier. In time it is believed that land-based planes will fly and light any place in the world for strategic attacks, but in the meantime the carrier is the great striking force of the navy and the other ships arc largely ancillary—to protect and serve the carriers and prepare for land occupations by preliminary bombardment and, of course, in their routine convoy chores. But the great naval fighter today is the carrier, which is the sea hive for the fighter planes. The new carrier of the "Essex class" is merely described for security reasons as carrying more than 80 planes. She is a very fast ship and probably has the most murderous batteries of guns of any carrier ever launched. Our carriers were woefully under- gunned at the outbreak of the war. Now they bristle like massive rqetal hedgehogs G KM-HAL 1)01 (iLAS M.U:AHTU UK, ill a statement made this week, said he knew nothing of the report that Australian troops tighl- iug in (lie Middle Hast hud sold quantities of their arms in Syria and Palestine before their departure for home. This report may be true but it sounds more like a silly piece of enemy inspired propaganda. (leneral Mat-Arthur's statement is as follows "I know nothing with reference to these troops in the Middle East but I know everything with regard to their conduct since return to Australia and consequent reassignment to my command. "Any belief that these divisions arc lacking in discipline is entirely erroneous. They are magnificent soldiers, not only on the field of battle but in conduct and deportment in back areas. There are no finer disciplined or trained troops in the world." WAR PRESSURE S i cci;ss of our war in the Orient is effecting a notable change in Japanese attitude toward war prisoners and this is, indeed, very fortunate for the unfortunate men that are j held in military custody by the Japanese. ! It has been announced from Washington that arrangements have been completed for a Japanese ship to enter a Soviet port near Vladivostok and then load a cargo of 1500 tons of relief supplies for American and Allied prisoners of war as well as exilian ! internees. The arrangements have been made by our State Department. All costs are to be defrayed by our own government. Our State Department has also informed Japan, through international intermediary that this government is willing to reciprocate in distributing relief supplies for Japanese nationals and soldiers held by this country. Japan should have concurred more readily in these arrangements long ago, but it took our mounting success in the Pacific to convince them that the war tides are turning. IX KKANCE (By Wireless)—We left I'aris after a few days and went again with the armies in the Held. In I'aris we had slept In beds and walked on carpeted floors for the first time in three months. It WHS a beautiful experience, and yet for some perverse reason a great inner fueling of calm and relief came ovor us when we once again set up our cots in a tent, with apple trees for our draperies and only the ureen grass for a rug. Hank (.lorrell of the United Press was with me, and he said: "This is Ironic, that we should have to go back with the armies to get some peace." The gaiety and charm and big- citynr'ss of Paris somehow had got a little r.in our nerves after so much of thr- opposite. 1 guess it indicates that all of us have to make our return to normal life gradually and in small doses. Purls unquestionably is a lovely city. It seems to me to have been but little hurt by the war. You can still buy almost anything imaginable if you have money. Everybody is well-dressed. But prices are terrific, and already they have started zooming higher. Those (if vis who expect to be coming home before long have made shopping tours and stocked up with gifts. And with the exception of perfume, which is dirt cheap, we pay about three times what we would at home for the same thing. I'm sorry the restaurants couldn't open before we left. For although I'm not much of a gourmet I do value the fense of taste, and we've euten enough meals in private homes and small-town restaurants over here to realize that it's all true about the French culinary genius. They simply have a knack for making any old thing taste wonderful, just as the British have a knack for making everything taste horrible. The other night we were talking about the beautiful women of I'aris, as who doesn't? One fellow said the women here were the most beautiful in the world. But I said no, that wasn't true. You see women in America and in England who are just as beautiful as any in Paris. But it seems that here the percentage of good-looking women is higher than in other cduntries. And another fellow said no, that wasn't it. either. He thought the ration was approximately the same in America amid England and in France. But in Paris a bigger percentage have the gift of getting themselves up to look devastating. And 1 guess that is it. We thought there were a lot of people on the streets those first two days. But you should have seen Paris a few days later, when the whole populace began to come out. By mldafternoon it