The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California on August 28, 1944 · Page 11
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California · Page 11

Publication:
Location:
Bakersfield, California
Issue Date:
Monday, August 28, 1944
Page:
Page 11
Start Free Trial
Cancel

MOJAVE MARINES INVADE STADIUM TONIGHT IHREE MAINS AT FISTICARENA GREAT CARD SET FOR FIGHT FANS TONIGHT Three main events are scheduled for tonight in the amateur boxing matches at Strelich Stadium when the ilojave marine base lighters iri- Vade the local field. Carl Hartzell is pitted against Peter Hayes in the first main. John Qjmney will fight Cal Coolidge in the second and Johnnie McHenry versus Hard Rock Harrigan are paired '" the third main, isteve titrelie.li announced today. In tlte Kemi-windup, Frank Luccio find Sam Hagland will blast away to maintain a winning streak. In the special, Pat Martinez and Kd Krasner will fight it out, and the openers are as follows: Warren Reader Versus John Brady; Baby Reyes versus Petie Costa; Frank Sox.a versus Gabe Jimenez and Gilbert Ktrada Versus Jose Prieto. PEPPER WILL VISIT L. A. JACKSONVILLE,. Fla., Aug. 2S. <JF> —United States Senator Claude Pepper (U-Fla.) has announced that he will speak in the Shrine Auditorium at L,os Angeles the night of. September 1, and deliver two addresses In the same city the following day as part of an extensive speaking tour. Miss Snow Drops Final Matches Carrying the flag of Kern county right to the last diteh of the national junior tennis championship play, Louise Snow, pretty IS-year-old Bakersfielrt net star, lost to Shirley Fry, 17. of Akron, Ohio, who is the new junior girls tennis champion of the nation. "Our Louise," playing against odds of climate and terrain, lost to the hardhitting Miss Fry. (i-0, fi-2, Saturday and also lost in the .Middle States tennis singles championship Sunday, dropping her match, 7-5, fi-2, to Dorothy Head, of Ala- ineda, Calif. In the national doubles play. Miss Snow and her partner, Sylvia Baker of Santa Monida, lost to Jean Doyle and Margaret Varner, 20-6(1, 7-5. Sacramento Police Nab 2, Seize Opium SACI1AMENTO, Aug. 28. (UP) — Two Chinese were arrested and $500 worth of opium, and opium-smoking equipment, were seined in a raid by police yesterday. The officers said patrons of the place included enlisted men of Chinese descent. I SYNTHETIC THE NEW U.S.ROYAL Even'tire men had their fingers crossed when they were faced with the job of building tires entirely from the new government synthetic rubber GR-S. Many' said it couldn't be done. But it was done! And in record time! Today, the new U.S. Royal DeLuxe' synthetic tire,'when driven at wartime speeds and' given the kind of care any good tire deserves is doing a job so good that it's dose to pre-war performance—' andiimprovementa are still being;made. When you; are Eligible; for; new tires, remember,'the new U.S. Royal DeLuxe synthetic tires are good tires! VENTILATED! it* open. •paced tread decign and deep-cut •boulders allow cooling air to circulate freely drawing heat away from the body of the tire. This u vitally important in aynthetic tire*. IPS SAFETY BONDED! Every cord i* bathed in a specially compounded solution that locks the cord* firmly into layers of synthetic rubber cushion. Safety Bonding means extra mile* of cafe service. IT'S MILEAGE-TESTED! In the laboratory and on the road, U.S. Royal DeLuxe synthetic tires •re mileage-tested, proving over and over again that "U. b." synthetic tire* Are food tires! TIRES ARE SCARCE First call on tires must go to our fighting forces. The rest of us have the job of making our present . tires last right on through