The Courier-News from Bridgewater, New Jersey on November 4, 1987 · Page 6
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The Courier-News from Bridgewater, New Jersey · Page 6

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Bridgewater, New Jersey
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Wednesday, November 4, 1987
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Page 6
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A-6 Wednday, Novembf 4, 1987 THE COURIER-NEWS ELECTION '87: Legislative results Incumbents win Assembly race in Dist. 23 Democrats recapture Hudson By The Associated Press DISTRICT 23 : lb: Richard A. Zimmer, R William Schluter, R By MICHAEL DREWNIAK Courier-News Staff Writer FLEMLNGTON - Two Republican incumbents one from Mercer County, the other from Morris County won re-election yesterday to the state Assembly in the 23rd Legislative District The Republicans overtook Hunterdon County's only candidate on the ballot Democrat Edward Boccher of Lamberville for the two Assembly seats in the district which covers parts of five counties. Incumbents Richard Kamin of Mount Olive in Morris County and William Schluter of Pennington in Mercer County also defeated Democrat Frederick Katz Jr., of Mount Olive. Former Assemblyman Richard Zimmer of Delaware Township,, elected to the Senate in a March special election, was unopposed for reelection to the Senate. Richard Hall, Hunterdon Democratic chairman, lamented the strength of the opposing party, while Boccher insisted he will not be deterred by yesterday's results. "I've committed myself to being here for a long time," he said. "You've not seen the last of Ed Boccher." Unofficial tallies from the five counties gave Schluter 10,709 votes, Kamin 10,403 votes. Boccher took 4,412 votes and Katz received 3,981 votes. In Hunterdon, 29,505 voters or 65 percent of the county's 45,722 registered voters cast ballots in the Assembly race. Zimmer received 12,914 votes, or 28 percent of the county's registered voters. Predictably, the Republicans were the heavy favorites going into the election, although many Democrats who are accustomed to losing in the district suggested Boccher had a chance. Boccher's law practice is in Clinton and he is a former state deputy attorney general. He had hoped to cross party loyalties and appeal to geographic interests by reminding voters he was the only Assembly candidate from Hunterdon. Last night, Kamin and GOP party leaders called Boccher's strategy pa- T0wn Senate Assembly Zimmer Boccher Katz Kamin Schluter Alexandria 370 121 103 328 328 Bethlehem 492 142 154 418 412 Bloomsbury 141 40 36 113 121 Califon 180 84 77 131 142 Chester Boro 188 53 58 181 175 Chester Twp. 712 133 127 647 650 Clinton Town 430 143 129 323 354 Clinton Twp. 1,132 301 265 947 959 Delaware Twp. 946 338 299 717 741 Flemington 483 187 145 379 408 Franklin (Hunt.) 472 144 138 394 422 Frenchtown 146 71 73 109 115 Glen Gardner 120 35 35 100 99 High Bridge 405 153 156 321 335 Hampton 165 53 49 129 141 Holland 626 203 192 518 521 Kingwood 588 202 171 477 472 Lambertville 565 450 386 332 377 Lebanon Boro 131 32 30 118 124 Lebanon Twp. 614 199 197 503 518 Milford 181 67 69 134 149 Mount Arlington 322 118 118 288 283 Mount Olive 2,353 1,141 1,150 2,005 1,988 Netcong 291 104 114 261 243 Raritan Twp. 1,525 586 471 1,210 1,233 Readington 1,405 376 350 1,213 1,215 Roxbury 2,760 808 835 2,491 2,457 Stanhope 743 239 258 562 554 Stockton 111 61 53 72 76 Tewksbury 821 168 160 690 713 Union Twp. 402 94 96 356 361 Washington Twp. 1,730 412 411 1,561 1,551 West Amwell 353 131 117 273 297 Mercer County 3,741 1,218 1,226 3,153 3,486 Warren County 1,690 673 697 1,493 1,451 Totals 27,334 9,280 8,945 22,947 23,471 The Democratic candidate in Hudson County defeated three others for the county executive's office, while voters in Atlantic and Mercer counties returned their county executives to office yesterday. In Hudson County, Democrat Robert Janiszewski of Jersey City defeated Republican Thomas Hart, also of Jersey City. With 99 percent of the precincts reporting, Janiszewski had 66,933 votes to 29,385 for Hart During his campaign, Janiszewski charged that county government was run inefficiently and said he would bring Hudson County into the 21st century by improving services. "We're just delighted that the Democratic Party pulled itself together after 10 years of being in a state of depression," he said last night. "People came home to where they belong here." In Atlantic County, incumbent Republican Richard Squires defeated Democratic challenger Mary Haynie for a second four-year term. Unofficial returns gave Squires 28,158 votes to 14,631 for Haynie. One of the main issues in the race was the Atlantic