Iola Daily Register And Evening News from Iola, Kansas on October 26, 1908 · Page 3
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

Iola Daily Register And Evening News from Iola, Kansas · Page 3

Publication:
Location:
Iola, Kansas
Issue Date:
Monday, October 26, 1908
Page:
Page 3
Start Free Trial
Cancel

ttDMENT B. PEA^K OrVES BEA. SONS iroB TJWINO FOB IT. T«Us of His ExietleBce hi 18»1<S Sesiilons. f / In 1890 I was eleAed by the good people of Allen county as their member in the house tjr '91. I knbw when I B£ked for the oftice the salary was Very meagre and fbund It truly so. Upon the assembling of the legislature I tried to find sonde place to sleep and board that would size down to the .pay. I say size down, because it was ino trouble to size iip. I found it simp- Jy _lmpos.'5lble to get a decent place io live^ for the pay resceived. . There was a good deal of inquiry among members as to how cheap we Could live. FiniUy Mr. York from Rollins county, says. "Boys I have It. JThere is a short; order restaurant flown on Kansas | avenue (giving the ,*ititober) where you can get three big ipAflcakes. butter ^nd molasses for ten idfeirts, and by eatikg a good bit of <5o- {lasSes you can get what will pass for / a iheal. I have tried it." \ I tried it myself, so I know. There .Ijvas another placcj farther down where . .a..good dinner was advertised for ten ./ cents, but oh my. Jone meal did you for ' 4fionth. I But you had to have some place to slMp. You could not get a room and b«a for les-s than! two doJians n week. Sofhe times Iwo memberfl would go to- gnther .fo make the expense less. Often members would go some place ^here tHey could get a dish of soup and .crackers for ten cents which if6\\\6 toe the wfclole mea'. because it W ^eli ^ap. rTberfe was a place near the corner tit NIfath street on the west side of Kansas avenue^ i But why should J teH bore of the straights (he members - n^ete. put to to come out even. Some Ad riot try it and of rourse went behind, hearly one one did. .Three dollars ^ a day might have doafe when Ranbas became a state, nfelirly titty yeari ago. Now the state rich' and ablel, and lo scrimp the who. who make her laws to three dollars a day and limit lo fifty days is iidt ,fair compensation for the work aitd expense incurred. I was always ilmre sixty days not counting the time going and coming. > -"WTifen it is considered that you must giVe-neaxly two I months to the cam- ptdg |n and the expense unavoidably in- fl^fred.-the $150 allowed dwindles out of sight but not out of mind. f ! A.ldrge majority of the men who fldinpofie (he )aw,-making power of the State are comparatively poor men, as a;.canvas of both the Douglass and DunBftiore houses showed in '93, to ascertain how maiiy must have help in order to stay in Topeka during the ''Lewelling war," until such times as (hey could draw (hPir pay from, (he state. The propofasd amendment lo (he constitution to pay each member $500 Is none too much, whether they sit 100 or 200 days, they do not get any more, and when the members know their pay is the same, however long or shon the slay there, they will not _ stay a day longer than is necessary. " I for one do not believe that the people of Kalnsas. when they understand It. want their law makers to serve tite state Without proper compensation. Another thing; adequate pay would ' do away with the excuses for the petty grafts that now iPi:;gvail when the legls lature i .s in session. Another thing is it would prevent to a great extent hasty legislation, which is often bad legislation, giving more time for the prop er consideration of measures before it. I myself have voted at one time on all the way from five to twenty hills, done because the time for adjournment was so short they could not be * voted .on separatply as the constitution requires. The thing for the people of Kansas who believe in fair pay should vote for the ^proposed amendment. It Is humiliating to write some of the things I have written, but everything set down here Is the truth, and paore could be added. How they