The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California on September 5, 1944 · Page 7
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The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California · Page 7

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Bakersfield, California
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Tuesday, September 5, 1944
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Page 7
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AROUND THE GARDEN Wilh ALV1N PERKINS • As long as any of us can remem- biy-, there have bpen 6 vegetables which are essential to every garden. They are radishes, carrots, beets, turnips and cabbage. Of all these vegetables, only two are popularly used; carrots and beets. Usually not cabbage because of reasons I shall list later on. There Is no vegetable that grows more abundantly than the lowly radish. The word radish. denotes many things, but mostly a ruddy, rooty vegetable which has grown rank, crtfcked and pithy. Actually there Is no reason for this If proper cultivation rules are observed as well as the selection of the proper type of seed. Radishes can be grown the year- round in California. A sandy lourn is best, but radishes can be grown in almost any soil. Keeds should be planted in holes 1 to 2 Inches apart. If this Dimple rule is observed, there will be no waste due to thinning. Crimson Giant Is without a doubt one of the finest varieties for Bak- ersfleld. The roots are large and globular, and very often atttaln the pize of one and one-half inches in diameter. This particular type of ra,dish is known for its non-pithy quality. It attains a fine size and shape as well as good color which the name denotes. Another which does well and is ot sound root is the French Breakfast radish. Being of medium size and olive shaped it is tender and crisp. A good white variety IB Long 'White Icicle. Considered the best of the early whites, it is popular in home and truck gardens. The roots are long taporod, and are crisp with a mild tangy flavor. Carrots Next in line is the old standby for '• ev*ry garden—carrots. Most of us have no difficulty in growing this root, but as in everything, there are Rome varieties more suited to our I stood in a large seed store one day and watched people pick out seeds. Some carefully looked at 5 or 30 different packets, carefully read- Ing each label, planting directions and maturity data. I am sorry to report that few did this, for in our fast and scurrisome life we "grab- and-run." Oh, yes, you'll have carrots. I know of someone who had carrots with long orange roots and fairly good green tops. They looked Mke good specimens, but when cooked were utterly tasteless. Why you ask. There are many reasons, but mostly they stem from the kind of seed planted. Various «eeds are suited to certain soils. For instance, if your soil is heavy, the fat little flame-colored oxheart is what you should plant. It matures in the neighborhood of 70 days, and produces good sound roots when young. Again, you may have a good soil in which almost any carrot or other vegetable will grow. In that case yould should start looking for an old standby which has been popular for many years. The test of a good vegetable is whether it is received well on the commercial market. The seed company will give you this information by way of catalog or seed packet. You can take the word of a well-known seed company for the popularity, soundness or growing habits ot any plants with very few reservations. There is one thing which must be considered always. That is, that the purchaser must remember that the seed company plants and grows its seed under as nearly perfect soil conditions aafcare possible. Therefore, with the help of nearly the best climate conditions, they obtain the best growth, size and color possible. Then, from this they write the copy for their seed catalogs and seed packets. It is a wise gardener who Is pessimistic as to packets of carrot need whose copy claims to contain seed capable of attaining a root of 10 to 12 inches. It is possible, of course, but the average gardener is not so fortunte. It Is. however, a good plan to