City Airport in Pomona, which officials want to expand to include more service to attract more people to the gaming resort. Both candidates agreed a solution must be found to end the struggle between city and county officials over control over the airport. In Mercer County, two-term Executive Bill Mathesius, a Republican, narrowly defeated three-term Democratic Assemblyman Joseph L. Bocchini Jr. Unofficial returns from all precincts gave Mathesius 40,664 votes to 39,940 for Bocchini. I i) l Richard Kamin, R rochial and insisted the 23rd District legislators, including Hunterdon's Zimmer in the Senate, represent a team covering the interests of the diversified district. "The parochialism of having a legislator from your county is not the main reason you vote for a candidate. You vote for them because of their proven ability," said Henry Kuhl, Hunterdon GOP chairman. Said Kamin, "There are those that wanted to play parochial politics, but Hunterdon County is only 45 percent of the district. Our strength is that we serve as a legislative team, without concerns for boundaries." 'I've committed myself to being here for a long time. You've not seen the last of Ed Boccher.' Edward Boccher losing candidate ELECTION '87: Statewide issues Complete statewide results Bond issues for prisons, parks win OK By The Associated Press I I M FARMLAND PRESERVATION: Ap-TT I proved by 68 percent. The farmland 1 M. referendum decided whether to increase the portion of the bill for buying farmland paid by the state, reducing the counties' share in preservation efforts. lip FACILITIES FOR MENTALLY ILL: TT Approved by 70 percent. A fourth ques-II V tion asked voters to consider redirecting $10 million from a loan guarantee fund to stimulate nursing home development for mental health institutions. State officials said lower interest rates and other sources of funding allowed the change. The money is designated for expanding community-based psychiatric facilities and renovating two buildings at Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in Parsippany-Troy Hills. SHERIFFS TERMS: Rejected by 59 JTK percent. Supporters of the referendum II " on sheriffs said it would reduce re-election expenses and allow the officers, once trained, to put their expertise to use longer. Essex County Sheriff Thomas J. D'Alessio noted that he had waged four campaigns in six years in office two primaries and two general elections. Supporters said the nay vote on the baseball issue and the position of the sheriff's question one the ballot the bottom may have contributed to its defeat. dium may have affected the prison bond issue. But opponent James Hemm, executive director of the non-profit research group Association on Correction, said the margin showed more voters were beginning to understand that building more prisons and putting more people in them was not the only solution to crime. The new prison space would house 3,295 inmates. Corrections officials say the total prison population hovers around 17,000, nearly triple the average of the 1970s. Tentative plans for the new money include converting a military ship into a floating prison; building a 325-inmate close-custody unit and a 750-bed medium-security facility; creating a new unit for alcoholic and drug-addicted prisoners; and expanding existing state prisons and county jails. I f PARKLAND PRESERVATION: Ap-TJ proved by 62 percent. The third question TT on new spending asked if the state should issue $100 million in bonds for parkland, cultural centers and historical preservation under the Green Acres program. Of the money, $35 million would go for land for recreation and conservation; $40 million to improving cultural centers; and $25 million to restore historic structures. The measure had no organized opposition, although preservationists said even more money is needed. In addition to the rejection of the baseball stadium question, New Jersey voters turned down a proposal to extend the terms of county sheriffs but approved more space for prisoners and parks. In other statewide ballot questions, voters agreed to allocate $10 million more for mental health facilities and alter the state's use of previously approved funds to buy development rights to preserve farmland. IJ, -f PRISON BOND ISSUE: Approved by 60 I percent. The $198 million bond issue to TT raise money for prison construction had drawn the support of three former governors and five former attorneys general, who said the funding was urgently needed to reduce overcrowding. Opponents had said rejecting the bond issue would send a message that mandatory sentencing laws have swollen the prison population and are expensive, unfair and useless against hardened criminals. The margin of victory was