The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on September 22, 1949 · Page 14
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 14

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Thursday, September 22, 1949
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Page 14
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PAGE TWELVE BIA'THEVILLR (ARK.) COURIER NEWS THI NATION TODAY Unpopularity of British Pound In Foreign Markets Forced Price Cut to Get World Trade ' : \ ;;j By Sterling F. Cirten «i (Por James Mai-low > : :! WASHINGTON, Sept. 22. (AP)—The Hrilish pound ttecame really unpopular in world trade circles hist spring:. ~ f . Anybody who got hold of dollars couldn't cliiinsje them into pounds without losing some of his buying pov.XT. He naturally insisted on getting move pounds for his money. Senate to Probe Food Price Gap High Costs But Low Income for Farmer Poses Big Question WASHINGTON, sept. 22, CAP)Why i!o you have to pay higher prices while thn fanner geU less money? Tluu's Ihc riucstloii a Senate Agriculture Subcommittee, wants ans- With the Courts Chancery: Nola Nora Jackson vs. !.;irry Kaymon Jackson, suit for divorce. Martha King vs. Marcus Kins. .suit for divorce. Thomas M. Jolley vs. Irma Jolley. suit for divorce, Arthur Graves vs. Alberta Graves, suit for divorce. VliKinln Bmm vs. Shannon THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1949 Bimn, suit for <ti.- . Vonccil Bowers Kleins by her next friend, J. X. Uoweivs, lier fatli- er, vs. Jarucs Monroe KlfjKlns, suit for divorce. Hilda Dlllard vs. Jack Dlilaril, suit for divorce. Lillian Menyman >• Horace Mcrryman, Mill for divorce. Mary Hillhou.su vs. Hubert Hillhouse, suit for divorce. Dixie O Morris vs. Dula Morris, suit for divorce. \ K. E. Elam vs. Llz/ie and E. My- ! rlc. injunction to allow plaintiff nse of road near Island 36 to gel. out crops. A map of the Nile valley for tax purposes was made as early as Hie 13th century B.C. On a pipe organ, the short pipes produce the hi&h notes. Citing your money's worth 9 Isn't pound a pound, no matter what you • paid for it? J.'The over-simplified answer is a pound was no- a pound. The British set up rules. .'.A traveler wlio entered England could bring with him only pocket, money In pounds. If you, an American, got pounds by selling shares of English stock, you could spend them only for other shares of {lock—not for goods. Kngland wanted dollars for her goods. : -;Anri if you \vere, say, a South American who solci coffee to Eng- Snd, you really didn't gel pounds in your hands, you got a credit entry in a bank in London. You Chilli spend it in England, if Eiig- , Und had anything you wanted to i to biiy. but you couldn't get hold of i be kels." Some English new.sji.ipers thought he should have done that, nicy feel tile cut was needlessly deep. Tho which Cripp.-v' .iji.svver would bP: When a money slnrl.s fjilliu^, you can't foresee (he end. Fiance is letting her money "float" to whatever rate the Paris free markets sets. But France knows that (he franc already is close to tho fie,- market vat". Gillette, chairman of Ihc subcommittee, added that there are "repealed reports that the acquisition of .Independent food prickers and processors by national units has-resulted in holier prices to the consumer and lower prices to the farmer." Consumer? are asking the committee numy questions, Gillette saltl These include: "Why bread cost.- flic same al- Britain on the oilier hand, is in tIloUKh vvhoat „,.,,.„ .„.„ r| 31 louWc: People would tend to wait ]m . m| , aml „, , or till the pound hit bottom. The shear of pound notes and go trade them for dollars, , j \[ Foreign Trade Sought •'When—despite all the rules and mil the dollar loans and all the t l the dollar oans and all the isis talks—it appeared that Britain /seed a foreign trade collapse, jpmething had to be done. ^Britain must trade. She cannot flairvive without imports. It is a pinin matter of food and clothing- for Englishmen, without regard for yprnvtrjng Britain's once-proud (Jace in world commerce. »So the decision was ready made. JThe pound had to be fixed at real TOlue. In recent weeks and montiis. tjie urgency, has heightened Por- cfcners felt devaluation coming. Jn- flead of buying from Britain they would wait until it came. Then British i good* would be cheaper. Iforeign orders became smaller and ' Karcer. 