Iola Daily Register And Evening News from Iola, Kansas on November 2, 1908 · Page 4
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Iola Daily Register And Evening News from Iola, Kansas · Page 4

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Iola, Kansas
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Monday, November 2, 1908
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Page 4
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lie lOU DiUT lEOSTEl CHiSi F. scon; /• Bntored at lola, Kansas, Fo8tofflc»« u Second-CIau Matter. 4itcrtitl ]is Bates Made Knovm on Application. SUBSCBIPTIOir BATES. h n fMur In lom, Gas City, LaB7*a- Tllle or LaUarpe. >na Week 10 cents 3f Month 44 cents Ona Year 15.00 BrHalL Oar year Inside eoanty 9!M l^a« year ontslde conaty 9LO0 fhree Months, ID advance $1.00 One Month, In advance 44 tfl'lCUL PIPEB, cm OF BIS. SKT^ Tclcphoiet Bnalness Office 18 Bditorial Room 2l'2 TEE lOLA DAILY BE6BSTEB. MOlfBAY ITiyPg, yPTEMBBB 8.19^ KlPLBLIiAA TKKET. Fur ITcoideut of-4ljo United Stales WILLIAM H. TAFT of Ohio. For Vioc PrcsiUciil JAMES S. SHERMAN 6t New York. STATE TICKET. For Governor W\ It. STUBBS ( of Lawrence. For Lieutenant Governor W. J. FITZGERALD or Dodge City. For Secretary of State ClIAS. E. DENTON of Allica. For Auditor JAMES M. NATION of Eric. For Treasurer MARK TL'LLV of .Independence. For Attorney General .F. S. JACKSON 1 of Eureka. For Superintendent Public lustructloD E. T. FAIRCHILD of Ellswortli. For Superintendent Insurance C. W. DARNES Osasc City. For Slate Printer T. A. McNEAL of Topcka. For R. R. Coiunilsbiouera GEO. AY. K.\NAYEL F. J. RYAN C. A. RYKER. For United Stales Senator J. L. IlRfSTOW of Snliua. For Cougretsuian CHAS. F. SCOTT of lOla. For Judge Thirly-scveutli District OSCAR TOUST Of Tola. I'\)r State Senator I'TtANK TRAVIS of lola. COU?{TY TICKET. For Representative W. T. WATSON For County Clerk It. E. CULHEilTSON. For Treasurer C. C. AUSHERMAN. For Resister of Deeds R. L. THOMPSON. For County Attorney H. A. EWING. For Probate Judge J. D. SMITH. For Sheriff C. 0. BOLLINGER. For Superintendent of ScUoolfc MRS. MAUDE ITJNSTON. For Surveyor H. F. PALSTRING. For Clerk of Court C. E. ADAMS. For Coroner R. O. CHRISTIA.V. For Commissioner. Second District, T. J. ANDERSON. For Commissioner. Third District C. A. FUONIC For Justice lola T'vp. C. S. POTTER. J. I'. DUNCAN. \V. J. CONLEV. For Constable lola Twj). T. S. BALL. jnmf%I^WisI^SlJlim^^ ooooooooooooooooo Washington, Oct 31.—The Prcsidtnt today Issued the annual Thanksgtrins proclamation, in which he pointed out the steady growth of the nation In strength, xvorldly power, wealth and population and that oiir avprage of individual comfort and w^ell being Is higher than that of any other country In the world. For this, he declare.';. Americans owje it to the Almighty to show equal progress, in moral and spiritual things. The proclamation follows: Once again the season is ar^and. when, according to the ancient custom of our peop!el it becomes the duty of the President to appoint a day of prayer and of thanksgiving to Cod. Year by year this nation grows in strengih and worldly power. Duriua: the century and a quarter that has elapsed since our entry info jjie circle of independent people we have O O o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o PBESIDEXT PBOCIADIS DAY OF THAXESGITIXO. grown ai)(} prospered iu material things to a degree never kuown before and not now known iu any oiher country. Tlie Thirteen colonic lantic were beninied THE TRICK WILL FAIL Bulletin From Wiiite House Says An Agreement Between Rockefeller and Democrats is Suspected. Washington. Oct. ul.