The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on October 7, 1949 · Page 7
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 7

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Friday, October 7, 1949
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Page 7
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PRTBAY, OCTOBER 7, 1949 ; BLYTHEVILLE (AKK.)V COURIER NEWS PAGE SEVEN land Bank Loans Show Increase Arkansas Figures Reflect 11 Per Cent Gain Over Year Ago Waller H. Droste. president of the Federal Land Bank of St. Louis, reports that during the fiscal year ending June 30, *he bank, through "local national farm loan asso'cla- I tlorr. made 3.262 loans totaling 515,459,431 to f ami era in Arkansas, Illinois, and Missouri. This Is an increase over a year ago of 14 per cent hi 'number and 19 per cent In the amount of loans closed. In Arkansas, loans were made to 181 'fanners during the past £ear, which is an '^crease of 11 per cent over a yeir apo. . Mr. Dro.ste said that each year since June 30, 1938, the amount repaid on outstanding loans lias exceeded the mount of new loans closed by ihe Federal ^and Bunk of St. Louis. For the first time In 11 years, this trend has been re versed and the past fiscal year shows an increase of one per cent hi trie amount of loans outstanding Total farm raortp.a^e debt in the United Slates declined substantial ly during, the war period, reaching a 34-year low January 1, 1946. Tota farm .mortgage debt has increased each year since January 1, 194G with.'.an increase of '4.6 per cen reported for 1948. On January l 19-19. the total "form mo rig ago deb in ihe United States was $5,108,183. . coo. - : The decline in net farm incomi in recent months is reflected in i two per cent decrease in farm rea* estate'prices over the United States during the fourth months' period ending July 1. 1949. Arkansas farm real estate prices decreased 5 per cent during this four months' pcr- e . iod. Farm real estate prices In the ikUnited States on July I,. 1949, were "slightly below 'the average on July 1, 1948. Tills is ihe first tinie since 1939 that the national average, of farm real estate prices has dropped below the same date of the previous Use of Certified Seed Nets Farmer Larger Income " - of certified seed'lias made Halsell of Promised Land and xtra $20 per acre this year, he has reported to County Agent Keith Bilbrey, . , - > • . Mr. Halsell planted certified S- in Misico Growers of Certified Seed 00 soybeans alongside field ; run S-1C1 from an undetermined origin, ile- combined 40.5 bushels per, acre -i-oin the certified beans last week and only 28 bushels per acre from :he commercial grade seed. All of tlir seed was Inoculated. • In the case of S-IOO soybeans Mr. Hilbrey suggests that all' farmers should plant certified seed, or know positively'they came from cerllftrd seed the yp'af before. There seems to bo two or three grades or selcc- lio's out and the Missouri Experiment Sation i-ciimed only the bc,«t pi-mlueing selection, Mr. Bilbrey indicated. The certified S-IOO' was released to the scim-al public in'1948. for Ihe first time, he suld. The Stale Plant Board this week listed tlic names, of 11 Mississippi County planters as breeders of registered and certified cotton and soybean .sped. Inducted In the number were the names of one planter as a breeder of registered cotton seed, one as a breeder of registered soybeans, five as breeders of certified bule lag cottonseed and seven ns breeders of ccrlified blue Ing soybeans. The only realslererl cottonsrrd breeder Hsled by the Plant Board in the comity is (he Hale Seed Farm of niirdelte, wnieh Is also h'sled as breeders of registered .soybeans. Certified breeders were: cottonseed — F. P. Jacobs. Jr. .Osceola; Earl Magers, Dell: Bnrdettc Plnnta- tlon. DM; nrynnt Farm's, Leach- vlllc! and J. M. Stevens. Dell. Sov- bcans — mircl«l.lc Plantation, riur- -t' 1 ; .). M. Stevens. Dell; n. c Land Company. Lcnchvlllc; ^ uncl Magcrs and Ciill of Dell. No Partiality Shown DENVER, Oct. 1— W—Patrolman Gerald J. Sheehan took six-year- old Nancy Jo Wagner to a hospital yesterday for treatment of a dog Then he went back to ivarn Ihe Ills' ova. owner about the biting dog The owner wasn't home. The dog was. He greeted the patrolman with a bite In the hip. Slieeham went back to the hospital for an anti-tetanus shot of ~ T NEW 1 WKAPON IN THE WAR ON BIKIS— The big machine moving down Harris farm near Navasota, Tex., is a mechanical bu Moss Meeting Is Called To Discuss Dam Proposal DONPHAN Mo O?t 7 <AP) _ r The Donlphan Chamber, 'of Coin- catcher. The catcher uses fierce olasts of air to fr;rce i mcree yesterday called a : meeting to be held at the boll „ u _. „..