The Tipton Daily Tribune from Tipton, Indiana on November 18, 1964 · Page 8
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The Tipton Daily Tribune from Tipton, Indiana · Page 8

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Tipton, Indiana
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Wednesday, November 18, 1964
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Page 8
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PAGE 8 800,000 MOUNTAIN PEOPLE 14,300,000 LOWLAND PEOPLE I MOUNTAIN TRIBE REGION KEY FACTORS IN SOUTH VIET NAM— Here are locations of the major "Montagnard" tribes In South Viet Nam,.y?hieh are a strong factor In the struggle against the Communist-led Viet Cong. It Is believed that if the Saigon regime fails to keep the tribes loyaL the Viet Cong.will be strengthened. NUCLEAR BACKING - Phillip M. Hannan, auxiliary bishop of Washington, is shown at the Ecumenical Council in Home, where he challenged the council's proposed statement deploring all nuclear weapons and asking their outlawing. Bishop Hannan said nuclear weapons have kept the peace in certain cases and that the proposed ban should be considered very carefully. Almanac By United Press kiternational Today is Wednesday, Nov. 18, : the 323rd day of 1964 with 43 to follow. The moon is approaching its ull phase The morning stars are Venus, Jars and Jupiter The evening stars are Jupiter and Saturn On this day in history: In 1883, the U. S. adopted Standard Time and the nation was divided into four, time zones. • In 1903, the U. S. and Panama signed a treaty which led ip the building of the Canal Zone In 1939, John L. Lewis was elected president of Congress of Industrial Organizations. On The Lighter Side United Press International WASHINGTON (UPI) — The third edition of Webster's International Unabridged Dictionary has been a source of controversy ever since it was published in 1961. Some critics contend that the old second edition was a better work of lexicography, ond I'm inclined to agree. I base my opinion on a comparison I made the other day when I looked up the definition of "punkah wallah." The second edition defines "punkah wallay" as follows: . 'A coolie who operates a punkah, usually hy pulling a rope attached. to the punkah and leading over a pulley through the wall to the veranda, where the punkah wallah sits." Vivid Word Picture Is that not a splendid definition? It not only tells us what punkah wallah is, it gives us a vivid word picture of a punkah wallah in action. Now compare that, if you please, with the third edition, which' defines punkah wallah as the operator of a punkah." That's all it says. Just "the operator of a punkah." Nothing about -coolies, ropes, pulleys, verandas or holes in the wall. In fact, if we didn't know what punkah was, the third edition's defintion of punkah wal­ lah would be virtually meaningless. Fortunately, both editions provide fairly lucid definitions of punkah. They agree that it is a device for fanning a room, consisting of f r a m e covered with canvas and suspended from the ceiling or of a large fan held in the hand. Both Display Weakness But in defining wallait, ^ both editions display weakness. 1 The second edition says wal­ lah is an "agent; a master or owner; a servant or worker.-" That seems to fit the third edition's definition of punkah wal­ lah as "the operator of a punk­ ah The third edition defines wal­ lah as: "1. A persons who is associated with a ' particular type of work or who performs a specific duty or service. 2. A persons who holds an important position in an organization or in a particular situation. That seems to fit* the second edition's definition ; of a punkah wallah. Certainly amy coolie who sits on the veranda pulling In 19J50, the 'U. S. ; Navy patrolled the Carribean to guard, „ . , . . , „ against a Cuban invasion, rope that leads through the wall Central America. | ov « a Pulley tc, the punkah holds an important position, rn a particular situation. If, there, Webster would combine the second'edition's definition of punkah /wallah with the third edition's -. definitions of punkah and wallah, / it would have, in my opinion, a much better dictionary. Above for Mem. PMs Nov. 16 A thought for the day — Former President Thomas - Jefferson said: "Never buy what you do not want because it is cheap; it will be dear to you." . PLANT NOW Now's the t i m e to plant spring-flowering bulbs, tka 9. S. Department of Agriculture says. Set them firmly into the ground so there are no air pockets underneath. Plant crocuses, glory- of - the - snow,- • grape hyacinths and snowdrops with the tips of the bulbs two inches below the surface. Set iris three inches deep; hyacinths, four in. ches; tulips, six to seven; daffodils, six to eight. v FARE TRAP LONDON (UPI)—Faredodgers on London's district line subway trains had a total of • $2,500 in fines and court costs imposed tion on them Tuesday. . (was done in expectation of The 95 were trapped in ft post-election rally. However, he four - hour check between Ba- notes, odd-lotters have once, ron's Court and Wimbledon more become sellers on bal Wall Street Chatter NEW YORK (UPI)—Newton D. Zinder of E. F. Hutto.n Co.. Inc. says that the odd-lot figures are, providing further evidence that the next market move may be upward. , Zinder points out that the small investor shed' some of his caution-just prior to the elec and speculates that this Sept. 22. 1 ance. CARTER'S THE TIPTON DAilY TRIBUNE ' Wednesday, Nov. 18, FRESH FROZEN TOMS 20-25 lb. US. GOV'T INSPECTED CENTER CUTS PORK CHOPS lb. Ground Beef 3 B 1 EMGE Smoked Picnics SILVER SHIELD BACON ANGEL FLAKE Cocoanut 7oz.Box ™ c BIG "C" CONTEST FREE BICYCLE Cut every Big C from Carters Finest Milk or Ice Cream carton. Sign them and put in oar ticket box. Lucky winner Sat., Dec. 12,1964. Be here— It may be you. FRESH 2 Packages io lb. 79* NO. 1 MAME POTATOES NEW CROP TANGERINES doi. 79 DEL MONTE TURLEY WINESAPS APPLES 4ib 49 c LARGE CALIFORNIA CELERY 29' PUERTO RICA YAMS m Size 17' OLIVES / 303 Size MANDALAY CRUSHED PINEAPPLE FROZEN BANQUET . PUMPKIN PIES Reynolds He^vy Puty 1&Inch For Your lurkey-—Regulat 69ic Size 19 29* NESTLE'S CHOCOLATE CHIPS PENNANT MARSHMALLOW

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