—Tiie second statement regarding tlie ' announce ment of Roclicfeller'o preference for Taft issued frow tlu' white liouoc to day, says in plart: "President Roosevelt has received numerous letters and telegrams showing the trick of Rockefeller doubtleKs made by an agreement with the Democratic party, will fail absolufjly." TO JURY NEXT WEEK Beth Defence and Frosecutiva Has Bested in the Morse Case. New York, Oct. 31.—Both the prose cotion and defense in the trial of C. W. Morse and A. H. Curtis who are charged with the violation of ftsderal banking laws, rested their case early this afternoon and the court adjourned until Monday when the concluding arguments will be made. Tlite should place the case in the jury's hands by Monday night. o o o c o o o o o o o o o © o o o o o o 0 o o o o which struggled along the seacoiisl of the Atin. but a few miles west of tidewater, by the Indian haunted wilderness, have been transformed iuio the mightiest republic which the )vorld has ever seeu. Its domains stretch across (he continent from one to the other of the two greatest oceans and it exercises dominion alike in the arctic and tropic realms, llie growth in wealth, in] population has surpassed even the growth in territory. Nowhere else in the world is the average of Individual comfort and luaterlalj well being as high as in our fortunate land. For the very reason that in material w..in(ring we bavo thn« aljoundcd, wc owe Itjto the Almighty to show ecinal progress in moral and spiritual ihing.s. With a nation, as with Ibc indlvidnnis wUo make U|i a nalloii, material wcllbeing is an iudispcnsabie foundation. Hut tlie foundation avails nothing by ii -.:<!lf. That'life is wasted, and worse than wasted, which is spent in plUu^-. heap on h'-ap. tlioyc tilings which niinister merely Ui the pleasure «>f iJie Iiody and to ilic power that rcojta cuily on weaitli. Ujion material welllH -iu-; as a fonndaliOn utusi be raised the Sirnciurc «»r the lofty lire of the spirit, if tills nation ils properly to fulfill its great mission and to accomplish all that \yo. .so ardently hope and dc.Mie. The thincs of the things of the intullect better: but best of i(;soul: for in the nation, as in the individual, character lhat counts. Let ns. Iherefore. as a resoluteiy agaln .st evil, and wlib broad charity. Willi kindliness and jiood will toward all men. but with unflinching determination to sinilb down *rong...strive with all the strength that is given us for rightc<l »U3ueHS iu public and in private life. Now. therefore. IJ Theodore Roosevelt. Prcsldcut of tin- rnlted Slates, do set apart Thursday, the l-'Clh of November ncNt. as :i day of general Thank-sgiviugj and prayer, mid on that day I recommeiid the people shall cease froni their dally work, and in their homes or in their churches meet devoutly to thank the Almighty for the many and fcreat blessings they have received in the past-and pray that tlicy tnay be given .strength BO lo order their lives as to deserve a continuation of these blessings in the future. In witness whereof I have hereunto set mV hand and caused ibc of the Inited Stiites to be affixed. Uoue at the City of Wabhingfoii. this »hirt >-rii >t day of October, in the year of our I^rd one thousand, nine hundred and eight, and of the Indei)endence lof the United States, the one hundred and thirty-third. j O(Signed) liy the President: THEODORE ROOSEYELT. of the body are f;ood: all are the things of I in the long run it is people, set onr faces .VLVEY A. ADEE Acting Secretary of State. O O o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo TO PRESERVE tiEALTH President Itoo^crrlt Has Great ltcirum< mendution In >'t'.\t >^essa??e to CoDLTess. New York. Oct. :;i.