„ the Brazos River bottoms of Texas lias Increased cotton yields from as low as one-tenth of a bale per acre to as high as two bates per acre. - . . worms into its collecting funnels. Once caught, the worms are burned. Use of the new bu« cuiclicr !n I " lcetlnK to be lu ' 1(l Ht lllc court Brazos River bottoms of Texas lias Increased i-otton vielris from as low as ,m,Or.,,M, n r * i«i- „-.,..„...„ I !\ on ' c Saturday•nftmioDi) al which Garden Vegetables for Winter Use Saved by Simple Storage Methods Truman Asks Boyle's Aid In Appointment Dispute WASHINGTON, O:t. 7. (AP) —. President... Truman said yesterday he had asked Democratic Chairman William it. Boyle, J;-., to stir up .support,..among state Readers, .for. confirmation of Lelanrf Olds oil tile. Federal Power Commission, this was a very proper tiling to,do. He told a news conference that He said he has to have party dlsr. cipline if he is to transact Ihe business of the government and .carry out the party platform. : A Senate committee had reported adversely on Olds' nomination for a third term despite the President's letter to ..the Senate saying "powerful corporations" Tvere out to defeat his nominee. Vegetables which i &main in good condition in the home vegetable garden after frosts begin may easily be stored safely - for winter use. Kale, Brussels sprouts, parsnips and salsify will stand'freezing, and are usually left In . the garden and harvested as needed .until just before the ground freezes deeply. If -parsnips and salsify are dug nt this stage, washed and enough for one meal packed In a paper bag, the bags can be stored outdoors in any convenient place where they will remain dry and safe from animals. They can be taken into j the kitchen and thawed out for use as needed, .Tomatoes should be harvested .fter the first hard frost. Many can be ripened if laid on a shelf in a warm basement; some prefer to hang them up. still attached to the. vine. i Sand Good For Pac*in£ 'Carrots, beets, turnips,' rutabagas, potatoes, .apples and cabbages can be stored in an nnhealed garage or shed for several weeks, until the outside temperatures have fallen to several degrees below freezing. If the carrots, beets and turnips are placed in boxes packed in soil, which is kept moist, in the protection of the garage or shed they will keep well except in extremely low temperatures. Sand is not good for ;this packing, as it docs not retain moisture well. Potatoes should not be packed in this way. Pumpkins, squash and sweet potatoes should be stored in a temperature between 55 and OS- de- gn'cs, which is often foiitid in a healed basement. The crops requiring lower temperatures may be kept in heated basements for some time flood Cm-rent River will be-discussed. James Pcathei-ston,. who l.s president of the chamber and also sheriff of Riplcy County, said sentiment favoring the development program proiMscd by the United State.s Army Engineers is growing rapidly. Ile •said a poll taken of business men in Doniplutn showed 17 out of 58 lav- Senate Committee Okays Flexible Price Supports WASHINGTON,) Oct. 6-^fl'j—The Senate Agrienltuic . .Committee to-1 day approved, 9 .to 3, a flexible; farm'price support bill. Democratic I . v, - --- .Leader Lucas of Illinois said it i •time irthey »ve packed m boxes W ill be brought before the Senate' Wll.n U'PT. S3 nrf nhniit t tiPin t,,. • I benefits 'from the proposed control-and power 'dam on supporting the Idea. orcd ihe phm and signed petitions with \vet sand about them. Where the quanUty to be stored tomorrow. — .., , „ ^^ „„— Lucas described the bill as follow- : , does not warrant an expensive out- ing the lines of the long-range- door root cellar various adaptations farm measure originally introduced ; of the Idea may be used.-. • : . .by Senator Anderson (b-NM). | ^Vegetables stored should be in •' Tne Senate sent'; the - Anderson ! good condition, not too oid or too btu hlvck lo the Agriculture ,Com-; immature; and tender vegetables" m 'ttce Tuesday night, after Vice ii-r.cnVi iiQ,,a (,»,-!„ I *^ r . f , c .nrt i~ r^n^*-.President Berkley had broken a tie' to give Senate approval of an am-j cntiment for price props under j major crops at 90 per cent'parity. I -/(Parity is a price level calculated ' to give farmers the same 'returns j tin iheir crops, measured in things they buy,*, that they .had In ~a past favorable period.) \ tiEhtJy^itirthe-t^pirarurel^e j.^™^^'^^°y^!^^ • committee vote yinci the iiejdble'7^ to 90 per cent provision favored'by- Pictures You Will Like > \Yc specialize in conitnurci:;! mid home i'lVitils. . , piclu.i-cfs wliicli ynii will oujoy thii»iiglv«ul (lie years. Cali for !i])poiiilnien(s. : f'lione (iOH ^s^jy, 1ST FILMS VDEVEIOPED PRINTED ENLARGED FAUGHTS STUDIO U2.St)ii(h Is!. .