The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on October 26, 1951 · Page 9
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 9

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Friday, October 26, 1951
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Page 9
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PAGE FOURTEEN Arkansas N&vs Briefs— Highway Department Under Investigation By THE ASSOCIATED PKKSS LITTLE ROCK—An Immediate Investigation for possible law violation: in the State Highway Department operations has been ordered by the Arkansas Highway Audit Commission. Cooper Jacowny of Little Rock was hired yesterday Ei special counsel lor the commission. He was instructed to begin ills investigation immediately. Jacoway it to confer with representatives of Peat, Warwick and Mitchell, the St. Louts firm making the audit of the Department for the commission. The auditors are suppased to torn over to him any questionable items which have beon uncovered and which need further investigation. Clothing Firm to Concentrate in Arkansas ROCKFGRD, Jii.—The Roekford plant of w. Slianhouse Sons, fnc., clothing manufacturers, will be closed and all of the company's proudc- tlon will be handled it plants in Hope and Magnolia, Ark. Leonard shanhousc, president of the firm, said yesterday that a dwindling labor supply and high production casts forced the action. The company manufactures Jackets, sports jackets and sport shirts. *hysical Education for Grade Students Is Teacher's Plan Gl Accuses 'Best Friend' of Breaking up Home LITTLE ROCK— Kenneth L. Luciis. a former Lonokc, Ark., teacher has accused his best friend of breaking up his home. Lucas, who now Is serving In Korea, filed a law suit here yesterday seeking $50,000 in damages against Charles H. Bishop, Little Hock service station operator. The suit, filed through Lucas' attorney,.charBCd Bishop with alienation or affections of Lucas' cx-wlfe, Wilma. Man Questioned about 1942 Arkansas Murder DETROIT, Oct. 20. (/Iv-A (JS-year-old man held here In a stabbing case will be questioned about a 1S42 slaying In Arkansas. Jnck Pool WHS arrested yesterday on a complaint of a woman that he stubbed her with > fingernail flic during an argument. Police Inspector Edward Heilly said the woman had told officers that Pool has boasted to her of "killing a man with a crank handle" north of Little Hock several yacrs ago. The beaten body of Charles F. Berry, 60, was, found ncnr Little Rock on May 20, 1042. 'Abdullah' King's Wife Seeks Annulment-He Woos Moslem HOUSTON, Oct. 26. (!?> — Slicp- pard <AbduUah) King's wife has filed an. annulment petition claiming "fancy drinks" deprived her of her reason and will power when she remarried the tall Texan last June 2. It was the first step In netting the wealthy redhead married off to a royal Egyptian belly dancer named Sambla Gamal. Mrs. King said she didn't even remember her ' second marriage.. Her petition. In District 'Court, here and expected to be acted upon Monday, claimed h a r husband "tricked" her Into getting a blood certificate—necessary for n marriage license in Texas—saying it was necessary for their boy to attend a America by Christmas. There has been no comment fron Ills socially prominent mother, Mr. Boniier King. She threatened t disinherit him. King says she can't that he'll take disinheritance pro ceedlngs to court. summer camp. King, a Moslem now with the Abdullah, met, wooqd nnd won the hand of Snmbla in just three hours time. He wns on an European holiday. He said he hoped to marry Sambin In Cairo nnd bring her to Eccentric 'Fan' Stabs Scientist ' OOETTINGEN. Germany. Oct. 26. W)—Police today blamed an eccentric science Ian for the stabbing ot Prof. Otto Halm. German atom expert and Nobel Prize winner. The 72-yenr-old Hnhn, who won the 194-1 Nobel chemistry prize was slightly wounded In the shoulder when attacked Wednesday night. Jcsef Kastner, 2P, \vho turned himself in as the assailant, sent Harm au Incoherent letter from his jail celt declaring the professor had led him "wiltiout any remedy, into antagonism." Poliri; s.iid Knstner had been seiulinE: ll.iim rambling letters for several >e.'