narrower than both sides had expected. "If the stadium issue had been non-controversial and if the stock market had stayed up, the vote would been higher," said Corrections Commissioner William Fauver. He said the public debate over increasing the state's indebtedness for a sta SPLIT: More Legislative strife expected District 34 Miller, GOP (i) 21,891 - 27 percent Zecker, GOP (i) 22,482 - 27 percent District 35 Girgenti, Dem (i) 18,176 - 35 percent Pascrell, Dem 17,459 - 34 percent District 36 Gill, Dem 21,236 - 28 percent Duch, Dem 20,829 - 28 percent District 37 Baer, Dem (i) 27,100 31 percent Mazur, Dem (i) 27,327 - 31 percent District 38 Schuber, GOP (I) 20,975 - 27 percent Roma, GOP 19,320 - 25 percent District 39 Rooney, GOP (I) 26,806 - 31 percent Randall, GOP (i) 27,685 - 32 percent District 40 Kern, GOP (i) 25,355 - 35 percent Felice, GOP (i) 24,598 - 34 percent Senate District 1 Hurley, GOP (i) 28,699 - 53 percent District 2 Gormley, GOP (i) 30,082 - 73 percent District 3. Zane, Dem (i) 32,323 63 percent District 4 Dalton, Dem (i) 24,388 - 59 percent District 5 Rand, Dem (i) 24,630 - 69 percent District 6 Laskin, GOP (1) 30,176 - 53 percent District 7 Costa, Dem (i) 26,534 - 64 percent District 8 Haines, GOP (1) 28,181 - 67 percent District 9 Connors, GOP (i) 34,520 - 64 percent District 10 Russo, Dem (i) 30,227 59 percent District 11 Pallone, Dem (I) 28,173 - 60 percent District 12 Gagliano, GOP (i) 30,734 67 percent District 13 Van Wagner, Dem (i) 24,135 - 51 percent District 14 McManimon, Dem (i) 25,295 - 66 percent District 15 Stockman, Dem (i) 29,101 71 percent District 16 Ewing, GOP (I) 14,080 - 70 percent District 17 Lynch, Dem (i) 18,561 - 63 percent District 18 Paterniti, Dem 30,425 59 percent District 19 Weiss, Dem (I) 25,897 58 percent District 20 Lesniak, Dem (1) 3,305 100 percent District 21 Bassano, GOP (I) 27,835 53 percent District 22 DiFrancesco, GOP (i) 18,809 - 69 percent District 23 Zimmer, GOP (1) 27,758 100 percent District 24 Dumont, GOP (1) 27,613 100 percent District 25 Dorsey, GOP (1) 20,613 53 percent District 26 Brown, GOP (1) 25,161 74 percent District 27 Codey, Dem (1) 752 74 percent District 28 Rice, Dem (1) 5,485 - 79 percent District 29 Llpman, Dem (1) 10,148 100 percent District 30 Orechlo, Dem (I) 17,974 51 percent District 31 O'Connor, Dem (1) 21,869 78 percent District 32 Cowan, Dem (I) 17,924 63 percent District 33 ' Jackman, Dem (1) 12,055 59 percent District 34 Bubba, GOP (I) 21,822 53 percent District 35 Graves, Dem (1) 20,613 100 percent District 36 Ambroslo, Dem (I) 20,602 50 percent District 37 Feldman, Dem (I) 29,741 67 percent District 38 Contlllo, Dem (I) 20,743 53 percent District 39 Cardlnale, GOP (I) 29,580 67 percent District 40 McNamara, OOP (I) 26,845 72 percent Legislature District 1 Salmon, Dem 27,114 - 26 percent LoBiondo, GOP 28,122 27 percent District 2 Kline, GOP (i) 26.237 33 percent Cooper, GOP (i) 25,580 - 32 percent District 3 Collins, GOP (i) 27,411 27 percent Stuhltrager, GOP (i) 27,819 - 27 percent District 4 Riley, Dem (i) 22,505 - 27 percent Marsella, Dem (i) 22,766 - 28 percent District 5 Bryant, Dem (i) 25,053 - 35 percent Roberts, Dem (i) 24,508 34 percent District 6 Shusted, GOP (i) 30,958 - 28 percent Rocco, GOP (i) 32,045 29 percent District 7 Kalik, Dem (i) 24,714 - 30 percent Foy, Dem (i) 23,871 - 29 percent District 8 Colburn, GOP (i) 27,629 - 33 percent Shinn, GOP (i) 27,259 - 33 percent District 9 Hendrickson, GOP (i) 33,700 32 percent Moran, GOP (i) 32,684 - 31 percent District 10 Doyle, Dem (i) 27,995 27 percent Singer, GOP (i) 26,351 - 26 percent District U Villane, GOP (i) 25,699 - 28 percent Palaia, GOP (i) 25,971 - 28 percent District 12 Bennett, GOP (i) 28,730 - 32 percent Farragher, GOP (i) 27,043 - 30 percent District 13 Smith, GOP (i) 24,641 - 27 percent Kyrillos, GOP 24,109 - 26 percent District 14 Clmino, Dem 23,401 - 31 percent Patera, Dem 22,504 - 30 percent District 15 Watson, Dem (i) 26,162 - S3 percent Naples, Dem (i) 26,520 - 33 percent District 16 Kavanaugh, GOP (i) 15,484 38 percent Penn, GOP (i) 13,403 - 33 percent District 17 Schwartz, Dem (i) 18,430 32 percent Smith, Dem (I) 18,014 - 31 percent District 18 Pelly, Dem (I) 30,292 30 percent Spadoro, Dem 28,938 - 29 percent District 19 Karcher, Dem (i) 23,467 - 27 percent Otlowskl, Dem (1) 24,098 - 27 percent District 20 Hudak, Dem (i) 21,176 - 37 percent Deverin, Dem (1) 21,490 - 38 percent District 21 Hardwlck, GOP (1) 29,913 30 percent Genova, GOP (1) 27,655 - 28 percent District 22 Franks, GOP (i) 26,810 39 percent Ogden, GOP (i) 28,606 - 42 percent District 23 Kamin, GOP (i) 23,115 35 percent Schluter, GOP (1) 23,613 36 percent District 24 Llttell, GOP (I) 20,748 -.35 percent Haytalan, GOP (1) 21,528 