hold one representaUve for subscriptions to everything (hat is going and besides looking after things that a member has to do while not In session. Re.spectfully to the people of Kansas, L. B. PEARSON, Humboldt. Ka «5.. Oct. 23, 1908. CURES ETSBTBODT SHOULD KXOW : THIS PBESCBIPTION. Xakes Bhenmatlsm Tanisli, Also Aetk Promptly on th« Kidneys and Blad* der and Easily Made by Anyone. Cut (his out and put In some safe place, for it is valuable and worth more than anything else In the world if you should have an attack of rheu(- raatism or bladder trouble or any derangement of the kIdneyH whatever. ' The prescription is simple and can be made up by anyone at home. The Ingredients can be had at any good prescription pharmacy and all that Is necessary is to shake them well in a bottle. Here it Is: Fluid extract dandelion, one-halt ounce; compound Ka.rgoii. one ounce; compound syrup sarsapa- riila, three ounces. Take a teaspoonful after each meal and at bedtime. A few doses is said to relieve almost any case of bladder trouble, frpquent urinadon, pain and scalding, weakness and backache, pain above the kidneys, etc. It Is now claimed to be the method of curing chronic rheumatism, because of its direct and positive action upon the ellmlnative tissues of the kidneys. It gives, them life and power to'sift and BtVain (he poisonous waste matter jand uric acid from the blood, rellev- :lng (he worst forms of rheumatism land kidney and bladder (rouble*. The extract dandelion actarnpon (he stomach and liver and is used also extensively for relieving constipation and indigestion. Compound sarsaparllla cleans and enriches (he blood. There lA no»hlng better than K.irgon Compound for the kidneys. This prescription is safe to use at any time. THAT DEPENDS, SAYS SCHOPPE. PILES CIBED IX « TO 14 DAY.**. POZO OINTMENT is guaranteed to ctire any case of itching, blind, bleed ing or protruding piles in 6 to It days or money refunded. oOc. Frank Smitli is Home. Frank E. Smith has returned from .spveral weeks visit at his old home In Maryland. This was Mr. Smith's first visit therel In several years. . He has had a splendid time. Water in Branson Man's Gauge May or May Not Represent Total Rainfall. Bronson. kasi..'not. 24. )J)OS. To the Register:,— I placed a two gallon jar In the open last Monday evening before the rain. The water in \ it measures exactly eight inches this morning. Will Mr. ISchoppe please tell us through the Register if that represents eight inches of rainfall since Monday. Respectfully, W. H- IRELAND. When this communication was referred to William A. J. Schoppe, chler of the lola weather bureau, he said: "Whether the water In the jar exposed by Mr. -Ireland represents- eight inches of rainfall depends on the ex-" posure. The precipitation might havje been more or less, according to thp location of the jar. For instance, if the Jar was placed near a board, or near any object where the rainfall |mlght splash Into the jar. it would register more water than really fell. Then again, the wind might have caused sprays of water to dash into the jar, showing more rain in the receptacle than really fell. Without knowlpg the exact conditions under which the water In the. jar was biv talned I cannot answer definitely. Mr. Ireland's query. If hft will get a sbarpe edge jar. place it in the open, free from olijects of any kind and at an elevation of three or fottr feet, he will have almost an ideal 4?xpoHure and fairly accurate rain gitage." SHOWS AN INCREASE Registration of Voters Will Probably Be Heavier Than Last Spring. "I believe that the registration will be heavier this time than.it was last spring," Charles E. Wendorff, city clerk, said this morning. "We ire checking over the books and will probably have the figures to announce tomorrow." i l-ast spring the total registry was 2,080. It is estimated that the present registry will show 2,200 voters. W. H. Hough- Goes Home. W. H. Hough has returned to Jiis home in 'Bridger,~Mont., after a fjpw days' visit with his parents. Judge and Mrs. E. Q. Hough. SORES No old sore can heal until th« panse which produces it has been remdvid. External applicatioiis of salves, washes; lotions, etc., may reduce the infiak- ma^<m and assist in keeping the place clean, bu( canaot cure the trouble becsrase they do not reach its source. Old sores exist bwause the blood is infected with impurities and jmisons which are con.stantly being discharged into the place. The nervee. tisstiea and fibres of the flesh are Ic^ in astite of irritation and disease by being didly fed with the germ-laden matter titrough the cixculation, making |t impossible for the sore to heal. S. S.