.r3 on pseudo-scientific subjects. BLYTHEVILWO (ARK.) CQURIER NEWS Pigeons to Get WingedMicke And Transfer PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 26. (AP) For live years Herbert Packer 1 been trying t o do something abi all those pigeons Ihnt Infest I city's strcels nnd squares It's official with Packer, becau he's on the staff of the Housing nnd Sanitation Department. In order to make good on the project hos had a shot at Ivappine the pigeons, wheedling n,cni. n nd at various forms of intimidation Nothing worked. Now Packer thinks he fins it_ n harmless knockout drop slipped into the pigeons' food. Something like this was attempted In a town In Scotland months ago. Pestering pig. cons were Jed mnsh soskcd In Ifn- •ior—but they flourished on the piked stuff. ' ! ' ' j Illlw AUUftt'U <• i acKcr snys his chemical (brinuln' up and caged. By RUTH LEE (tkhool Corrnpumkut) An adequate, supervised physical ducatlon program Is Just as im- ortant lor elementary as lor .fun- in high and high school children. This is a firm conviction held by •a B. Green, one of Junior High's ew teachers, who plans to set up uch a program in the Hlythevllle iementary schools during the next i lonth or so. Teaching five, seventh grade scl- nce classes at Junior High doe» i ot allow him much time for this ctlvity. but by obtaining the co- peratlon of the elementary leach- rs, he feels each school will be noro than able to work out an or- anized and supervised 'program. Mr. Green feels that of all ages, ears six through 12 are the most mportant for developing correct wsture, acceptable manners, and ood health habits—all of which hould be the primary gcals of systematic physical education within he school curriculum. Need Added Half Hour In addition to their reguhir play periods, primary children should bc+- jermltted at least 30 minutes daily j or supervised play, with emphasis upon running and jumping, he (eels. Polk dancing of the type requiring hese activities is e.ssiccially desira- jle for this level, one reason for his being the children's wllling- 1C55 to participate. The idea of physical education as something to "suffer through" has lot vanished from the minds of »tudents, teachers and parents, he says, but feels this Is oils reason for arranging an attractive, worthwhile program. In grades four through six, stress should be placed uiwn team games such" as dodgebiill, klckball, line soccer and others which provide opportunities for cooperation with other people and stricter coordination. Folk dancing in mixed groups and planned with special attention to variety is also an excellent activity for. this level, lie believes. Making such a program work will necessitate close cooperation from the classroom teacher, he realizes, out feels sure that each Instructor Is already aware ol the significance of physical education in the elementary system. Would Assist Teacher His part of the work will be providing EI handbook for each teacher, assisting her In setting up a program for licr room, and serving as consultant throughout the year. Physical education Is not Just a sideline with Mr. Green, a fact which his master ot science degree in physical education from the University of Tennessee will henr out. During his year tit the University, he held a graduate fellowship which provided him an opportunity to set up a physical education program in the Knoxvllle elementary schools. Green is a native Arkansan who claims Thornton as his hometown. In addition to his master's degree, he holds a bachelor of science engineering ' from Henderson State ."Teachers College where he played .football, basketball • and track. He "attended Arkansas Tech for junior college after graduating In 1945 from Thornton High School where he lettered In basketball nnd track- In June, 1945, he entered the Army, received his bnslc training in Texns', and later went to Germany as a communications sergeant. lu BIythevllle, the Greens reside at 1033 Chlckasawba and are mem bcrs of First Methodist Church. Ira B, Oreen Sentimentality Pays Dividend in California SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 26. CAP —Richard Adams struck burlei treasure—bccnu.se he was scntlmen tnl about his wedding. Shortly after he was married, n explained, he found some rice lode cd In the pockets of his weddini suit. The Adamses planted It In i small container and before long hai u rice paddy too large tor a win dow pot. So yesterday Adams took It to hi place of business, where he rent trucks, and began to dig a seed be in front of the building. His shove clanked ngnlnst metal. Adams ended up with enough roll )f nickels, dimes and quarters, per naps burled by a robber nnd forgot .en, to fill a coffee can. He wasn saying the amount, because "I don want to start n silver rush on m >roperty, or be deluged with claim ants." The treasure will be cleaned an lolished ns an anniversary gift fo Ills wife, Lorcne. —he calls it "the winged mickey"— will knock out the pigeons In 12 .seconds nt most and they won't even have n hangover. Once the birds d out, they'll bo gathered Truman Is Still Mad at Douglas WASHINGTON, Oct. 56. OT President Truman made it clei yesterday he has not softened h critical attitude' toward Senate Douglas (D-I11). Told that Douglas was circulrd Ing eight names as prospective fee end court judge rccommendatioi among members of the Chicago ba Mr. Truman snid crisply at his ncv coniereuce that the Dnr Associate rtccsn't