—That l^rctideut Uoosevelt ha;-> a .i;r <.at ret^iuniendation to congress in liis next /message—the passage of a law to conserve tJic public healtii similar to the one proposed by the .\nicrican Medicjil Association .—was ihe slateuienl m'ade last night in an addres.s before the Nev.- York .\cadcniy of Medicine by Dr. Charles A. L. Reed of Clncinnati[ O.. chairman of the association's committee on national medical legislation. In speaking on the canipaigu 'for national health laws. Dr. Reed sjiid: •I am gratified io be ab'c lo assure you that the president has authorized .he hiaiemcnL that ho ^vill formulate dcfiniie proposals and ransmit them with his indorsement tOjthe next con- i?rcss. It now devolvcsj upon \he 13,- IK'O doctors iu the L'nited Slates not only to back the presideiiit in his work but to auticiuatc those actions by a persistent campaigii in behalf of this fuadaniental leature of ih -j public welfare. Speaking of the ]»o]iuiJcn of streams IJr. Reed referred to the Ohio watershed as a "thousand niiios of river rind a thousand inilts of typhoid.'" Over On.OOO persons die eevry year of cancer, he said, and the death rate from that cause is iucreasin^i by leaps nid iKjunds. i •If oiTiv oiie -i 'ia r of tile iicrsons who die or are in capacitated as the tesuli <jf tuberculosis jand typiiold f(?vcr v.cre saved, Di'. Uecd dojlared that it wonid mean a .••a 'ying In money urficicnt to maintain j a "natioimi board of health, i.ay for'llie army and navy, fortify our t^)asts.idii|ilicate our iiniamont on tlie ^*as. «ieepen our In- iernal waterways \ud i iu ten years would paj for tlie Panama canal and wipe out onr national debt." IS WORTH KNOWING SLIIPLK HECIPE PREVENTS SER lUlS KIDNEY TKOIBLE. Tells of n Spletulld lionie .Hade Hlx- lure for Backache and Urinary DJf- ficalties Which Anjoue I an Easily Prepare. OLD GOlilEN GOFF I E Smooth, rich, fragrjant— a happy surprise ^i' coHee bvers. A skilled and scientific Ueading elf "Old^ ^ ^ " Cotfees, with a^ pleasing indi- \ vidiu lity. 6 LD GOpEN is noi sold m bulk. but always comes to you in air- and moist- ure^prooE padcages—^your protectiMi. Askyoor grocer. TONE BROS., DM MOIRM, town. .More people .succuiiil) each .w.ar to some form of kidney trouble tlian any other cause. The slightest form of kidney derangement often develops into Brighfs kidney disease, diabetes or dropsy. When either of these dis- ea.ses are sus]>ected the sufferer .•^hould at once seek the best medical attention possible. Consult only a ^ood. first class jdiyslcian. There are many of tlie lesser symptoms of kidney trouble which '-ji: !)e treated at home is stated by a well- known authoril.v. For soiuc of these, such as backuclie. pain in the region of the kidneys, weak bladder, frequency, (especially at night) painful scald ing and other urinary troubles, try the following simple Itoine remedy: Fluid Extract - Dandelion, one-half ounce: Compound Kargon. one ounce: Compound Synip Sarsaparilla. three onuceSi lliese simple ingredients are harmless and cau be obtained at any go«jd .prescription phariiia;'y and any one can mix llicni by shaking well in a bottle. The dose for adults is a tea- siMKitiful after each meal and again a' bedtime. There is no more effective remfd> known to relieve all forms of rhentna- lisni. because it acts directly upon the kidneys and blood. It cleans the ci'-'i;- gcd up pores in the kidneys so tiny can filter and strain from the blood the poisonous uric acid and waste matter whicii if not eliininated remain in the blood, dccomiiose and settle about th(- joints and mnsciilar tissues causing the umold sufferiihg and deformity^of rheumatism. Itackache is nature'i?