is almost impossible to drive in the streets because of the bicycles. They take up the entire street, as far as you can see. The sidewalks are packed. It is like Christmas shopping time at home. Within three days Paris was transformed frnm a city crackling and roaring with brief warfare into a city entirely at peace. Within three days Paris was open for business as usual, and its attitude toward the war reminded me of Cairo after its throat of danger had gone. As usual, those Americans most deserving of seeing Paris will lie the lust ones to see it, if they ever do. By that I mean the fighting soldiers. Only one infantry regiment and one reconnaissance outfit of Americans actually came into Paris, and they passed on through the city quickly and went on with their war. The first ones in the city to stay were such nonfighters as the psychological warfare and civil affairs people, public relations men and war correspondents. I heard more than one rear-echelon soldier say he felt a little ashamed to be getting all the grateful cheers and kisses for the liberation of Paris when the guys who broke the German army and opened the way for Paris to be free were still out there fighting without benefit of kisses or applause. But that is the way things are in this world. (By ERSK1NE JOHNSON)- 1-ichind the screen: Sugary mother roles, Jane Darwell confessed today with just a trace of ennui, are beginning to sour. e ".fust for once," she says, "I'd like to be a hell-cat . . . get a role where I wouldn't have to pretend to be such an angelic creature." .Jane .Darwell has grounds for complaint. She has been cast as a mother in almost all of her 300 pictures. Her brilliant portrayal of "Ma .load" in "The Grapes of Wrath" definitely marked her—if such distinction was necessary—as the ideal mother type. She's mothered practically every actor in the business, Including Hank Fonda, Ty Power, Don Ameche and Mickey Hooney. But it is one of filmclom's ironies that she has never had any children of her own. She does admit, however, to a .strongly ingrained "mother complex." Her current picture is typical. She plays the part of "Mom," head of a servicemen's canteen. The title, "Hello. Mom." "I suppose," she reflects with just the hint of a sigh, "that I shall continue to purr and like it." Fourteen years as a make-believe policeman have made Edward Gargan America's most law-abiding citizen. He has discovered that not all members of the police profession approve of the way he presents them on the screen. There have been complaints. Playing another policeman in the Danny Kaye comedy, "The Wonder Man," Gargan reports that he once inadvertently parked his car in a restricted zone. The cop recognized him as the actor who consistently does less than justice to the mental status of gendarmes. 'lT§e officer went over Gargan with a fine tooth comb. When the resulting ticket was finally computed he had been cited for mal-adjusted headlights, oversized windshield stickers, expired brake certificate, ownership certificate improperly dis- From tKe Files of The Californian TEN* YEARS AGO (The Californian, this date. 1934) Headlines: Absent Votes Reveal Champness, Day and Shomate Victors. Wiley Post, tried the wings of his "Winnie Mae" at higher than 40,000 feet today. After a 14,500-mile voyage to principal parts of China and Japan, Miss Beulah Blair returned home this week. She will resume teaching at Fremont School September 10. Sports headline: Papiano and Stre- lich Regale Mat Fans Here This Evening. Adolph Hitler, dictator of Germany declared today "The National Socialist Revolutiln is ended. It has fulfilled all its hopes." Zita, former empress of Austria, said today that the engagement of Princess Maria of Italy to her son, Archduke Otto, has been arranged. TWENTY YEARS AG.O (The Californian. this date, 1924) Bernarr MacFadden is starting a New York daily newspaper so, he says, "When my infant son, now 6 months old, grows up he will have a human interest newspaper to read." The millionaire walks 18 miles bareheaded and barefoot to work. Paul diatom, who was In Yokohama just after the earthquake, Is now In Shanghai. B. J. "Rocky" Miller was elected second vice-commander of Frank S. Reynolds Post No. 2(i, American Legion, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of tester Creasy. Main dish at a banquet served by Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Morel was the goodly portion of a five-point buck bagged by Mr. Morel when the hunting season opened on the Tehachapi range. Six county schools opened for a ID-months session this week. They are Fruitvale, Vaughn, Lerdo, Mo- javc, Rosamond and Wlldwood. played and half a dozen other minor infractions. "Brother," said the cop, grinning savagely into Citizen Gargan's teeth "do I get a kick out of pouring it onto you." From that time on Gargan figured he was a marked man. He went back to his automobile and a life of caution. Edward Gargan started his cop specialist career back in 1930. He was Mulligan in the Chicago com pany of "Strictly Dishonorable," a role for which he took a four-week course in club twirling from a po liceman friend in New York. Hollywood talent scouts saw bin in the show, brought him to Holly wood for a career as a make-believe policeman. He has doffed policeman's blue occasionally to play dumb wrestlers, bartenders, con ductors and subway guards. "I went into a restaurant one night," he reports, "and a waitress handed me the menu upside down. 