make prasidenti.it nppoin ments. Two court nominees named t the President were rejected by tl Senate in the last session ol Co: grcss because of Douglas' oppos lion. Mr. Truman said he had sou new names in mind to be stibmi teei to the Senate at its next ing. mec State Nn. 81-IO:> Hescrvc District No. 8 RKl'ORT OF CONDITION' OF THE FARMERS BANK AND TRUST COMPANY of niythevllle, Arkansas, a member of the Federal Reserve System nt the close ot business on October 10, 1951, published In mxorrt.incc wilh a call made by the Federal Reserve bank o! this district pursuant to the provisions ot the Federal Reserve Act. ASS 1C T S Cash, balances with other bunks. Including reserve balance and cash items ui process of collection $° 50.1 "13 33 United states Government obligations, direct and guaranteed IMlb'iJoo'oil Obligations of St.itcs nnd uolltlcnl subdivisions . .. 5500000 Corporate stocks (including $18,000.00 stock ol Federal lie serve bank! ISOJOOi) Loans and discounts (including S2.J75.50 ou-iciraftsi -I 0-0 6-il'>;) i liunk premises owned $57,500.00. furniture and fixtures $1X0.. ' SToOloo Other assets ... ASSETS J8.95I.073.25 L I A H 11.1 T I K S Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations . L S60"ME)07"4 Time deposits of Individuals, partnerships,'and"corporations'.'.' 1,0-I7,W?5 Deposits ol United States Government (including postal savings) ,^ Deposits of Slates and political subdivisions .'.. Deposits ot bunks Other deposits (certified and officers' checks etc i TOTA1, DEPOSITS !' " Otbcr liabilities J. G. "Bob" Barnes Glcncoc Bld{. South 2nd St. Bfrthcvlllt, Atk. Phone 43«« 89.240.61 381.417.82 465.893.22 56,056,02 -16.297.15 TOTAL LIABILITIES (not including subordinated obli- gallons shown below) $8.110,925.11 Capital- Surplus Undivided CATITAL ACCOUNTS profits 200,000.00 •100.000.00 243.148.14 TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 843.143.14 TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS .JMSfOTsU •This bank's cnpil.il consists ot: Common stock with total par value of $200,000.00. M F, HIM O R A N D A Assets pledged or .ixslgned to secure liabilities and for other lwr P°' cs ; S 115.000.00 Loans as shown above arc after deduction of reserves of.... 20.144.85 I, B. A. Lynch, President of the above-named bank, hereby ci-vlUy tli.it Ilic above tenement Is true to the best of my knowledge and belief. B. A. LYNCH Correct—A (test: J. L. Cherry L. K. Welch F. D. Warren, Directors. r*motur« Baby Catchci Ip in His Pint Year ocToeca ST. LOUIS, Oct. 26. W)— Michael harles Meyer hasn't been wasting Uiy time since his birth a year ago. When bom. three months pre- laturely, he weighed Just 2 pounds. ounce. Today lie weighs 17 pounds, ! ounces. Hbj mother, 'Mrs. Walter F. Meyer, says he has live teeth and a ronderful appetite. Generally babies triple then- birth 'eight In the first year. SUOSAJlSER RINSES Only Whirlpool IMJ and the- Sevan Rlntct — the famous Whirlpool features thnt save precious fuel, soap, hot water . . . £ct clothes extra clean, sparkling bright. Other matchless Whirlpool ExchiStVOS: AgiFlo\v Action. Crete-font Sfsnol. liftCool Finlihl For today's Hig Difference in Automatic ^ J J 95 Washing, set \ I j\ Whirlpool! J I " HALSELL '& WHITE Furn. Co. PRESCRIPTIONS Fresh Stock Guaranteed Beat Prices Kirby Drug Stores Prospector Spends Eight Days Locked in Empty Freight Car PRIEST RIVER, Idaho. Oct. 26 —"t pounded and called for days- hut nobody heard me." This l s how 47-year-old Pred Howerton dMcrlbed his attempts to get help while Imprisoned in a freight car without food for eight days. With his voice almost gone, he finally attracted attention and was Hilled /rom ths box car "looking 70 years old." Howerton. a pros|>ecU>r from Pratt, Kas.,-jumped onto the car at Troy, Mont., hoping to head for Washington state whore he HM a mining claim. A brakeinan locked the car door just before it pulled out at Troy. Howerton told Dr. L. J. Staulfer today. And after the car had traveled 100 miles, it was pulled onto a at could S«ar the running along )ti«hw«r M. •*$ 1 pounded mid caHed for -^ji' >ul nobody h«»rd me." h« s*M. When he finaHy »»s Tuesday, Howerton )»od a Inch beard. His fe«t w*w a condition brought on by tlon. , Trie prospector uld he had »o«»>ed the days by keeping tract al to* alternate light and dwhMM through a small nail Hofa !• ttw side of the car. 'f'3- Hospital attendant* beUew to " will tx able to leave the hotpfcoi In two weeks. Trans World*.. m wither incurs dream \Veother wise is this handsome Trans World* coaf of sturdy worsted gaberdine. A tighf topcoat one day, a warm overcoat the next—simply by zipping in itt colorful wool lining. When you buy a topcoat, be surt you know the material content. Check every garment carefully.

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