the war if possible. Keep speeds down. Keep air pressure up. Recao in time! BUY WHERE YOU SEE THE U. S. TIRE SIGN This u the sign of a local, independent business built on experience, knowledge, skilled service and products of quality. U. 8. Distributed by JACKSON TIRE CO. 2200 Chester Avenue Phone 8-8404 There Is No Substitute for Good Workmanship! W. G. Willoughby Auto Repair Shop 2216 "Eye" Street SPORTS Cfje $atter*fielb Californtin Monday, Aug. 28, 1944 ANGELS TROUNCE STARS ME OTHERS DIVIDE TWIN BILLS IN WEEK-END HOW THEY STAND I' AC I Fit' COAM' l.K.U.l K Te;i Aiming for the I'acifie coast league wimlup, three weeks hence, ihe Los Angeles Angels maintained their championship form by defeating third-place Hollywood. ."i-H and 5-4 Sunday to achieve a near sweep in the week's series, fi-1. Other clubs divided their double hills. Sacramento beat second-place Portland, 3-1. and then dropped the nightcap, 4-.'!: fourth-place San Francisco downed Oakland 7-:! in the first gamp and lost the second <">-•">: and San Diego saved itself from a series blanking by drubbing Seattle. o-L'. but took a 2-1.1 nightcap licking. Ceorge Cornelias pitched his fourteenth victory of the season for Los Angeles in the first garni 1 . The Angels drove John Intlekolcr to the showers in the score-tying fifth inning of the second game as Reggie Otero doubled and Bill Sarini hom- ered. In the final inning Otero bunted Tony York in with the winning run. Portland's Roy llelser, trying for his twentieth win, was edged by Sacramento's Bud Bensley in the opener at Portland. The Beavers' Marino Pieretti chalked up bis twenty-first victory, however, in the nine-inning overtime closing game. Oakland grabbed an unearned hut game-winning run in the seventh frame of the second tilt with San Francisco. With the bags loaded, John Devincpni'.i drove to Third Baseman John t'avalli, who hobbled the catch and threw wild as Charley Knglish scored. Bob Joyce won his first game in a month in the opener. San Diego's Padres broke a five- game, losing streak to win the 5-2 opener at Seattle. Outfielder Jinny Abbott homed to start a four-run, sixth inning rally. l.us Aiiui'l'f SI iiiiii.vM,,nci . ..!.'.!L™""™"! 7:1 i la Mam] ............."—...~. :>' S;eM HM). rn.i i;s S;i II 1 ll-'Hu li:, ill ] Siilunljij 'fc KcMill* i II;.Maud. ."'. San l-'ian.'is. ... 1. [ I'milaniJ. ::: Sacra nn-nt'i, u. S'HI III-. S: S.m Iiii'Ko. "' uinly Blum's .-< hi'duli-d. I Yi'slerdii.v'* Ki'MiIls 1...S Ant-ell's. :,-.-,; Hullywiniil. 3-4. San Di.'Kn. 5-0: Spaillc. I'- 1 .'. San J-'i ioiriscd. 7-fi: oaklainj, H-fi. Sa< riiini'iilu. :!-:!; Pni-claniJ. 1-4. Nu KfOIH-H PI lHMlll!''ll. I Mi 4 7 J 14S NATIO.NAI. I.K.Uit K Team— \v,,n ].,,M IM. Si. I...IHH Mi ;KI .; 4 y Xi'\v v.ii-k ,M; i;.; j.v.i H i 41 41; \ <'slt'l'ilil>'N Kl'MiltH P.llolilllBll. I 1-1: HI. J.ciu.s. «-| (s Kami- U' . . alh-d ulu-r 10 iniiihKs. *" X''"' Vi.i-k.' .C-4. IliiMiUiyn. l-l 1 ('iii'Munali al chu ;a:», poMiiHjiH'd. dantt's TiMlii.v Pit IslHH'^li al (,'hn a^o. AMERICAN I.KAIil K Team— Won I.HSI IM. 'HI. hums 70 :,1 .;,ti Ni'w Yoi-k _ „ t;:, ;,i; .:,: Bns'liui _ ia: f,y .;,;: l'hdnd<'tpli ia li'i li 7 17 Chician :,7 fi'i .11',:: M'asliiiiKinn :,:' 71 .1L'3 *lialiH'.s tjohiinl luaii''!. Vi'strrdH.v'n Ki'KidlH npii-oil, r,-:' ; st. !.i uis. :',-i7. Hiisliin. S-;. Philadplplnii. fi-L'. .\i-\v Vurk, 4-4: WushinBUm. ^-5. Cleveland, 4-1: chjcai-'ii, a-u. Onnir* Tmhiy Biislnn ill "Now York. "Inly palno Hi'hr-itulPd ) LOOKS AND FEELS LIKE FINE IMPORTED SHETLAND LUXURIOUS PACAMOOR Gf thorobred if ever there was one We mean the suit . . . amlicntk-iill.v .sl.vlwl and tailored l>y CUITKK CRAFT of luxurious all-wool I'aco-inoor, the kind of fabric that you'd expect to find only in very expensive, custom made suits. But, we oin give you these handsome I'aca-nioors at tlie moderate price of #.'