'So what,' she said when I went to straighten it, 'You can't read anyway.' " The cold blonde who became a hot redhead is Hollywood's newest feminine star—but nobody knows it yet. Vivian Elaine is her name. We discovered her in this column a while back. She has been starred by Darryl Zanuck .in three movies, "Greenwich Village," "Something for the Boys" and "Nob Hill." But none of the pictures have yet been released. Vivian was under contract to 20th Century-Fox for a year and nothing happened. She's a former orchestra singer. Then she dyed her hair red and the studio found a new personality. She had been typed before tha as a "cold blonde' in such films as Laurel and Hardy's "Jitterbugs." AM the feminine star of "Nob Hill" the studio will ballyhoo her as "the hot redhead." She battles with Joan Bennett over the affections of George Raft. THIRTY YEARS AGO (The Californian. this date. 1914) Headlines: England, France, Russia Sign War Pact. German Death List Outnumbers All Others More Than 100,000. Mrs. Helen Richardson was hostess last night at a party in honor of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Jonte who have just returned from Wyoming, Kansas, Texas and Los Angeles. Ray Hosmer will open a local music store in one of the vacant storerooms in Grand hotel block. A great street parade will feature the Barnum and Bailey circus coming to Bakersfield Saturday. Executive committee of Farmers' Protective League met this morning to fight the eight-hour law. Fred Metcalf, state organizer, was present. Planning to spend Monday and tomorrow on a hunting trip to Glennville, Frank Reynolds, Edward Bimat, Lyle Withington and Will Gleason are leaving this afternoon. lews -(Bv PAUL. MALLON)•WASHINGTON. Sept. S.—The sensational, overwhelming (188 to 54) repudiation of all pressure advice by the House upon the postwar unemployment relief problem, drew scant public attention—naturally, in view of what is going on in Europe. Only lean, unsearching press reports recounted the rejection not only of the C. I. O. $35 a week idea, but of the Senate compromise and Baruch as well, and indeed, the whole whooped-up notion of the necessity of federal relief—and this in the face of an imminent election. The House action said flatly: state unemployment insuar AOIN "There is $6,000,000,000 in the state unemployment insurance funds, and this should be enough to care for the situation—if not. the next Congress can handle it in January." The feat was made possible because Democratic House Ways and Means Chairman Doughton was angry, very angry. He was angry first at the Senate because it had passed the George Bill, whereas all taxation legislation should be conceived by his committee. He could hardly see anything good in the Senate bill, and his attitude permeated the whole house with a desire to put the Senate in its place. This was all done by teller votes (individually anonymous) so the action cannot be held against any individual congressman in the election; also congressmen may change their minds without individual identification when the compromise between the Doughton and George bills finally conies from the present conference of the two houses. But with these reservations, the House Democratic leadership turned its back on its vice-presidential candidate, Senator Truman, who promoted the Committee for Industrial Organization $35 a week bill (it had no word from Mr. Roosevelt who persistently and coyly remained out of the argument despite C. I. O. efforts to get him to speak). These congressmen are mostly from small towns, the vastly sprinkled middle class communities of the country. The portion of their northern and Pacific city brethren, who opposed them, number no more than 54 on any vote, which shows why C. I. O. will never be popular politically in this country, or its associated communism. The C. I. O.'ers are really only a minority in their own labor union minority. The C. I. O., of course, failed everywhere with its proposition, in the Senate as well as the House, because everyone could see it was just a plain greedy grab. There was never Tike Readers' Viewpoint EIHTOlt's NOTE—Letten should be limited to 150 worth; mi; attack Idea* but not persons; must not be abuslte ind should be written Iftrtbl.v and on one aide of the paper. 