-signal uotify- ing the sufferer that the kidneys an; not acting properly. "Take care of your kidneys." is iiov,- ilie pliysicians advice to his patient.^. ARE FOR TAFT. Union Men are Doing Thinking. Their Own ^Yashln^ton. D. C. .Nov. 1.—In t!ie opinion of James 1.^ Feeney, pre.iid«;iit of the Bookbinders* Union., orgjfeized labor favors the eloctioii of Taft. Mr. Feeney has visited various sections of the country during the campaign. For the past few weeks ho has been Plumping New York for Taft. He does not say that every union man will vote for Taft. but bis conclusions, based upon a careful study of the situation, is that union men are lieep- ing well Informed on political conditions and will vote according to their own convictions. "There Is not the least doubt in the mind of any fine who has mixed with the Kew Yorkers.*; said Mr. Feeney. "ttat Jlr. Taft will receive a majority- at{ the coming election equal to that given Roosevelt four years ago. Ourinjj my tour of New York I made an average of thre^ speeches a day. I worked in New Y^-rk City-as la nonpartisan, anil as a t/nion man working s The Register has just completed an arrangement which will be of special interest to 'T£^ Farmers By this special arrangement we arc enabled lo offer you The lola Daily Register for a year and the Journal of Agriculture for a year for $2.25 The Journal of Agriculture is a weekly publication and treats the following departments: Poultry and Bees Women's Page Livestock The ftairy I Farm and Field Crop Pests and Diseases Fruit and Garden The regular price of The Journal of Agriculture is 50c a year, but by this special arrangement we are enabled to offer you The lola Register $2.00 Journal of Agriculture .50 for $2.25 $2.50 Address aii orders and make all money payable to Tlie Ida Daily Register 3 I ble Drubbing. —Score Was 98 to 0. for union principle.-. The • |»|%Jft Trail lA /nii were .sometimes mixed, but most of '|||j|| ^ | L AIVI Vf UN thf. audiences were composed of un-j ion men entirely. The attention giv-J en my af.:nmcnts firmly convinced me j Triplets Gave Independence ^ Terri- that the laborini? men of New York; are going to vote for Taft. The state-! nient tiiat the anti-injunction plaiik in; , ~ Ihe Bryan platform will <-au.-;e Ropub-i , „. . , , . . ;played at Electric park yitterday at- lican union men to desert tne party . „ . . ... - , ;t <-rnoon the Triplets hunibU-,1 a team and vote for Bryan i.s without founda-! , ' , , o: alleged foot oall plavfis Ironi In... ,• . «lependouce bv the score of !»8 to M. •bnion men are reading ti :e papers. _ ' , , . ., ;Tlie piavers from Indeiteiulence arriv- Thev have ceased to pennii others lo: , ', . , - ,. .. , r^, d- herf on the north bound Santa do their thinking lor them. They , 1 . • • ,'Fe and were taken to thi- grounds l<now what is going on in politics and ... . 1.1 1 • , .• 'Wliere the game wa.s called iirompilv will he guided bv their own feelings, ^ • » . and conscience. Xo power or pany ""^ a«lverti..ed. ean to.l;.y dietat.- to The union man'^''^"' "'^'^ what conr .se he mn.st pur.sie. .Ml ''''' '''"^ ^"'•^''"''-^ '''''' Kcpublican unioni.st.. and manv „f on. elassed in very particular, weight, til.- union men of other parties have^'he gan,.-. alr.ady mad- up their minds that: '"•«^'^*> .lodge TSft is the best man to elect ,o'""^ ^''"^i"^ '"='5 the Pie .Mdeiicv." ^P*"'- .\d.l Brennan. tlie base t.ali piteh<»r I'lLKS VVVEli IX fi TO II laV.S. j^'"' ''"-^ l^''''" drait.-?d by Kansas City POZO Of.\TME.\T is guaranteed to; of the .\mericau Assoeiaiion from the Aosocia seen on the local gridiron for several yeare. cure any case of it«liiii'.i. iilind. bleed ng or protruding [diet- in 0 lo 1! day^ -ir money refundeil. r .Oc. Springfield. Mo.. Western tion team, showed wonderful geueral- |.