Iola Daily Register And Evening News from Iola, Kansas on November 8, 1907 · Page 6
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Iola Daily Register And Evening News from Iola, Kansas · Page 6

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Iola, Kansas
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Friday, November 8, 1907
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Page 6
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6 THIS tSSTRAIieE BUT TflUE PBESCRlFTIOX HUIXS THE SALE OF PITEHT XEDIC1>'E HEKE. DireeUong for Xixin'i; at Homo Msfce tbe KldneyH Act and UVrr- come Rhenmntl!)!!!. DRA66ED FIVE liLfS •1 To make up enough of tlio "Dande- llqn tceatineut," which Is clainind to be relieving uearly every Kufferer who uses Itlor backache, kidney complaint sore, weak bladder and rliemnatisni: Ret from any prescription pharmacy one-half ounce Kluld lixlract Dandelion, one ounce Comiifumd KarKon and three OUIICOH Compound Syrup of Sarsaparllla. .Shake well in a hotlle and talie In (leaspoonful doscB afior each meal and a^ain at bedtime. Those who have trii'd it claim thai it acts Bcntly but thori)tiKliIV <in llic kidneys, relievlUK backache and bladder ti^juble and urinary difficulties almost instantly. Many ca.ses of rbi-u- m'atism are known to have in-en relieved within^ ffw days, the pain and swelUug diniinfshlns with each do.'-e. A well-known Ioc;iI ilriigjjist. who Is in a position to know, a.sserls that this prescripliou. wlitN'ever it becomes ' known,-always ruins the sale o^ tin- numerous patent nieilieiup iheiinn- tlsra cures, kidney cures, etc. l! is :i _ recipe which the ninjoriiy of piUeijt " medicine inhnufactiirers. and even certain physicians dIsHki' to se'- published.. Few eases, indeed, wliirli ivill fail to fully yield in its pe-'uliarlv soofhing and liealinfi iiilluenei'. lleiiij; "coniiio.sed of eouiniou every-day inure- dients. which <'an 1 M > liad from atiy druggist, it makes up a ::niid. h <iui -si and] harmless remedy and al niimiiial cos Harry Thompson's Dog Eactlped From Buggy.—Dragged by Rope. Wfith a rope about its neck just long enough to allow his two feet to touch the ground, a bull dog belonging to Harry Thompson, the lola real ?Btaii« man. was dragged a distance of tlve miles behind a wagon and yet lives. The ineiilent is a remarkable one and Mr. Thompson has doelrted that ho has a remarkable dop. Mr. Thompson started !n company with a friend ffom XooKhi) Kails tc» Tola. The bull dog was ilrd to the scat to keej) bim from Kcttlng away. The dog evidently grew tired of rilling and jinnped out. Mr. Thompson was driving at a lively gait when a passln.e; fanner asked him If hf was tryincr to hang the dog. He 'r.okod around and there was the bull d)K. jimipinp along the ground on his hind f.?et. touch 'ug only the high places. But for the fact that the farmer called his attenr :nn to the dog's (•"nditiou. Jlr. Thompson would probably Iiave driven into town dragging a dead dou. as the animal could not possibly have lived if it had been forced to make ihe trip to town. This HKuning as ;i result of Its ax- lierience. Ihe do.s 's so stiff that it is liaroly able to wa'k. IVIISUNDERSTOOD SPECIFICATIONS Contractor Rutledqe Gave up Contract for Brick Walks. PAUL REVERES RIDE. Famous Incident of Revolutionary War at Crescent. 'Paul Hi 'ViTe 's rid"' is om- <if tin" new films rec.-'ived by the ("reM-; nt theatre ctmipanv. \vlii<-h will be nin this week. Tli» i)icture is a r.-pni- ductlon of llu't .ii;n <His ni.dniclii rMi- of Revolutionary times and lias in-nv- en a iMii 'tila- r-'-rliirr- vb.r.-v.r i- lias besn shown. TV.- reel is (:•<•• In k'Uglh. Uecause he misunderstood wliat kind <if bricks tlie spedlications called for Couir.ictor Rui;edge last niuht secured the c<uisent of tli;* councU to ;::ve up the rontraet for laying cer- i tain brick sidewalks. Mr. Kutledse il'.MiL'lit that coinn;<)ii brick was ask; I.I lor in the spedlications while as a jiiijii;.!- iif fact i)avei-s or corrugated \'t\:i-\ WHS called for. .Mr. Uutledg,^ ap- i iMM!-..,! ii.'fiire ih<" council and explain- e! t]i.' uiatler .-iiid his ropiest, to give M|i ilie eoiitrarl was gi.iJItt'd. Copyright 1907 hf Hcrt "Schaffher £sf Marx in this town has a reasonable doubt that STEIN BLOCH and HART, SHAFFNER & MARX Clothes will not better his looks, we are ready for that man. In STEIN BLOCH and HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX Clothes we have a good thing for you, and we want it believed. These clothes are so well made and are full of so much style f^at they will make an instant impression on any man. Wc want the doubter. Suits $12.50 to $25. Overcoats $10 to $35. Florsheim and Nettleton Shoes For Men. $4 to $6 Knox, John B. Stetson, Imperial and Donble Star Hats, at $3 to $3 PUTS800 IN FIRE HOSE ( ilj l..