1'he I'allfornlin is not responsible toi the. sentimenU ronutnetl Ibneln and raenei the right to reject an> letters. U'lteis must bear an authentic addrat and algnature, although theae will be withheld If desired. OX JAPANESE Editor ThcvCaliforniu: 1 wish to call your attention to the following article in the August 21 issue of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin that recently reached this forward base: "PORTLAND, Ore., Aug. 21. UP)— Grange masters representing 125,000 members in five western states today usked the federal government to prohibit persons of Japanese extraction from returning to the west coast after the war." As a loyal Californian, I have always been proud of the degree to which our state is free of racial and national discrimination and yet our State Grange leaders were listed as supporting this scheme. For that and other reasons I am thoroughly disgusted with the forces that advocate this un-American outrage. 1 luive a friend of Japanese ancestry, and 1 say it with pride, from the Pacific coast that I would like to toll about, and 1 challenge tho grange masters to tlcny this American the right to return home. "A prisoner was taken during the mopping up on this island. My friend was our interpreter. He learned from this prisoner where a number of others were hiding, as we approached the spot, it was a covered slit trench with a sinall opening at each end. After failing to induce thosi inside to come out our interpreter drew a trench knife neatly decorated w'th brass knuckles and crawled through one entrance to the trench. The enemy immedi- diately started i.oplng out of the other entrance with no desire to fight. From these prisoners our interpreter learned of more—but I think what I've told la sufficient. Just take in from this G. I. that our interpreters have plenty of nerve and their services are invaluable.' 4 As yet I don't think the people on the home front in this war have started slaughtering Dachshunds and a man isn't a traitor If he calls sauerkraut what it is instead of "liberty cabbage," so let's not permit a headstrong group to undermine the very basic principles of our American democracy by such rank discrimination against loyal Americans of Japanese ancestry. Sincerely, CORPORAL GLENN w. MCDONALD. Somewhere in the Marshalls. August 28, 1944. LEGISLATIVE MACHINERY Editor The Californian: Apparently there is something haywire with the machinery of our government, especially with regard to the United States Senate. Nevada with a population of 70,000 has two senators. California with one hundred times as great a population (seven million) has two senators. Nevada has two vigorous men on the job attending to business, while our senior senator is old. And our junior senator attends only about half the sessions, thus giving Nevada a decided advantage over California In voting strength, and influencing legislation. We are paying an artificial price for gold and silver, and since Nevada produces silver, and California gold, a mere handful of people might reduce the price of gold and retain the present high price of silver. The old style Senate was a Fascist instrument established and maintained to make possible the government of the minority. Fortunately there is some Improvement, and California may add to that Improvement by electing our lieutenant-governor, Frederick Houser in November. J. W. HICKS. A THOUGHT FOR TODAY The /ooJ hath said <>i his heart, There is no God, — Psalms 14:1. * • * There is indeed a God that hears and gees whate'er we do.—Plaitu*. \.^s FORTY YEARS AGO (The Californian, this dale. 1904) Captain Lucien Baer, grand marshal of the day, was in command when a parade celebrated Labor Day. Edna Pelham held a position of honor as goddess of labor in the float leading the procession. Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Baer celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary in San Francisco Sunday. Hiram Lake, homesteader in the Fish Lake region, was brought to Bakersfield with a badly lacerated leg after spending t\vo days in a bear trap. A private meeting of independent oil producers will be held tonight. Eddie Brite, 12-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. James Brite, accidentally shot himself through the foot yesterday while trying to kill a gopher with a .22-caliber rifle. Local visitors to the state fair report that the fair project is a decaying institution. They say that harness racing was tiresome and interest in general insufficient to attract attention. FIFTY YEARS AGO (The California!!, (his date. 1S94) Miss Ida Deacon has returned from San Francisco after a busy time selecting the latest millinery. In Dinuba, grape pickers are paid 2',» cents a tray and board. Quite a number of Indians are at work there. G. S. May, young farmer on Union avenue, planted a single grain of Russian barley last spring and from it raised 72 heads. Frank Stewart has resigned as cashier of Producers Savings Bank and Frank Robinson has been appointed in hia place. Considerable lumber is being brought to town from the White River Mills to the new yard on the corner of Chester and Twentieth street. Richard Dreese was elected president of Citizens' League last night. Henry Farscow rigged up a light boat this summer, launching it in Kings river to float down to the sloughs north of Tulare lake. SO THEY SAY If this country should fail to maintain its domestic economy at a high level of activity, to pursue a foreign economic policy consistent with its economic position in the world, and to take the leadership in world economic co-operation, the frustrations of the thirties will undoubtedly be repeated.