36 percent District 25 Albohn, GOP (i) 23,537 36 percent Frelinghuysen, GOP (i) 27,895 43 percent District 26 Loveys, GOP (I) 21,520 33 percent Martin, GOP (1) 22,985 35 percent District 27 McEnroe, Dem (I) 688 - 36 percent Bush, Dem 701 - 37 percent District 28 Adubato, Dem (1) 5,100 38 percent Zangarl, Dem (1) 4,765 - 36 percent District 29 Brown, Dem (1) 9,636 43 percent Mattlson, Dem 1,729 39 percent District 30 Crecco, GOP (1) 21,633 32 percent Kelly, OOP (1) 22,530 - 33 percent District 31 Doha, Dem (1) 20,582 38 percent Charles, Dem (I) 21.035 39 percent District 32 Impreveduto, Dem 16,928 32 percent Kronlck, Dem 15,477 29 percent District 33 Menendes, Dem 11,233 28 percent Kenny, Dem 11,386 29 percent "We didn't have Gov. Kean's coattails, but we did have his help in the campaign, and I feel very fulfilled by the results" Assembly Speaker Charles L. Hardwlck Continued from Page A-1 going against incumbents, and trying to gain something we didn't have, and I think a 20 percent increase in our delegation's strength is a major accomplishment," said Alan Karcher, D-Dist. 19, the former speaker and current minority leader. The one politician who appeared to gain most from the overall results was Senate President John Russo, D-Dist. 10, a probable contender for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination in 1989. He raised more than $1 million an unprecedented cam been out of the question had his party lost the Senate. "It's certainly better being in this position than not, if you have that (gubernatorial) goal in mind," he said. paign warchest for a state legislative leader and he used it for distribution to Democratic legislative candidates in tight races. Russo acknowledged that a race for the governor's office would have The one Senate gain came in the 18th district in Central Jersey, where Democratic Assemblyman Thomas Paterniti defeated GOP Sen. Peter Garibaldi by a comfortable margin. In the Assembly, the Democrats picked up eight seats four in traditionally Democratic Hudson County, two in Bergen County, one in Mercer County and one in Cumberland County that had been lost in the 1985 Kean landslide. Losses that dealt a crucial blow to the Democrats's hopes of retaking the lower house came in the 10th district in Ocean County, where former Assemblywoman Marlene Ford attempted a comeback, and in the 13th district, where former Assembly members Jacqueline Walker and William Flynn also were defeated. Karcher said Democratic Party officials had asked that voting machines be Impounded for recounts in those districts. He and Russo also predicted the shrunken GOP majority would force the Republicans to make trade-offs on issues such as property tax and car insurance reform, and give Kean more leverage to play one side against the other on matters that have earned him past opposition from members of his own party. "We expect to work more closely with the Democrats in the Assembly and in the Senate," replied Hardwlck, echoing a dusty sentiment he expressed two years ago before a round of .battles on the same issues. BALLPARK: Defeated 2 to 1 at polls week signed a 30-year lease extension on their Bronx stadium. "I don't understand why the taxpayers have to fund it," said Roger Lawrence of Somerville. But Henry Johnson of Plalnfield turned out to vote yes. "It's extremely important that New Jersey has a major league team with its name on it, That kind of potential for the state is exciting," he said. "There are a lot of people in New Jersey who feel that New Jersey should have more national visibility." Jim Congo of Somerville also voted yes, "because of the need for jobs." Proponents said the stadium would have generated 5,668 jobs during construction. But Congo said the Yankees and Mets could stay where they are. "I'd rather for Jersey to have Its own (team)," he said. "I don't want no second-hand team." Continued from Page A-1 Supporters, Including the governor and many business and union leaders, had pointed to economic benefits that could come from the new stadium, proposed for a 248-acre Lyndhurst tract two miles from the Meadowlands. But those opposed contended the projections were overly optimistic and that the stadium would cost far more than planned, create traffic havoc and divert funds from , other needy areas. Of six public questions on the ballot, the baseball bond issue sparked the most Interest. Several Central Jersey voters said they went to the polls specifically to cast ballots on the issue both for and against, One Raritan Borough voter cited "the cost, and, plus, the Yanks are going to stay in New York," The Yankees, once considered a possible tenant for the stadium, last

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