!.•;. because we're part of the famous CLIPlMOIt CRAFT PJ.AX that combines the buying power of 7-~>."i lending stores coast to coast. So, try on a CLIPPER CRAFT I'aca-iuour today. HARRISON'S SUITS FOR MEN 1618 19th Street Headquarters for Clipper-Craft—America's Only Nationally Radio Advertised Men's Clothes .* '^ 4 I I 1 1 II TILT OYBMKRS ST. LOUIS REGAINS POISE AFTER 9 LOSSES IN 12 By JOK l!i;i( III.KK A»U' .:H-I| Pi"-..; Spnus Wr.lor Rrai^n almost to their knees, tho lieu ildei'pd St. Louis Ill-owns ruse t'l'oin a ne;i r-l<noeUout blow \'ester- diiy In shiK out a diavv. Ilei-lillB Iroui :i .">•:! setback by the Detroit Timers, fur their fourth loss in a row and their ninth sethaek in 111-.* last 11 Kami's, the leaKiic-loadiiiK lirowns reioxered their equilibrium to pound out a 17-J nightcap victory over the Timers. The split enabled the American league pace-setters to retain their S'a game lead over the second place New Vork Yankees, who KOI no better than n draw with the Washington Senators. The Boston Tied Sox. however, moved into a tie for third by a double victory over the Philadelphia Athletics. Having emerged from their worst slump of the season with a si/eable lead, the Browns can look forward to the future with optimism. Of their :!ii reinainini; yames, ^;> will be played at home where they've won IIS and lost Hi for a .Tn4 percentage. Ami they've still to meet the (.'hi- can" White Sox. whom they've beaten nine out of Hi limes. The Yankees and lied Sox. on the other hand, \\ill have to finish on foreign soil. Joe McCarthy's men must play L'3 of their remaining ;;•! games away from home while the Sox will cujrago in _-' of their ;>0 contests in rival fields. Both have played under .51)0 ball away from home thus far. The Tigers have L"J imiining .'ill games at they've managed to win only L'!) yames while dropping' "S home games. The Browns came to life in the nightcap, pounding' five Tiger hurlers for six runs in each of the second and third innings and four in the seventh. George AlcQuinn paced the Browns with four hits, as Nelson 1'otter doled out five hits, for his thirteenth victory. The Yankees missed an opportunity to gain a full game on the Browns when they dropped the second game. 5-4. after winning- the opener from the Senators, 4--. A pinch single by Wilfred Lefcbvre with two out and the bases full scores the winning run in the ninth. George Stirnweiss, Yankees' bitter, was stopped after hitting in 17 straight contests. The Red Sox double win over the Athletics, 8-5 and 7--, ended a five- game losing streak. Hob Johnson paced the Keil Sox with five hits, three in the second game. For the first time this season, the .St. Louis Cardinals failed to win at least one game on a Sunday, when they dropped l' ie opener, 14-li, to the Pittsburgh Pirates and tied the se ond, 1-1 in 10 innings, halted darkness. Delano Tigers Claw Lamont in Great Diamond Thriller Monday, Aug. 28, 1944 ] ] WEST CORST OX THEATRES lt.v ( . P\I« MI.K FOR VICTORY BUY BONDS! Standing loe tn toe, two great ; ! gladiators of the baseball diamond; slugged it out Saturday night at Sam ' Lynn Park, playing a fining—if! somewhat boisterous—closing symphony to the second half of the sum- I mer reerealion league. \\'ith the IV I.ino Tigers winning over the La- niiuit Merchants. I to :',. in a game ; which tor pure diamond drama has had few eiiuals on this or any other field. : j It \vas strictly a, pitchers' hatlle. i will) Lamonl touching Dcrdivunis. curve hall artist