—Howard P. ^yhidden, Jr., foreign policy association research associate. We must have the united support of the whole American people so that the arrangements that, are made for the peace and to keep the peace will be supported year in and year out by our people, regardless of the administration in power.—-Thomas E. Dewey. Paris is a precious symbol of that civilization which it was the aim of Hitler and his armed hordes to destroy. We rejoice with the gallant French people at the liberation of their capital.—President Roosevelt. PEN SHAFTS If we have an international police force to keep the peace, that will at least solve the unemployment problem for the Irish. The man who coined the expres sion "dirt cheap" should have lived so long as to talk to a real estate operator now. With more women in politics than ever you'd be surprised at some of the hats tossed into the ring. America, England, Russia, China— we're hoping that quartette can pro duce world harmony. Now that the girls are driving taxis shouldn't we revise that old saw and death and taxes? a better simile for Its failure than that of the dog that'saw a bone as large as he in the water, but upon his own submersion in a leap for it, found It was only his shadow. For instance, Montana's democratic Senator Murray originally had joined in with Senator George in this " conversion matter, proposing a maximum $25 a week unemployment allowance for the highly paid war workers. They could have got that < then. But organized labor began an attack on Murray, although he had always been a strong labor' man. (Incidentally, A. F. L. backed the C. I. O. in this matter, even though not conspicuously.) The peculiar newspaper, PM, sharply denounced Murray. »So he turned around and joined in the Murray-KHgore bill, setting up the unemployment rate to $35. This shocked both the country and Congress, because it was $10 a week more than would be allowed soldiers. In various other bills the C. I. O. Congressmen tried to get away from their original mistake and give the veterans the same or a little more • than their own war workers, but no one can remember anything but that $35 original proposal, which might have established that figure as a na- ti-nal minimum wage, because few workers who could remain idle two years for that amount, would care to work for less. (The workers will now get about $18 a week maximum average in the state unemployment insurance laws for much less than two years.) . Even the war workers themselves laughed at the C. I. O. proposition. For so-.ne years they generally have been making more money than ever in their lives, and they could not » possibly spend it all, because of rationing and the shortage of goods. Also they have been buying bonds which now may be cashed at any bank. Yet even the George bill passed by the Senate proposes to give them up to $200 each for railroad fare back home in addition to their state compensation of $6,000,000,000 as needed. The House no doubt will weaken in conference with the Senate, even though the size of the federal war debt makes unneeded relief seem a dangerous undertaking. Politics will probably require it. But even this brief respite furnished a remarkable reversal of the usual story from Washington. (World ooDjrliht, 1944, b? King Feature! Em- dlcite, Inc. AU right* reserved. Reproduction ID full or I.) litrt strictly prohibited.) a skin git on Colmimn -(By PETER EDSON)From various sharply angled civilian conjectures about the returning servicemen, one would be tempted to believe that the country will be overrun after the war with a collection of kill-crazy characters who would bash in a mother-in-law's head at the slightest provocation. The returned serviceman is pictured as a moody, jittery, embittered coarsened man, unable to adjust himself to the humdrum of making a living. If lie has been long away in foreign lands, he is sometimes seen by worried wives as a fancy philander who never will be able to sink into housebroken domesticity. The gloomy forecast will be realized. There will be men who, calloused by killing, will reach for a gun reflexively. There will be alcoholics, shattered-nerve cases, loafers, bums, drifters, thieves, ne'er-do- wells. There will be men who never again will be able to settle into monogamous domesticity. Lads who never said "darn" will Interlard their talk with rugged Anglo-Saxonisms, and mild kids who never tussled In school will knock the ears off the first guy to rile them. But these men will be a minority group, possibly no larger than a similar group under peacetime conditions. One naval transport officer who has been bringing men back from overseas for some time now has had a liberal chance to observe their reactions. He says no man is quite the same when he conies back. There is the usual quota of disciplinary cases, mental cases, combat fatigue cases. Some men are greatly embittered. But by and large, the guy you sent out is going to be pretty much the same boy you remember, after he's had a chance