|> Big Contract at Last Xlgbfs .MiMlinir, College Styles— snap and dash—shape, comfort and service. Models and fabrics exclusive. A "different" kind of clothes that will give you a "nifty" appearance. Till' eii> lirt' ileparlnicnt will .soon have St.H) feet iif new lin?c. At the iiieeiiim of the council la.-^t night the ;<-iiy crmtraeti'd for this amount of 'iK.'se from Ihe Kuieka Hose cnmpan.'. I of .N'ew .iersoy. The hmne is to co.st ]fit ;li(y and ninety cents per foot. 'I'lie ' total aiiiount of the contract is $.sOi). PRICE OF HORSES HIGHER. Made by Leopold. Soiouion Etsendtath, Chicago. Sold In one yxo- "pressive dealer in most e\ery lity. 'Sou'll tinJ K well worth your while to looit lii.ii up. I Sale Yesterday Proveo Increased Marj kel Prices. I Tliai the pi ice of lioives is .iway I was priveii >ei -terrlay at tin- sale I oi' Mr. Shb 'lob 'iti. a lesidi-iit of the I llurville place north of town. Due of lilie ordlaaiT farm bo '-si'S. si.\ years ' or ai;e and wetJhinn I.IDO ininnds. was bid In al $l.*i."> cash. A few years ago the same boise woii'd liave I ii hard i to i^'W at $75 or $li'('. % Consumption's record in New York City alone: 40,000 sufferers; 10,000 deaths every year—200 weekly—28 daily— one every hour. Scott's Emufs/on has cured more coughs and colds and prevented more consumption than any other preparation in the world. AUdnissbtst BOe.»ad$\M. WAS ONLY VISITING Conlcntliin Said to of Vona I'owi'll Who Ila^c Itun Away From Home. Is Embroidery Sakl Tuesday morning we will have 4000 yards of beautiful embroidery bands and flouncings to offer at about % the original price. This hne of embroideries was bought long ago but owing to the slow delivery we will have to clean them up at a big sacrifice in pric 3. You can buy fine swiss bands that ought to sell at 65c a yard for 39c a yard, and fiouncings that sell as high as $1.50 for 79c. See north window display. Lot 1 Rich embroidery insertion bands in open and shaddow patterns. \'al- ues up to <>5c, on Pale for Lot. 2 Swiss Insertion bands and 11-inch flouncings in open and shadow patterns. Values up to '.>5c, on sale for 49o KEIM CASE CONTINUED. Assault Casr Will be Tried in Justice Potter's Court in 15 Days. i .;is: I'veniiif; Ollicer Win. 'I'odd was down to tiie Santa l "e depot when the Oil J"'Iyer came in. He noticed that a yonoK miss well attired and with a rather |)retty face and flKurc allRhted frotn Ihe train. Other than these casual observations the ofllcer Rave the dashing school ;;lrl no further notice for Ihe time. Abont nine o 'clock a long distance call ctiiue In from Cherryvalo from an anxious and excited father who said tliat his diiUKhter. AIlss Vona Powell, had ritti away from home and he tiKUiKht she had eoine to lola. He gave a description of his roving spirited offspring aiul also told the ofllcers wlieie they might find her if she was in this city. W'lien given tlie description Jlr. Todd believed at once that the girl wh^f came in on the Hyer was the runaway. He immediately got busy on the case. I iOariy this morning he learned that Ihe girl was at 614 North I'Trst street visiting with a girl friend. Miss Keith. The officer went in search of her and found that he runaway had accom­ panied her friend to the high school. An hour later the girl was in the custody of the officer. She said she had not run off but had merely come here to vi.sit her friend. Her father will come either this afternoon or this evening and taxe her notue. A giri by the name of Grace Hunt was supposed to have accompanied Miss Powell hero but she could not be found and it is tlioitght she did not come to tola at all. WTien you are sick, out of sorts, take Holllster'a Rocky Mountain Tea. The most effective remedy. Relieves when others fail. You he the judge, try it. nr. cents. Tea or Tablets, ul nnrrell's Drug Store. EAST lOLA REVIVALS ENTHUSING Till.- <-as,« of the State vs. .1. C. ?Ceira wbii-h wavi to be tiled in .lusi.ico Potter's coiirr tills morning wa.s crintln- ued fifl'.'eii days from date. .7. C. Keiin is charged with assaulting E. O. rjruuir of this city with a deadly weai 'Kii;. ft will be remembered that Bruner and Keim foii.irht at the lola Electric {lailway depot at Lallarpe sev^'ral weeks ago. Meetings Increasing in Power Each Evening. The meetings at tlie East lo'a M«tli odist church are increasing in interest and power every night. The pastor. Ucv. Harkness. Informs us that it is the most deep and solid revivla work that he has witnessed for years, and he believes it largely comes from the deep and solid preaching of Rev. Perry. No sensational methods have been used-and only the old time re. ligion presented. THRRE ASK FOR PAROLE. IVIcn Servina Time for Violation of the Prohibitory Law Would be Released. Bill Bailey. .lini Coru and Claude Lewis, all serving time in the county jail for violation of the prohibitory law, asked the county commissioners for a pande. The commissioners had not acted on the r;'quests at tliree o'clock. Bailey and Com are Himi- bo'idl nx-n. Lewis is an lola man. HAS SPECIAL FEATURES Lot 3 21 to 27 inch Swiss embroidery flouncings in scroll, open faud shadow de- fi'.gns. The most beantiful paMe-ns 3'ou could imagine. Values up to fl.RO, on sale for UaniJ) IM.