for the Tigers, |,,r : only four hingles. while the Dclam | nine was lapping the veteran Dm i Tilsworlh for six, [our of which came in a fatal sixth inning, when the ' rampaging Timers scored three runs I and went into the load. 4 runs to '2, j at that singe of the game, i Large, Small Guns to Be Allowed in Shoot of their vc- home. Bnt by ! la-nest Uoiix. president of the i Kern County Pistol Club, calls at- Itention to Friday's story concerning the club's shoot to be held Oe, tuber uj, in which it was said thai only small bore pistols were to he 'allowed, and points out that hoi h \ small and large bore guns may be i used. i The event will lake place at the pislol range in Kern Kiver Park, ; with individuals and teams compel-| ing for a $LT> war bond to be awarded j by Sheriff John Uoiistalot for the j best, marksmanship. ' The next meeting of the pisloleers will be held in the offices of Sheriff I l.oiislalot September -0, beginning' at S p. in. j Membership in the club is open ! to any marksman and the annual fee of $;! covers membership in the American Itil'lo Association, a year's subscription to the American Rifle- nuin and ll' month's dues for local club membership, Mr. lloux stated. Jepsen Reigns as Trapshoot Monarch Ity IIAItOI.D HAKKI8ON YAXnAUA. Ohio, Any. L'S. (&) — A 45-year-old Dwight, 111., electrician who was so nervous at the finish he couldn t remember his own age, reigned today as the grand American handicap trapshoot king. The winner of that most prized trapshooting crown was Leslie C. Jepsen. The other major title yesterday went to I-ieutenant Vic Heindcrs of Waukesha. Wis., and Brooks Field, Texas. The husky TIelnders, who rates as one of the nation's top trap- shooters, won the all-around championship after a shoot-off with J. K. Stark of San Antonio, Texas. Bakersfield All-Stars Win 4-2 Decision Over Raiders There's no doubt about it. Bakers- ifeld's All-Star team is good. J-'or the second time this year, outside champions have found this out, the latest beiiiR the Hammer Field Raiders who bit the dut, 4-2, last night at the fairgrounds. Alex Germanetti, the finest softball artist in the slate when he is in lop form, got into that form in a hurry last, night after a couple of innings of stage fright, and settled down to whip the Raiders decisively with the aid of his teammates who rallied beautifully to his signal. STOP LOOSI OINTAL FIATIS MOYhelpt hold dental plates 4 to 12 hour* longer! Creates toft, SUM, tront-l parent suction | cuthionl .Hermit Lym-h, Haider pitcher who used to duel with C!oniinnotli in the pre-war bast-hall days, did all right until the All-Stars solved his de- j liveries, theiu-e was pretty handi- | cupped. The Raiders took advantage of Cjprmani'lti's parly-same wildness to score their only two runs, then in the second inning, the All-Stars opened up to tie the seore. In the third frame, Harrier, I'niou Paving- stnr, swatted a home run over the right field fence, liringing- in Morris, also a former I'nion raver arid this mat- gin the All-Stars held throughout the remainder of the game by smart fielding- and (lermanetti's pitching-. The following players made up the All-Stars; Germanelti, pitcher; I ley- art and John r'rancls, catchers; Broolishire, first base; Maddux, second base; Martin and . Kaehr, third hasp; Morris, shortstop; Walten- harger, short fielder; Harper, left fielder; Jj. Francis and Arhtira, I center fielder; Oxanich, right fielder. :\ M|N Not* c •nur* r*v ««oct fit «» ••oilabl* t>i»t 5-H. . lhi AAA (• in . . •" bloch - nit M tii0»tMr J_ 1§ /l/o oMiet 4ti&e pived you, rill 7 &I; tkeAe SOLID COMFORT j i eaiuA^i Skillfully styled, in beautifully finished hand- boarded veal leathers of mellow comfort and rich tones. In-built quality withstands today's hard wear .