{Night lMume.6321) consider tfiese features: Simple Design — No complicated'drives. "'Full Jcviclcd." Every bearing a ball or roller. Quality Construction — Higher resole values prove this Auger typo harvester with Direct forced feed to cylinder Over 10 feel of Separating length. ' ' Rugged — Dependable —,Hos the stomlno to stand lona flrlndi without time consuming breakdowns. Independent structural steel shockprooj frarn«. : Drop forged steel reversible cylinder bars, ' ' Over- 45,000 satisfied owners. . • A practical combine —- every farmer con of/ord, Available in socker or groin bin models. ' See It Today at JACK ROBINSON 500 East Main Phone 2371 should never be stored, \void vegetables with bruises or skin punctures as decay will start from these, and never store vegetables which a re wet. Even the hardiest vegetables should not be stored if they have been frozen- Do not close oudoor root cellars . has dropped close to freezing, and d6 not cover vegetables in earth Pits until the sou has cooled off ; thoroughly Andrrson returned ,to the measure. Onions Can Be Grown 'n Gardens for Use Around the Calendar I help farmers to farm FASTER I'll show you how to farm faster . . .and better, too ... if you'll let me demonstrate a new Ford Traclor right on your farm. I'll prove that, with a Ford Tractor, you can keep gaining on your work instead of getting behind'.' Yoii have no idea how much (ime you save with Hydraulic Touch Control of implements, new, faster 4-spced transmission and a lot of other advantages this new Ford Tractor has. And, my. ser- .vice is the best. So how about telling me to bring out a Tracfor and put bti a demonstration? There's no obligation. Russell Phillips Tractor Co. Allen Hardin, Mgr. Highway 61 South, Blytheville, Detroit Feels Pinch Of Steel Plant Strikes- Detroit, Oct. 7. CAP)--Detroit began feeling the pinch today of- the Like onions? You can h:\rvp.st " ^ — ' .hem from jour home garden from I nationwide steel strike. ,he time the ground tlinw.s out in Tlle P! i<*a>'d .Motor Car :he spring, until it. freezes in the Tnll, If you start the cycle by planting top seU.of Egyptian \vintcr onions, this fall; All onions like cool weather, but this Is the only one that can be'de- pended upon to. live through sub-, zero temperatures, and start growing with the earliest spring tlinws. The "top sete" are produced by the;—*""—" ~' *" •*•••-•.•... -.— ... 0 ~, onion plant, as a cluster of niinia- rea< *>' rallscd b - v the ' steel 5irike ' turc onions at the top of a se?d The automotive shutdowr .stnlk. Planted just like the onion sets we buy in the sprnlg. they will | produce gi-ccii onions in time to enjoy before you can even spade the garden for other crops. A clump-of Egyptian onions will grow as large as a fool in tUameier; and If part of it Is harvested each spririg.-it will produce top sets, and provide spring onions for the table, for many years. These ''top sets'" gave early gardeners the idea for ''bottom sets." which are srown from seed, , dwarfed by crowding and planted the following spring for a speedier harvest than can be grown from seed. The Packard Motor Car Co. yesterday laid bit 1,85 ot Us 12,413 em- ployes until Monday. The Briggs Manufacturing Co., which supplies,' bodies for- Packard, laid off 5,003, employes at ita Conner plant'for the rest.of the week. Both companies said operations would' resume Monday but on a re| duced schedule. Packard said- its ! shutdown is to balance shortages al-- brought to about 25.0CO the number of workers idled in llie Detroit area as result of ihe slceV sirikc. The strike idled 10,300 steel workers at Great Lakes Stcl and 2,000 others in five small steel plants here. home remedy to relievo inherits of child's cold • ,RUS ON EGG MAKING KAURI/US FORM UTRA EGGS Gi»» your hen> a joying boost with "top IMdins" O f Layino Checlon. You'll find .it uiualty steps up production and holds .-' ----- "P production and holds _ o»i a long peiiod of Um«. Aboul 3 Po«nd» (2 rjuar!«) doily of noon and mor« lull bcfor* roosting. Corns in — let u « •how you how "top feeding" of Loyena Checker! over maintenance requirements •uppljei lh« »flj-n\alr.ing materials ( or up .to 20 ««tia »BOI per day from 100 hens. 4493--TeIeph one—4493 L. K:Ashcraft THE LEACHVILLE BRANCH of Russell Phillips Tractor Go. Formally 'opening Saturdiiy morning,' the I-cnchville Hranch nf IliisHcII'I'hillips Traclnj- Co. offers In fanners in this region efisy access lo Ford 'I'mctors and De'arhorn J-'arm Kcjuipmcnt. Mr. J. A. Davis, who has been associated wilh (lie lilylhcville company for Hie past (wo years, is (he able manager of Uiis new l.caclivillc branch. You're invited lu slop in and gel acquainted. FARM EQUIPMENT Russell Phillips Tractor Go. LEACHVILLE, ARK,

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