\lc MlustreN Introdnrc .Some Snell \rlMt.. Sonif of the .specially cugaseil features ill the olio with the Dandy Di.vie MiUBlrels which comes to the Crand Saturday afternoon and night. Include The Cotton Pickers' Hand of match-' less miislcltins, .lames Crosby, the tall talker: Williams & Stevens, comic Inipersoiiatoi-s: Montrose Oouslas. trick cyclist: Oenny .lones, the Texas teaser; Sam Davis, tlw greatest colored baritone: H. S. Wooten. an Indian Territory tenor, and the Okla- hi I octette of unrivalled vocalists. The perforiiiaiue begins with a first part In the "Uoyal Palm Grotto" and eonclndes with a screamingly funny farce "A Fowl Deed." in which Charles Williams Interprets the leading rolfe. Among the delightful features of this merry and magnlllcent mipstrels Is the song features. which abounds throughout the |)rogramme, - all the IKipular songs of the day such as "Bill SInmionds.' "In the Valley of the San .loaqiiln." •.luat a Bunch of W1W Flowers." •'When Your Clothes Wear Onl." ".lust Help Yourself," "Ain't Going to be no RIne." "The Songa My Mother I'sed to Sing," "Mov Ing Day." the sweet old-time southern melodies and the poijular class songs of Yale. Colunibla. Harvard. Cornell, WJllIauis, Princeton, Georgetown and ITuiversity of Virginia. Women Avoid Operations .ROSE^MOORS When a woman sufferiDg frojpa female trouble is told that an oper- 'ation is necessary, it, of coarse, frightens her. The very thonght of the hospital, the operating' table and the imifa strikes terror to her heart. It ia quite true that these troubles may Peach a stage •where an operation is the only resource, but a great many women have been eared by Lydia E. Pinkham's VegeUble Compound after an operation has been decided npon as the only cnre. The strongest and most grateful statements possible to make come from women who by taking Lydia E. Pinkhani's Vegetable Compound made from native roots and berba, have escaped aerioua operstionsyAs evidenced by Miss Rose Moore's case, of 307 W. 36th St. N.Y. She writes:- Dcar Mrs. Pinkham:-" Lydia £. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound has cured me of the Tcry worst form of female trouble and I wish to express to you my deepest gratitude. I snilered intensely for two yean so that I was unable to attend to my duties and was a burden to my family. I doctored and doctored with only temporary relief and constantly objaeUof to an operation which I was advised to undergo. I decided to tiy Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound; it cured ma of the terrible trouble and I am now in better health than I have been for many years.** This and other such cases should encourage every woman to try Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound before Sxn submits toinopezmtion.' Mrs. FHnkham's Standing: Invitation to Women suffering from any form of female weakness are InTitcd to promptly communicate with lifrs. Pinkham, at Lynn, Mass. From the symptoms given, the trouble may be located and the qniekest and surest way of recovery advised. MAY LEAD TO CAHCER YOr>« GIRL .lSS.4UL'rED. Bloodboonds Will Be Sent to ticene of Crinip In 8«|inlpa. Sapiilpa, I. T., Nor. 8.— KaUe Keae-> clar, a yoimg white girl living two ntilett.from Bapulpa vas isrlmiiially as* saulted nbottt mlqnlifbt BhtitnMtfnmi In », siriag ^onditio^ rnwrtv to ' There Is no difference, at first, in the appeaxaace of a ca^eenms and • common ulcer, and for this reason every sore^that is o^stiaate or slow in healing should excite stt.<>picion. for the sore is nothtnK B><»^ 13ua the external evidence of a polluted blood, and if allowed to zonaia aiay^d^enerate into Cancer. . Efforts to heal the nicer by means of salves, plasfaasiuqd other external remediesalways result in failttre^becanaesnchtfrahacat can have no possible effect on the blood, where the deadly geiiiis sad atorkid nutter , form, and are carried through the circnlation to'the alace. . No ioce or idcer can exist without a predisposing internal canse, ana the open, diachargiaif. nicer or festering old sore will continue to eat deeper into tbisahoaiadiag flesh as long as a polluted, getm-infected circnIiUian-diaduncs its impur- itied into it S. S. S. goes to the fonattin-ltead«f thettJ^Blu^'aad dmes out the germ-producing .poisons and motbld iapsiitlM; iriiich ke» the nicer open. TlKaasihisxidmiatiiUdNood nally leav ^"^\fiS^^^pp &llc»li f

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