-hM> in running his »«ani. He work;<^.! till- forward pa.-s lor thirty, forty, .and fill, vard tains almost at will. Taft Carries It. .\ poll of the United Iron Work.s: , , , How-1 ^"""^ ^''""*" ^*o"derful 'control in tJuowing tlie ball that he akeii today jhows t! at Will^^im ard Taft of Ohio is safe .so far a.s the finindry is i'oncerned. H<- received -S votes against 11 for Bryan. has In throwing thf liorsehide. Street's lonu run wit!; the ball nnder I'is sweatt-r was the most comical stunt S.S.S. CONTAINS NO MERCURY Medicines containing Mercnrj* arc often given to persons suffering with Contagious Blood Poison, and so powerful is the action of this drug!tbat it frequently removes the symptoms' in a short while, and sCuts the disease up in the system to do greater damage to the delicate internal members. When, however, the treatment'^is left otf. the disease always return^ and the patient finds that his health has been injured by this powerful mineral, and he is often left with weak stomach, disturbed digestion, mercurial rheumatism, etc. The action of S. S. .S. is entirely different. It contains no ilercury, nor any other harmful drug, but is made entireh- of healing, cleansing roots and herbs. It cures Contagious Blood Poison by removing the \-irus from the blood. It searches out every particJe of the poison and does not leave the least ti^e for future ontbreaks. S. S. S.,- in addition to curing the disease, builds up and strengthens every part of the bod\'. Its fine tonic effects tone ub the stomach and digestion, improve the afipetite and regulate the entire system. Home treatment book contriiniag \-aInabIe information about the different stages of the disease and a|iy taedical advice desired sent free to all who write. ~ . > THB^WIFT. SPECIFIC CO., ATLAHTA, GA- 1 PUT IN NOVEL SHOW A Talking-Picture Show to be Located in lola by A. G. Reynolds of Omaha. .\. Ci. Keynokis of Oma..u wili imt ill a .amcraphone of talking-picture .sliow in. lola within the nest -week. The bhow i.s a new thing in this section, there being hut two west of Chicago, oiif at Kansas City and on-,at Omalia. Th' shoiv is what its name sug- ges.'.- A phonograph is operated' wiiii the moving pictures, making it po.ssilde to put on plays and minstrel sliow.-". The houses at Kansas City and Omaha have been putting on BLII llur and play.s of that character with H 'arkcd success. Mr. Reynold.s locates in lola largely through the influence of Lee .Mas- :?engale of ilie lola^ Electric. .Mr. Rejnolds knew .Mr. Masseugale wieii the latter lived in St. I^uis. Tlie Booster club has also given Mr. Rey- nold.s u hearty welcome. The show will be opened in about a week but the exact date has not been definitely decided upon. Mr. Reynolds has leased the. :Majeotic theatre as a location. The price.- the 10 cents for adu'ts and 5 cents for children. >Ir. Reynolds has beeu connectetl with the Union Pacific road for twenty years. MK. A>D MRS. .\JO.\MS RETIE?!. They .Vttendcd R. \. \. Banquet ui Chaiinte. Mr. and .Mis. U. W. Adams returned Saturday evening from a short visit Chanute. Thnrsday evening they attended a bantiuet in that city given by the R. X. A., auxiliary to the Modern Woodmen lodge. There were 3C5i visitors from the neighboring orders> in attendance at the banquet. The drill team of the Cherryvale order put] on the work after which the lolfk dril{. team gace an exhlUtion of teaxcj drills ^ Adrisses were inaae ;|^^ Distriet' ijep-j uty G- W, Adams wdL Dr. .Barker; head- fpliyslclan of this state.'.

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