*. SOLID COMFORT reitt your feet in action. HARRISON'S SHOES FOR MEN 1618 Nineteenth Street Lamont. not only Sil'ahhrd lillt deeply hurt by tin- fangs ..i the Tiger, stiuek h.ii-k \aliantly Imt its el'lorls, except in the lnp lialt' of tin- eighth inning. \>i-nt for naught. In tli.it inning. Harper. fir>t. 111:111 ill', woikcd I >ei diva ins fur a walk. UK Ili-lil ills! as I layncs llew nut tn i-t'MtiT Inn aihami'd Ii.i second ulna \<iT. Tiger shortstop, hobbled Tils- woi Ih 's HI oiindcr ami liutli were sal'". l.nsk i|<iiili|i-ii sluing Harper, HIM! iln- stands went uilil, Imt I'cm lnt a lini- drive tn thinl. who prornpilv stepped mi ilii- base, doubling Tils- Wiil'lll 1'iir tin- 1 11, |-il nut. Delano went out in onli-i- in the liottiiiii hall n;' the eighth Inn L.I. intuit could iln no better in its fust half of the ninth ami the hall game WHS over, with tin- Tigers winning. -1 to H. Delano got in Tilsworth, I.anmn! pili her. for just .six hiis, four of whirh c-nini 1 in that fatal .sixth. La- nionl. never able to hit very strongly against the Tigers, not just four hits off Denlivanis, whose only fault was his wildness. The first of the two-out-ol'-thrpp playoff games In deccide the. HM-l league i-hainpion helween the \vinnri- , of the first ha IT — I he Bakei sfielil Cubs—and I IIP winner of the second half — the Delano Timers — will he played next Wednesday night at Sam Lynn Park. The suhsetiuent schedule is still in : Hie making, j NOW—Shows at 7:00-9:30 Feature at 7:20-9:50 Doors Open at 6:3O EXTRA! Color Cartoon - News RIVERA Last Times Tonight "THEY DARE NOT LOVE" "BROADWAY BILL" 'ARVIN Last Times Tonight "CRY HAVOC" "OUTLAW OF SANTA FE" Last Times Tonight "FOUR JILLS AND A JEEP" "Twilight on the Prairie" N ra ra • L H B&3 th S( - P/W NOW—DOORS OPEN 6:45 Raw, Relentless, Romantic, Human with Humphrey Bogart Marjorie Main Sylvia Sidney, Joel McCrea v . » * CALIEORNIA Open Daily at 12 Noon NOW PLAYING William Powell, H«dy Lamarr in "THE HEAVENLY BODY" Gene Autry, Smiley Burnette in "ROOTIN', TOOTIN' RHYTHM" CARTOON NEWS "THE BLACK SWAN" "THE LARAMIE TRAIL" 1808 Chester NOW BOYKk Inqtid BERGMAN )o*eph COTTEH MATINEE DAILY DOORS OPEN 1:30 CO-FEATURE HI I305 iqth St Continuous Daily From 12 Noon Tonto Basin Tyrone Power in Outlaw Crash Dive Plus Latest News BAKERSFIELD TOMORROW Kentucky Street Show Grounds COLE BROS THIS YEA R,,~ GREATER AND DIFFERENT MULTITUDES OF NEW CIRCUS WIZARDS NEVER BEFORE SEEN IN AMERICA THE STUPENDOUS NEW OPENING SUPER-SPECTACLE CASTLE OF TAJ MAHAL MOST GORGEOUS PAGEANT IN ALL HISTORY THE WORLD'S FOREMOST RIDERS FROM THE HORSE SHOWS OF ALL NATIONS IN AN EXHIBITION UNPARALLELED The FLYING THRILLERS CO N COLLEANO GREATEST OF ALL TIGHT WIRE STARS WORLD FAMOUS ANTALEKS iREATH - TAKING HIGH PERCH PERFORMERS BIGGER-GRANDER-THAN EVER THE ORIGINAL HODGINI FAMILY • AREIACK RIDING CHAMPIONS IBAN ALLEN DwiM RM« el REARING and WALTZING HORSES THE MIGHTIEST AGGREGATION OF CIRCUS CHAMPIONS EVER ASSEMBLED MEN AND WOMEN SPANOLELAND STARS 2SO-p H g N fg|-2SO 50 CLOWNS SO 3—HERDS—3 ELEPHANTS GIGANTIC RAILROAD SHOW—INDIGO HUE—BIO TOP .HUGE SIX POLE TWO PERFORMANCE! DULY AT 1:1111:N P. M, I DOORS OPEN AT 2:00 & 7:00 P. M. I WITH WILD JUNGLE BEASTS FROM ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD POPULAR PRICES to* <hl* ^™- n _. —v^^— •mbei e« *••!• 4eV>l'«<l to kvyen'el Wu •••4*} diew >«mu M* •ecmi* eeal i«»e«»«H»«t ta Mvamee* Tickets (R*s«rv« and Admission) on ftalo Show Day at Vest's Drug Store, Nineteenth and Chester

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free