take their word as to popularity value. A vegetable or flower seed which has a good market record, Is sure to give you satisfaction. Beets Beets have long been a problem liocause of their lack of attaining the usual market size. Some are lucky enough to grow large roots to begin with, but I've known many gardeners who have given up in despair because they produced puny, knotted roots. Beets of all types are best when harvested young. That Is, one to two inches in diameter. Beets, like most vegetables, like a sandy loam, but can be grown in almost any kind of soil with proper irrigation, cultivation and fertilization. One ounce of seed plants 100 feet of beets. Reeds should be planted one inch deep and 2 to 4 inches apart Because of the size of the beet seed, they are by far the easiest vegetable to plant. Early Blood Turnips, Earl Flat Egyptian, and Early Wonder are three good varieties for table use. Early Blood Is crisp and tender with good color. Plat Egyptian has flattened roots, with a long thin tap root. Because some people grow beets for their edible, tops, it might be well to remember that Plat Egyptian ran be used for both top and root. Early Wonder is good for this, too. Cabbage Por persons wishing to plant cabbage now, I would suggest either a seed bed or a flat. Sow the seed in a well-drained bed. Plant '<& inch deep, tamping the earth gently over the seed. Transplant In rows 3 feet apart when the seedlings are 2 inches high. 3eed planted now will yield cabbage for spring use. Keep the young plants well watered and cultivated. It must be remembered that cabbage is best grown in the east in midwinter. Therefore, our time of planting is out of regular season. Varying weather conditions often cause cabbage plants to become stunted and seedy. Aggeler and Musser Golden Acre seed is good for obtaining cabbage of sound head. The plants are small with heads 5 to 6 inches in diameter. This cabbage is good for family use. Red Dutch, a good slaw cabbage, as well as Danish Cannon Ball, is good for local planting. Cabbage from seed should only be attempted by the gardener with time to spare. For the busy person of today whose gardening is something secondary, I suggest waiting for plants in the early part of 1945 and obtaining them direct from your nurseryman. Turnips Turnips are far tastier for either salad or cooking purposes when cultivated often during growth, and harvested when only 1 to 2 inches in diameter. Often the gardener will let the root grow until it is large and pithy. A light enriched soil is best for tunips. Sow in rows 10 to 12 inches apart and then to 3 to 4 inches in the row. 'Golden Ball is excellent for many uses. It matures in 50 to 60 days, and is a good turnip for table use because of its fine golden grain flesh. The roots are medium and globu- DANGER AHEAD IF TEETH NEGLECTED Use Accepted Credit for timely dental repairs. Pay later, by the week or month. DR. PAINLESS PARKER SAYS: REASONABLE PRICES FOR ALL . DENTAL SERVICE YOU REQUIRE * Make your first visit * without an appointment, start work immediately and pay when convenient in weekly or monthly amounts. Make your own credit terms, within reason. You pay the same with credit or cash. No carrying charges for dental plates, extractions, fillings, crowns, bridgework and inlays. , BUY MORE WAR BONDS AND STAMPS FOR TOTAL VICTORY "Because millions of Americans fail to take advantage of the facilities of modern dentistry, the toll in disability and ill-health has reached staggering proportions in civilian life." Trinslueint Tilth for Dintal Plata Offir Natural Effiets Science has perfected artificial teeth that simulate the appearance of human ones. They absorb and reflect light as do your present teeth, and are available in the shape and size of natural teeth. They are difficult to detect. DENTAL PLATES Pay while you wear them. . . . No interest charges with ACCEPTED CREDIT Pay as You Are Paid CREDIT DENTISTRY Prices quoted in advance DR. PAINLESS PARKER DENTIST •ak«r*fi«ld Offices—Telephone Bakorsfleld 2-1MO Twentieth and Chester Avenue Others in Fresno, Los Angeles, Stockton and in All Leading Pacific Coast Cities lar-smooth and yellow