[s. cures chronic spres by its piiiifyijtijf ac^Qu on the blood. It gote down i^td tlig.cixculatipn, and removed tiie poUdn-prodncing germs, inipurities^d morbid matters which axe xfHtmtWlfl hi the failtire of the place to h^. S. S.|tnakes jthe bloc>d pure. Sftih «i|id healthy; then as hew. rich blood is 5. Carried ^ the spot the healing!p «K *Sf »fSf «si?^ ^^^ff /^i,^ X l^^r new tissue ^l .^Jonn, ^heplace fills in ^th firm bealthy>j(tesh ,Md sooil thfrlK »r^ji«S^^ cu«4. S. S. S. vegetkbk the safest and Mtttp^ SowTSdUU^wandanyiBeS^ v v. , gore. •f'^.f^ j^jj^jg^ ATLiMU, OA; OF U HARPE HlfiH SCHOOL TEAM PLATS BB03r* SON: NEXT S4TUBDAY.^ WfLL BE THE SECOND 6AME THE SUNDAY SCHOOL BALLY AT M. E. CHTBCH IS POSTPONED. At the MeeUng of the Women's Christian Temperahee Union liiesday a President Will Be Elected. To .Select Officer.^. On Tuesday afternoon at the meeting of -the local order of the Women's Christian Temperance Union a president will be elected to succeed Mrs. Montgomery who moved several weeks ago to Wichita. Kas. A meeting was called for last Tuesday but because of the John TTrbhams funeral it was postponed. Postponed Bally. Because the nroner literature could not be secured the Sunday School rally which was to have been held yee- terday In the Methodist Episcopal church was postponed two weeks. At this rally an-effort will be made to introduce those who are not attending Sunday school to do so. FBESH f AXDIE.S. Our Chocolates and Bon Bons come fresh from factory every two weeks, put up In pounds and half pounds. Try ihem. WATERS & DANFORTH. Drugs and Jewelrj". . Qnarterij- Meeting. One week from yesterday will be the day for the regular quarterly meet ing in the Methodist Episcopal church. Dr. Bernard Kelly, elder of the dls- trJff, will be here. Play Bronson \ext. On next Saturday the La Ilarpe high school foot ball team meets the Bronson high school team on the local gridiron. A week ago last Saturday La Harpe was vcitorious in a game played on the Bronson field. But because their best player and captain were out of the game, the members of the Bronson team .say that they did not make their besi showing. Their captain has sufficiently recovered from his injuries to be in the game next Saturday. Both teams wi:l work hard all this week getting into OOIKH- tlnn for the game. To Hold Business Ifeeting. The , teacher* of the Presbyterian -chureh Sunday £<Jiool will hold their pi'gular monthly business meeting in Ithe church next Wednesday evening. At this meeting Sunday school work in general will be discussed. "Forward Morenient In Mission's." Yesterday Rev. J. H. Bright, pastor of the Presbyterian church in this city, preached an interesting sermon on '•Forward Movement In Missions." In spite of the Uclement weather a good sized audien</ was present at the ser- .fice. KAUFMAlSt QAPMENTS Mok's vary fine.Stfts $20 value $14.75 A- suit of the very newest shades, clive, mode, shadow stripes of black or' brown, or grey .stripe worsted, m»de Tip in the newest .«;tyle. These g.^nnents are strictly hand tailored throughnnt and thoroughly .sponged— a Bplecditl $:-0 vahie, now on saV, COCXCni WILL MEET IN ADJOUBN ED SESSION TFESDAY NlCHT." ~ ——— 1 MHY CflANfiE^OUNDARY LIN E IT IS BUMOBED THAT PBQCE i VTESTERTi WANTS OUT TOO. W. I- DfinKla" $!tJ.O .<thoo5 All I .eather5<. ONE PRICE J. B, Stetson Hvrs All fAlors. jHdg«^ Os«ar Feast of loU Wfll Ad- dreas MethodLst Episcopal Cknreb Brotherhood This Erening. c THE MAN AROUND TOWN OSTEOPATBT— DB. W .B. ALBBIGHT. Begistered Osteopathic Physician. State Bank Bldg. Phone 145. Only Osteopath In La Harpe. t Personals. E. R. Welker. of Kan.