9 Final)}', last Sunday. Sir Stafford £rippfi made his announcement, of Devaluation from the rate of H.0:l * pound to 12.80. Other overvalued jjurrencies around the world fell like a row of dominoes. iger they walled, the farther \vn woultl go the pound. British .Must Double IAp,,rls The pound now seems low enouph - insure that money-value won't an obstacle to Britons selling Roods abroad, whatever other ob- stncles may remain, if the rate does prove too low, sterling cnn be revalued upward. Britain had anotlinr choice. She could have sol a rale something nearer whnt people expected, like $3.20. Cripps evidently decided that would not be enough to gel I lie desired results, in fixitis his rale he asked his experts such cnU'Mious as the.se-T Since Britain now must sell four Mlrs of gloves lo gel the same number of dollars she used to get for three pairs, will she earn more more dollars in Uie long run? And. since Ihe materials Brilaiu buys will go up in price as much as her export goods go down in price, can she prevent further inflation? Evidently Sir Stafford's experts answered yes to both questions. But ] mem it is a risk. Some experts say 3 staff ,,,, country which tries a one-third I Ark. Mr. "Why inilV: retails for 21 1-2 and 22 cents a quart \vhilc the farmer receives nulv ej'.'ht cenls. "Why it costs TO c.crH.s a d<i7en to clistribule epp.s from the farmer to the consumer." devaluation must double its exports. To: Insurance Firm Names Manager for BlytheYtlle Appoint rnrtit of T. A. Fotaer ns niahsifjpr nf the Hlvlhf-viHe tiistrirt (if IJfe Insurnjifie Company of OcorRia was nntintinrod tnday by H. C. Jackson, vice pipsitlctit and .siippriiilpudpjU of Apoiirios. at the home office of the company in Atlanta. Mr. FolEp.r will fitlnul' a three- day conference on nerncy tnanngn- inenl to be roiuhirtrtt hy his com- nruiy in Liulp Rock September 2T- 2E). The "\ev nuxunarr bpratnc RRSO- dated with Life of Georgia in October. 19Ih, as an nEont at Mobile. Ala. Prior to his recent appoint- Hlytheville he served as nmmei'r at Wc.sl MemptiLs. r is marrLpd to the as the Harvest Moon ATTENTION LADIES We have fur *al« now: Darwin Tulipn In 7 different cobra Narcissus— Yellow >n d White Daffodils—Kin* Alfred and Golden Harvest GaUlilhus Snow Uroiw Scllla—Campanula la. Crociu Chlonod«xa Liiclllae Hyaclnthi In different colon These are the eholcett of bulba—Imported direct U M fr*B Holland. ' (•nine In and make leur M/ectlont HOW while w» have eom- jilele slock. PAUL BYRUM Hardware ft Seed 111 Eait Main Street BlythertUe, Arkan g Now Britain still had some choice. .At any else the gamble won't pay off. With the help promised last week by the united, stales and Canada, j Tuesday * ^ ~" rmor Miss Fiennice Joan qncz of St. Louis. Mo The Little Rock conference opens .Seiit.^mbef 2. with ten "'' Yes, SURE 01 Ihe Horvest Moon risei in radiant beauty every year.., that's how SURE you are of Ihe year-in-year-out perfection of 7 Crown ...Seagram's [ioest American whiskay. ™ 1 ! 7 Ciown. Blended Whiskey. 86.8 Proof. G5'/, Grain Neuiul Spirits. Seagram-Distillers Corporation, Chrysltl Buildins. Ne* Vork LOCAt DEUVERED PRICES ng, f«sh-lined M ATCHED ajjitinst the field, those figures make news. Matched against what they cover —they're an urgent hint (or instant action. Because that sum puts in your garugc— STVI.R that's as fresh as a Ucw-liulcn daisy, from those brand-new non-locking bumpcr-gimrU grilles to the Jouble-hull's-eyc lailli^ht. 1 ;. SIZE thal's mighty handy in trnllic, a real relief in modesl-si/,e garages, a wonderful aid in parking. ROOM that rates right up al the top—with inches •dded to nil rcnr seat cushions, a full foot more hiproom in -<-door Sedans. POWER that is lively, frugal, ever-thrilling because it comes from a high-compression, high-pressure Fireball straight-eight. A Rll)K we'll pul against nni (hing else you can find, regardless of price—soft, pillowy, gentle. \\'e eiill it matchless beciuise we think you will too. IIAMH.I.NX;? \\'ell, this price is Itie price on n !!uick »Sl'Kf:iAI. will) lingct-llick Synchro-Mesh transmission—as light -,uul easy as you'll litul on any non-aulomatic-drivc car. Hut a few more dollars per month will also give ynu the silken luxury of Dynallow Drive—the sofl, easy, reslful drive the very biggest litiicks boast. l-'igtire it out. Check things up. Look this piciure over, then— t»o learn more from your Huick dealer. Sure as sunrise, >ou'll mnlcc tip y<mr uiitid to LANGSTON-AAcWATERS BUICK Co. r-r a*itn*»hil f » *r f ttnill III 11 k irill lutiltl (hrm WALNUT & fiROAIMVAV TKl.KPHONE 5S5 WHEN You Go To THE HOSPITAL O WHO WILL PAY THE BILLS f Ouf nc* comprehensive policy covers hospital confirK- ment resulting from either accident or sickness, in recognized hospitals tnyvAtere in rh« United States or Canada . . . «od can be written to cover YOU and YOUR ENTIRE FAMILY. Hospilaliration is an expensive experience—you owe it toyo-^self to investigate our HOSPITAL PREPAREDNESS PLAN . . . find out Sow muck it does and Sow litfl* it costs! Our Insurance Department now offers one of the must complete policies written today, al a moderate cost. Farmers Bank & Trust Co. INSURANCE DEPARTMENT I'hone 3121 DEFOLIATE .. by AIRPLANE I'etfetl coverage. Defoliant available at compelitive prites. SCRAPE AGRICULTURAL SERVICE '> Miles South of Blyfheville Phone 43SS Huffman's Prediction's Come In and Sec Our Entertainer She Reads Your Past, Present and Future Come in and ask for a FREE HEADING. . .. Sept. 26 through 29th. EAGLE BEAUTY SCHOOL Second & Walnut OUR NEW TELEPHONE Nunn Provision Co. SHEET METAL WORK. OF ALL KINDS Custom work tor gins, alfalfa mills, oi) mills. Custom ^hearing up lo \/4 inch thirknea* Frank Simmons Tin Shop 117 South Broadway Phon< . 26S , TRY NU-WA LAUNDRY-CLEANERS

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