to adjust himself. American youngsters, according to this officer, have a great talent for regarding even their most fantastic experience as a rather bizarre dream. It does not stick with them. . "I have talked to kids just after they'd finished killing Japs," the officer said, "and they were totally unable to attach any significance to it. It was something apart from reality—some peculiar game they were playing. Reality, for them, was baseball and hot dogs and football games and pretty girls. "Dirt and lice and blood and Japs yelling 'American, you die!' was a sort of strange interlude ... a period to be sweated out until that nebulous day when everybody could get up and go home. "No matter what the refrigerator and motor company advertisements say Americans are fighting for— everything from blueberry pie to the right to root for the Brooklyn Dodgers—that's a lot of hooey. American kids are fighting because they were pulled into or jumped into the army, taught discipline, and are are obeying it by killing other people. "They are fighting because (1) they don't want to die, (2) they ar« hopped up with battle hysteria, (3) they don't like it where they are and want to get the h— out of there and go home as quickly as pissible. They do not spend all their time reviling Hitler and Hirohito, declaiming democracy, and pitying themselves as a potential lost generation. They cussed John L. Lewis a lot louder than they ever cursed Hitler. "A strange thing happens to * returned veteran when he first hits the American beach. For a while he is nervous,, feels uncouth, hampered and strange. He will rage at restrictions and inconveniences, fume at civilians, and for a little while he will feel like a hero. "He will curse louder and dirtier, and chances are he will drink more heavily and get drunk more raucously. Maybe he will brag some, and he will undoubtedly embroider his experiences. "But one morning he -wakes up, and feels as if he never went away. He is bored from telling of his experiences, tired of being feted, a little sick of whisky and hlgh-lifing. All he wants to do is settle down to the kind of job he had before. 'Guadalcanal or Salerno or Tarawa become dim, almost nonexistent in hia mind. He finds It hard to believe that he, ex-Private John Smith, has ever been away from South Dakota. Japs are something played by Chinese actors In war films, and all GeVmans are Erich von Stroheim once more. He la bored with the whole business." mesiions A nswers Q. What were some of the slogans used in the last three presidential campaigns?—R. E. C. A. In 1932 the Republicans used the slogan "Whoop it Up for Hoover", the Democrats, "New Deal" and "Forgotten Alan." During the 1936 campaign the most popular slogans of the Democrats were "New Deal," "Roosevelt or Ruin." "Hoover promised this automobile to me, Roosevelt gave it to me, Landon is trying to take it away." The Republicans used the slogan "Raw deal." "Vote for Landon and land a Job," "Stop this retreat," and "Three long years." In 1940 the Republicans used the slogan "Win with Willkie." Q. What is the significance of the letters O. N. T. on spools of thread? N. W. R. A. After the invention of the sewing machine a special thread was necessary for its use. George A. Clark made a 6-cord thread which was softer than the thread used previously for hand sewing. He called it "Our New Thread.' The name was shortened to O. N. T. Q. What ie the salary of the vice- president of the United States?— W. B. R. A. The vice-president, who is also the presiding officer of the Senate, receices $15,000 a year. Q. la there a constellation called the Northern Cross? T. H. B. A. The constellation Cygnus, the Swan, is sometimes called the Northern CroM. It is much larger than the famous Southern Cross. Q. When did Governor Dewey and Herbert Brownell, Jr., first become friends?—C. M. A. Current Biography says that, "Brownell's entry into politics was made as an election district captain in the old Tenth Manhattan Assembly District. Working in the same district was another electloh captain, Thomas Dewey, and the two young political workers became good friends." Q. Please list the names of the members of the 1914 regular lineup of the Philadelphia Club which contained Connie Mack's famous $100,000 infield.—C. H. G. A. Mclnnls, first base; Collins, second base; Baker, third base; Barry, shortstop; Wally Schang, catcher; Strunk, Oldring and Murphy, outfielders; 'Plank, Bender. Bush, Breasler, Pennock, Shawkey and Wlchoff, pitchers. Q. What is the origin of the saying, "one picture tells a thousand words"?—D. J. M. A. It is an ancient Chinese proverb, "Hua-l neng ta ch'ien yen" which literally translated means, "Picture's meaning can express a thousand words." Q. Why is it unwise to crack nuts with the teeth?—A. E. R, A. This is a bad practice becausn it may break the enamel and start decay. A nadw MB lit tb< answer to ua quattioa of fact ta •titlni Tto B*ktnH*U| CiUtontaB InforauUiM Bureau. 11* En Btrwt, N. X.. WuhiBfbia, «. O. 0. riMM aaokM t«iM (Hi ea*U for nvlj. ,*

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