^as City. M -as here vesterday vii-ltinK his uncle. W. S. rord. Prof. ?.Iercer and Owen Limes was in Bronson Saturday on business In connection with the fool ball game between the Bronson team and the La Harpe team, which wi.l lie played hore next Saturday. .Tohn Hanna returned to Fort Scott yesterday after spending Saturday and Sunday morning here visiting his parents. He is attending the buslne.e.s college in that city. Earj Abbey was in Bronson Saturday. Miss Alice Peek returned yesterday from a visit in Colorado. L. E. Marshall returned to Kansas City yesterday afternoon after a short business visit in this city. TO HOLD REVIVALS Kevv Missamore Made AanouneemeBt Yesterday of Prc|iaration for .Sperhil Meetlnirs. Hev. Owen Misamore. pastor of the U. B. church, preached his first sermon on the new conference year yesterday. Mr. Misamore .has worked up,] much interest in his church since he nnie to lola 'and the institution has nade great strides. He is hojdng for, a better year. As a means to this end he will organise >n a short time a personal workers club whose purpose will be to create more interest in the church and add to its membership. This club will urobably start out with a membership of forty. He Is also planning for a revival about Christmas holiday's. To assist him. he will secure an out-of-town mUiister. As a preliminary preparation for the special meetings he will make eevry Sundiyr evening service from now on evangelistic in its character. *WeDidBtN««dJt. • Having lost th,e stiate meeting of the Anti Horse Thl^ Assodation, lola. Is comforting herself' with the reflsc- ttooitbat she didn't need It— Ottawa [Herald. hiiiimttiiriiri The story telling politician took down his spool this morning and un­ ravelled the following yarn: i A prominent Republican politician was rambling around the country a' few days ago and during his travels he stopped at the home of a Democratic friend of his. The Democrat was out at the barn doing his chorea and the Republican hunted him up. They discussed various matters from the popslble election of Brj-an or Taft down to the possible price of wheat n<»xt February. • Finally, the Republican noticed among the Df»mocrat's col- Irction of stock a mule without any ears. "What hpoamo of Vm?" askr-d tSe Rpiiubliran. •;Fro7r -u off last winter." replied the Democrat. '•\\T»y don't you provide him with a new pair?" "Provide him with a new pair! "How?" "Call on Bryan." "On Bryan? WTiaf has he got to do with supplying new ears to a mule?" "W.^ll. h«' has been making asses of the Democratic pnrty for twelve years and providing a new set of ears for a mule nugirt to bo an easy task for one so skilled." for the "oM man." and he has commenced on the men. He has quite a campaien speech when he approaches a voter. We wears a Taft button and when anyone joshes him about it and asks why he Is for Taft he repeats a little poem, a roast on Bryan in answer. In talking to his playmates at school he Is very adroit In his argument. He tells them that the election pf Taft means more tops, marbles and a more liberal Santa Clans. His talk is a winner and he has caused something of a landslide from Bryan among the kids at school. Speaking of kids and politics a can- di;lat»> down at Republican headquar- tf .'.s .said this morning that he had never known the time when the school children were so interested in 1 .1? campaign. He said the boys in the primary department of the city schools fight nearly every day over their party affiliations. /. O. Bol 'Say. pop," said Sheriff f. O. Bol Ijnjror's pood looking youngster a day or two ago. as he crawled up on his f.nthor'.<; lap. "Have you got any more fi" your cards?" >;.". BolIlngT I ."id prrs .-ntPfi his hoy uifli oiip of his p.Trda. annoMn<*ln?- fcl.