orange. The tops, which have much nutritional value, are tender when harvested from this variety. The small golden balls can be used either for cooking or salads, while Early White Dutch should be confined for cooking purposes only. Remember again, that if you will observe the following simple six word rule, you will be doing yourself a favor as well as the seed companies. "Plant only what you can use." This rule helps you as well as everyone else. If you will not try to run an experimental propagating grounds In a 12x12 vegetable garden, you will have yourself many hours of cultivating, weeding and watering. In observing this you help the seed companies for they are working twice as hard to keep up production for the thousands of new Victory Gardens. In buying only the seed you need and can take care of, you are leaving seed for the next gardener. Your nurseryman will also appreciate this. KDITOIl'S NOTE—Persona wlnhlnsr Harden question! answered are welcome to write to J. Alvln Perklnn at 308 Adams street, Bakersfir>)d. Pleane enclose a •tamped, self-addressed envelope. "Plushy Life" Set for Returned Vets Santa Barbara, Miromar, Mormonte Hotels Taken Over SANTA BARBARA, Sept. 5. UB— The cream 'of hotel service . . . sports . . . motion pictures . . . and just plain loafing in the sun—that's the plushy life in store for overseas veterans moving today into resort hotels here under the new reorienta- lion and redistribution program for army ground and service forces. The fighting front veterans may bring their wives along if they wish. They're taking over the Santa Barbara, Mlramar and Marmonte hotels, which comprise one of five AGF-ASP redistribution centers now being opened in the United States. The new army plan for these branches of the service is similar to a redistribution program operated for some time for army air forces personnel at Atlantic City, N. J., Miami Beach, Pla., and Santa Monica. Returning personnel first go on a 21-day furlough and then report to the redistribution station nearest their homes. They spend from 7 to 14 days getting complete physical examinations, having their military records completed and recuperating. But much of the time is devoted to play and relaxation. FRATERNAL Caledonia Ix>«]ge Caledonia Lodge No. 486, F. & A. M., will hold its stated meeting for the month of September Wednesday at 7:30 p. m. in the Caledonia Masonic temple. Important business will be transacted and all members are requested to attend. Refreshments will be served following the meeting. C. A. Simmons, worshipful master, will preside. Star of the Valley Lodge Star of the Valley Lodge No. 270 will hold its first fall meeting Tuesday at 1:30 p. m. at the Masonic temple. Small children will be cared for at the temple during the meeting. Pentalpha Club Pentalpha Club of Security Chapter, O. E. S., will meet for a potluck luncheon at 12:30 p. m. Tuesday, September 5, at Beale Park. Members are urgently asked to attend. Lackawanns Council Lackawanna Council No. 154, Degree of Pocahontas, will hold a business meeting Tuesday at« Druids hall. Delegates at the recent convention will give reports and plans for fall activities of the council will be made. Young Amick Slightly Improved, Hospital Says Six-year-old Robert Amick, son of Mrs. Jewell Amick, 1293% Ogden avenue, who was hurt in an automobile accident Sunday, is reported "a little improved" today by Kern General Hospital nurses. Condition of Wilford Lamarr, 45, 2307 Burger street, who fell from a power pole Sunday, is "fair," according to Mercy Hospital officials. Businm and Professional GUIDE Phini 7.TSII for Monthly RitM ACCOUNTANTS JOHN W. CULLITON PUBLIC ACCIUNTANT Income Ta* Service. Audit* 8?