The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas on April 25, 2001 · Page 15
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The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas · Page 15

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Salina, Kansas
Issue Date:
Wednesday, April 25, 2001
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Page 15
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WISDNESDAY APRIL 25, 20CJ1 THE SALirfe '^OURNAL CLASSIFIED / C2 ALMANAC / C8 ars By JOYCE ROSENCRANS Scripps Howard News Service This is paragus. It's practically a rite of spring for cooks who love fresh asparagus. So start the water boiling. Asparagus is one of those vegetables that ranks high in vitamins C and A, iron and fiber. It's as virtuous a vegetable as, say, broccoli. Some cookbook authors are busy touting roasting and grilling the green stalks, but either method can quickly produce wrinkled, tough, overcooked asparagus. Give me a simple, brief boil any day: Boil about one inch of lightly salted water in a large skillet. Add trimmed asparagus spears in a single layer, if possible, the tips all on the same side. If you like, prop the tender, quick-cooking tips slightly out of the cooking water on a crumpled, flattened band of foil placed in the skillet. Cook uncovered a few minutes even for the thickest stalks. The tender tips will be done by the time the butt ends of the stalks are tender Before cooking, be sure to snap off the toughest butt ends and simmer them in soup stock or discard. For a company meal, or if you can't stand to eat too much nutritious dietary fiber, use a potato peeler to lightly scrape off most of the green peel from the lower half of each stalk. You'll lose most of the scales that way, but some of the good, grassy flavor, too. Even closely trimmed, raw asparagus is deli- Lightly cooking asparagus is a rite of the season cious as part of a vegetable platter for dipping, say with ranch dressing or watercress mayonnaise. I usually prefer to blanch the spears though, just a quick dip in deep, boiling water, to brighten the green color. The cardinal rule is to never overcook it, by any method. If you hold up one spear and it's bending low, it was cooked too long. It's also old-fashioned and unnecessary to ruin the vegetable's nutrition benefit by drowning it in melted butter or hollandaise. If you don't enjoy plain asparagus, try a light Asian stir-fry with diagonal cuts tossed with sesame seeds and sliced green onions. Or spread toasted sourdough bread with a thin layer of ham salad. Top with an evenly trimmed row of cooked spears for an asparagus raft. Drizzle with this sauce: Warm sour cream and flavor with grated onion, mayonnaise and yellow mustard. Garnish with sliced hard-cooked egg. Asparagus Mimosa 1 pound fresh asparagus, trimmed, cooked Marinade: VA cup canola oil Vi teaspoon seasoned salt Grindings of black pepper 1 teaspoon sugar 2 green onions, chopped 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 2 teaspoons chopped parsley 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 2 hard-cooked eggs, finely chopped or sieved Yield: 4 to 6 servings Marinate: At least 1 hour Arrange briefly cooked, drained asparagus in a square glass baking dish. Combine remaining ingredients, except eggs, to make a dressing, blending in a bit of grated lemon rind, if desired. Pour evenly over asparagus, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 1 hour, up to 8 hours. Vinaigrette may be used on another salad. To serve, placed drained asparagus on a small platter. Put sieved egg in a wide band across the spears just below the tips. T LOW-FAT COOKING Swiss steak also can be a low-fat offering Couple can make cookbook's bridal edition into keepsake By The Associated Press Swiss steak is a hearty favorite, but this recipe shows it can be a low-fat offering. Suggested accompaniments: mashed potatoes and snow peas. Slow-cooker instructions are included. This version is included in the new "Betty Crocker's Cookbook Bridal Edition," as well as in the standard edition. The bridal edition opens with a 32- page special section of items targeted for newlyweds — such as freezing the wedding cake and getting the kitchen organized. There is space for personal notes, lists and mementoes the couple can add to make this into a keepsake volume. The standard cookbook material follows the bridal section. Swiss Steak IVi-pound beef boneless round, tip or chuck steak, about %-inch thick 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon ground mustard T QUICK COOKING Yz teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1472-ounce can whole tomatoes, undrained 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1 cup water 1 large onion, sliced 1 large green bell pepper, sliced Cut beef into 6 serving pieces. Mix flour, mustard and salt. Sprinkle half of the flour mixture over 1 side of beef; pound in with meat mallet. Turn beef; pound in remaining flour mixture. Heat oil in 10-inch skillet over medium heat. Cook beef in oil about 15 minutes, turning once, until brown. Add tomatoes and garlic, breaking up tomatoes with a fork or snipping with kitchen scissors. Heat to boiling; reduce