^ AindJdary for re-election to the of- f.re of sheriff, just for a keep sake. "Vcfr, I. have pot many of them. Why do you want to know. Is not one enoui;h for you?" "V /^K," replied the boy. "but you .sfp there are three or four kids down here that ain't got any and maybe they won't vote right." And so the sheriff gave him some cards and his small ,son Is now one of his best workers. He thinks ne has got the kid vote lined up solid Council Meet*!. The city council will meet in adjourned seskion Tuesday evening. Although it cannot be verified it Is rumored the question of changing the boundary lines of the city so that the Prime Western Spelter Company smel ters in this city will be outside of the city limits will be brought up for con sideration. Since the changing of the boundary lines so that the Cherokee Smelter is outside and consequently exempt from city taxation, it has been persistently rumored that the Prime Western will ask that iheir smelters be placed outside of the limits also. Will Complete Tomorrow. City Clerk F, W, Frevert who i.<? working on the registration books will likely have the count inade by tomorrow evening so that he can officially announce the number of voters in the city. Mr. Frevert has been workinc steadily on the books since they closed last Friday evening. Will Decide Prire of Tickets. At the meeting of the Choral ohih which will be held tomorrow evening the price of the lecture course tickets will be decided. There will also be a regular rehearsal. Judge Foost to Speak. Judge Oscar Foust of lola will address the meeting of the Brotherhood of the Methodist Episcopal church this evening. Every man of the city is invited to attend. Personals. " Mrs, Prather, of Burlington. Kas.. v/ho has been visiting here for, the pas! several days, returned to her honif- yesterday. Miss Amy Wendall of Colony, Kas.. is here visiting friends. Mrs, L, M. McHarley, of Concreto, Is rer>orted quite seriously III, Mr. and ,Mrs. L. T. Mitchell, of Cha- niife, Kas.. is here on a ousiness visit. DEATH OF dLARENCE SEIT2. Tuberculosis Fatal, to Well Known Young lolan. Clarence L. Seltz. aged 22. son of Mr. and .Urs. J. H. Seitz. of 905 East street, died today, death resulting 'roni tuberculosis. Funeral service .vill be held Tuesday afternoon at the family home at ."J o'clock. Burial will be made in the old Tola cemetery. Ste<^le Was Here. W. T. Steelf returned yesterday 'rom .lunction City where he helped 'n the initiation of a class of 65 in the W. O. W. There kas a banquet in connection with tho Initiation and a number of the higher officers of '.he lodse w're .pre.«»ent. Inc'uding Sovereign Conimand»-r, J. C. Root, of Omaha. Here on Business. Cus EngU'hardt of Elsmore in in the city tod.ty on a business visit. PnbUe .Sale. I will sell at public auction at my farm * mii'es south and 2 miles west of Moran. the following described property, commencing at 10 o'clock a. m.. on Wednesday. October 28: Horses—One span of well- broke work horses. C and 7 years old. weight. 1.100 iiounds. no blemishes, well march ed: two yearling colts and one suck- ins •'"It. Cattle—Ten head of choice milch cows selected out of s beard of 100 for their milking quaiitle.';; one Durj- ham bull one year old; nine head of calves. Three shcat.s and four hundred chickens. Implements. Etc—One farm wagon one^plow. one walking harrow, two buggies. Household furniture—One cupboard, one stand table, one extension table, one iron bed stead, one sewing machine, one organ, rocking chairs, and other articles'too numerous to mention. Terms of Sale—.\il .sums of $10 and under, cash; over that aroounl a credit of 0 months wll! be given on approved notes bearing 8 per cent interestifrom date. Four per cent discount for cash on time amounts. Xo property to be removed until terms of .sale are complied with. MRS. MLVXIE ENGSTBOM. Col. H. D. Sm<ick. Anctioneer. .• ^ ' W. F. Young. Clerk. Trolaii MEANS JUST WHAT FT \ Better than any other poWder on the market Ne glyccfiiMilia Its eenpesKlen. Voei not frci^ no matter how cold. Absc^t^ danger In handllngl, "D»Trojan Instead of j glycerine save the Uves ef yeinr. ^od yonr company from fcrnnglt snHs. - !••

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free