<temi SOa-tOH ProfrMlonal Building Phone 9-9S91 CHINESE HERBS T. LIM HERB SHKOIAI.I8T STIMACH TROUBLE SPECIALISTS Remedies for All Ailment* FRRV CONSULTATION Farmer Her'i Imlractor Canton Colleie. Canton China Twentr-fanrth and K Street! Phone 5-5051 LAUNDRIES LAUNDRY SERVICE Laundry Scrrlce Unexcelled—That If Dor Motto—Ten Different Service* and Zorio Dry Cleanlnt CITIZENS LAUNDRY •Ixteenta «n<t O Street* Pbana S-S401 LET "Things Worth While" Brighten Your Life KPMC at 3:30 P. M. LET IVERS FURNITURE COMPANY Brighten Your Home Tfca Have •( Quality. Style a«d Braaty la Farnlture 625 Nineteenth Street Phone 4-4711 tEhc Hahtrgfielo Californian Tuesday, September 5, 1944 7 WAR HITS SOCIETY PLAYGROUND—The fabulous Riviera, once guy playground of society, made front page headlines with American invasion of southern France. Photo shows a view of Cannes, noted resort, fashionable resort. Polish Cabinet Meets to Discuss Warsaw LONDON, Sept. 5. <&) —Poland's exiled governnif;nt. sluiUIng in a new crisis pn-fipil;i|i'd by funeral Kazi- mu'iv. Siisnknwski .s denunciation of Allied failure tu relieve Warsaw, called a special cabinet meeting today. Premier Stanlslaw Mlkolajczyk conferred with British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden just before the ministers met. A spokesman said the mooting was concerned primarily with the plight of Warsaw. It wi>s expected, however, that the cabinet would consider advancing the date for the proposed reorganization of Poland's military direction and replacing General SiiHiikuwskl. the Polish commander in chief, with a civilian board. The general is in disfavor in .Soviet Russia. IWMHS HIT KNfiLAM) LONDON, Sept. ii. C.P) --Britain's four-day respite, from flying Immh attacks ended abruptly today when the (Jermaus sent another shower of robots over London and southern England shortly before day break Both casualties and damage resulted. Warplanes Pound at Rhineland Bastions LONDON, .Sept. 5. (U.R)—More than l.Tii) American warplanes swept ahead of (he Germany-bound Allied armies today and hammered Karlsruhe, S'tmtniirt. and Ludwlgshafen. great. Rhlnr-land bastions anchoring the first line of defense of the Reich proper. Upwards of 75>» Flying Fortresses and Lihf>rntors wore escorted by some Son Mustangs of the Eighth Air Force fighter command In the three-prr.nge'! assault on the Rhine land area bordering the northeastern tip of Franre. Improving weather enabled /illiod air forces to resunin action on a major prale. Coital observer? reported interi'--o urilvlty thi.i afternoon, with all t n> - of pianos shuttling to and from F. in>pe JAI'S XKKI1 OH, By A fcin.^ ia • fd Pi*»su A Tokyo broadc ast s i id tud-iv that Japan's munitions mmistrv had effected two larce "caii; mei gors of the country's synthetic oil producer* to meet "a crying need for urgent action regarding the production of synthetic oil." Superb Values on Living Room Suites Regular $189.50 two-piece Hvingrooru suite of sturdy constructiou and durable woven tapestry cover, now reduced to only Regular $189.50 suite, including large comfortable sofa and matching club chair of handsome colonial design and attractive heavy tapestry 4.14(1 BA cover. Spring construction. Clearance price only Qi"™ i 'HI Regular $194.50 Lawson livingroom suite of charm and distinction. Well built and extremely comfortable, covered in enduring rose * I | A Ef| fabric. Priced now,at only.; 9* • "• Wl .Regular $209.50 two-piece livingroom suite of attractive design, exceptional comfort and charming appearance, upholstered in a good i>i||n CJ| durable frieze mohair. Now priced to sell at only plWwiWf THESE ARE ONLY A FEW OF MANY SUCH VALUES . . . Comfortable Platform Rocker SAVINGS Itognlar $(50.50 platform roi'kcr of unusual comfort, nicely styled CAQ Itfl and finished, covered in smart woven cover. Clearance price only....V**«» 1 WU Kogular $59.50 platform rocker of large, roomy size and attractive styling. Extremely comfortable and covered in handsome mohair cover. ttjIO ISA A rare value at only V*»w«*AI Ttr'gular $52.50 platform rocker, one of our better numbers that, is built to fit the contour of your body, giving it the last word in comfortable relaxation. A real bargain VALl'K nt only MANY OTHERS FROM WHICH TO CHOOSE . . . FURNITURE STORES Eighteenth and H Streets—Phone 8-8541 •AKERSFIELD 1028 Baker Street—Phone 4-4981 EAST BAKERSFIELD 519-521 Center Street TAFT -Phone 96 OPEN YOUR ACCOUNT WITHOUT RED TAPE KPMC at 7.15 A. M. KERN at 7:00 A. M. McMAHAN'S RADIO PROGRAMS KPMC at 12:00 Noon KPMC at 9:30 P. M. k V KERN at «:00 P. M. KERN at 12:48 P. M. I i

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