heat. Cover and simmer about V/i hours, spooning sauce occasionally over beef, until beef is tender. Add water, onion and bell pepper. Heat to boiling; reduce heat. Cover and simmer 5 to 8 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Makes 6 servings. Nutrition information per serving: 205 cal. (70 from fat), 8 The Associated Press Swiss Steak, as featured in "Betty Crocker's Cookbook Bridal Edition," serves as a low-fat meal when paired with mashed potatoes and green beans. g fat (2 g saturated fat). Slow-cooker directions: Omit water. Cut beef into 6 pieces. Mix flour, mustard and salt; coat beef (do not pound in). Heat oil in a 10-inch skillet over medium heat. Cook beef in oil until brown on both sides. Place beef in 31/2- to 6- quart slow cooker. Top with onion and bell pepper. Mix tomatoes and garlic; pour over beef and vegetables. Cover and cook on low heat setting 7 to 9 hours or until beef is tender. Rhubarb Chutney Va cup packed brown sugar Vi) cup cider vinegar Vi cup water Vi teaspoon salt 'A teaspoon dry mustard Vi teaspoon cinnamon Vs teaspoon ground cloves Vi cup chopped onion % cup raisins 2 cups chopped rhubarb % cup snipped dates Vi cup slivered almonds, toasted In a large nonstick saucepan over medium-high heat, combine brown sugar, vinegar, water, salt, dry mustard, cinnamon and cloves. Bring to a boil, stirring until sugar dissolves. Gently boil uncovered for 5 minutes. Stir in onion and raisins. Return to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, covered, for 20 miniites. Add rhubarb and dates; simmer uncovered for 10 minutes or until thick, stirring occasionally Meanwhile, toast slivered almonds in a small, dry skillet over medium heat. Shake pan and watch closely until nuts turn golden. Stir into the thickened chutney Cool and store in glass jars, covered, in the refrigerator for up to 1 month. Makes about 3 cups. Tip: Enjoy on crackers and peanut butter. Serve as a relish with ham, pork, chicken. • Recipe adapted from "Life's Little Rhubarb Cookbook: 101 Rhubarb Recipes" by Joan Bestwick. Honey-Orange Bean and Vegetable Salad 15-ounce can red kidney beans or large lima beans, or 1 Va cups cooked dry-packaged kidney or lima beans, rinsed and drained 15-ounce can navy beans or chickpeas, or 1 Vz cups cooked dry-packaged navy beans or chickpeas, rinsed and drained 15-ounce can pinto or red beans, or 1 Vz cups cooked dry- packaged pinto or red beans, rinsed and drained 2 cups thinly sliced red cabbage 1 cup small broccoli florets cup raisins Vfi cup sliced dried apricots % cup walnut pieces Combine all ingredients except Honey-Orange Dressing in salad bowl. Drizzle Honey-Orange Dressing over, and toss. Makes 8 side-dish servings of about % cup each. Honey-Orange Dressing: V& cup cider vinegar Vi to % cup honey 3 tablespoons frozen orange juice concentrate 2 tablespoons canola oil 2 teaspoons poppy seeds Mix ingredients thoroughly • Recipe from the Bean Education & Awareness Network From Wire Service Reports Cutlets are another Artful Chicken' idea By The Associated Press This quick and easy recipe for chicken comes from "The Artful Chicken," a new cookbook by Linda Arnaud. Chicken Cutlets with Chopped Tomatoes and Arugula 3 chicken breasts, boned, skinned, halved and pounded into y4 -inch-thick cutlets (6 pieces) Flour 2 eggs, lightly beaten 1 to 1 % cups focaccia bread crumbs, or other herbed bread crumbs 4 tablespoons olive oil, plus additional oil for serving 6 medium vine-ripened tomatoes, cut into large dice % pound arugula, coarsely chopped White wine vinegar The Associated Press Chicken Cutlets with Chopped Tomatoes and Arugula is In "The Artful Chicken." 6 tablespoons finely chopped fresh basil (optional) Wedge of Parmigiano-Reggiano or pecorino cheese (optional) Dredge the chicken cutlets in the flour, then dip them into the egg, letting the excess drop off. Coat the pieces thoroughly with the bread crumbs. Heat half of the oil in a heavy skillet that will hold three cutlets comfortably. When the oil is hot enough to sizzle, add the first batch of cutlets and fry them until the coating is evenly golden brown and the chicken is done, 2 to 3 minutes on each side. Adjust the heat as necessary Set the cutlets aside. Add the remaining oil to the skillet and repeat the process with the remaining cutlets. Arrange the chicken on individual serving plates. Divide the arugula and tomatoes over the cutlets. Pass the olive oil, vinegar, basil and cheese at the table. The dish may be served warm or at room temperature. Makes 6 servings. g {fltoEAT Tips by SHERRIE MAHONEY Home Economics Extension Agent Skillet scalloped potatoes C ook cup chopped onions in 1 tablespoon oil in skillet just until tender. Add 4 cups sliced potatoes and Vz cup water. Simmer over low heat for 20 to 25 minutes or until potatoes are done. Stir occasionally and add more water, if needed. Stir in 1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese and % cup evaporated milk (regular or skimmed). Heat on low until cheese melts. Do not boU. SUGGESTIONS? CALL BRET WALLACE, ASSISTANT EDITOR, AT 823-6363 OR 1-800-827-6363 OR E-MAIL AT sibwallace@saljournal.com

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