The Ottawa Herald from Ottawa, Kansas on January 28, 1963 · Page 19
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The Ottawa Herald from Ottawa, Kansas · Page 19

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Ottawa, Kansas
Issue Date:
Monday, January 28, 1963
Page:
Page 19
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Tall Fescue Tops In Grazing Tests Tall fescue topped the list of four cool season grasses in grazing trials at the East, Central Kansas experimental field near Ottawa. Results of the 1961 fall and 1962 spring trials have been summarized by J. E. Braum, superintendent of the station. Production of the four grasses was compared by measuring the pounds of animal gain per acre, average daily gain per head and pounds of hay produced per acre. Tall fescue ranked first in the 1961 fall trials with 201 pounds of animal gain per acre and 1.46 pounds average daily gain per head. Smooth brome was second with 188 pounds of animal gain and 1.40 pounds average daily gain. Orchardgrass produced 168 pounds of animal gain per acre and 1.25 pounds average daily gain per head, while reed canary grass was the least productive with 163 pounds of animal gain and 1.22 pounds average daily gain per head. The 1962 spring results showed tall fescue still at the top with 229 pounds of animal gain per acre and 1.35 pounds average daily gain per head. Canarygrass produced 221 pounds of animal gain and 1.34 pounds average daily gain per head. Orchardgrass yielded 201 pounds of animal gain and 1.62 pounds average daily gain per head. Smooth brome' produced 181 pounds of animal gain per acre and 1.81 pounds average daily gain per head. Tall fescue also ranked number one in hay production with 2,995 pounds to the ! acre. Canarygrass produced 2,223 pounds of hay, followed by Orchardgrass with 1,939 pounds and smooth brome with 1,829 pounds of hay to the acre. This experiment was started in 1956 when these four grasses were planted with alfalfa for compari- sor at different fertility levels. The past and current results of these trials are being presented in detail this winter at county agronomy and livestock schools in Southeastern Kansas by E. A. Cleavinger and W. A. Mover, Kansas State University extension specialists. THE OTTAWA HERALD Monday, Jan. 28, 1963 See Economic Prospects In Forest Improvements LOOKING OVER RECORDS - Frederick Wood, RFD 3, Ottawa, Franklin County ASCS office manager, shows Agriculture Stabilization and Conservation Service Committee some office records. Committee members are (from left), Russell Wray, RFD 4, Ottawa; Glen Crowley, Williamsburg, and Ray Farris, RFD 3, Ottawa. Wray is committee chairman. (Herald Photo) A forest tree improvement project just initiated in Kansas through the Kansas Agricultural Experiment station could have important economic implications for the state, according to Dr. Paul Roth, research forester at Kansas State University and project leader. Roth notes that there are 1,633,000 acres — approximately three per cent of the land area of the state — in timberland. But he notes that only a fraction of the present timber area is properly managed and that additional acreage probably is best suited to some form of forest management. But any accelerated timber improvement program must include research in genetics and selection if timber management is to realize optimum production, Roth points out. The research program just getting underway is the first project of its kind ever undertaken in Kansas, and one of the first in the Great Plains area. The Kansas work will be in cooperation with experiment stations in nine other states in the North Central region. One important objective is to determine adaptability of various geographic origins of tree species to the North Central region. Roth already has initiated Kansas plantings including 20 origins of Austrian pine, 30 origins of Scotch pine and 17 origins of Red oak. He plans to plant an additional 19 origins of Red oak this spring, and to initiate plantings of Ponderosa pine and Cottonwood within the next year or two. Other K-State research will include selections and hybridization work for Black walnut and Eastern redcedar. While much of this is basic work, Roth points out that many side benefits are likely for Kansas. For instance, the study of Scotch and Austrian pine variations may yield information valuable to Christmas tree growers. And the Red oak evaluations may uncover superior strains of treei which would be useful as shade trees or in windbreaks. "Over - cutting, grazing and fires have left nearly all-Kansas farm woodlots in serious depleted condition, and in some stands the valuable species have been eliminated," Roth says. "Losses due to insects and disease, for instance the recent heavy mortality of elm, provide an excellent opportunity for regeneration of Kansas farm woodlots through replanting and underplanting." Uncle Sam Helps With Conservation By.LAMAR PHILLIPS franklin County landowners contemplating the improvement of their farms through establishment of soil conservation practices can receive substantial assistance from the Soil Conservation Service, including payment by the federal government of portions of the cost of many practices. For example: Vegetable Cover — Initial establishment of a permanent vegetative cover for soil protection or as a needed land-use adjustment, 80 per cent of the cost of eligible seed not to exced $8 per acre; required available nitrogen, 10 cents per pound; required available phosphate, 7 cents per pound; required available potash, 4 cents per pound; eligible fencing, $1 per rod; help ranging from 50 to 70 per cent of the cost for clearing, with limits ranging from $10 to $20 per acre. Application of Lime — 50 per cent of the cost not to exceed $1.50 per ton. Controlling Competitive Shurbs — 50 per cent of the cost of approved chemical and mechanical treatment not to exceed $5 per acre. Dams, Pits or Ponds — 10 cents per cubic yard for required earthen fill; 50 per cent of the cost of reinforced concrete not to Windbreak More Than Windbreak Does a windbreak do more than break the wind? This is a question frequently asked Harold Gallaher, extension forester at Kansas State University. His answer is yes. Trees used in windbreaks produce seed, berries and fruit for wildlife during cold weather, serve as nesting places for some birds and provide cover and protection from predators and severe winter weather. By retaining their needles and providing a desne cover, evergreens retard wind. They are needed to compensate for the deciduous trees in the windbreak which lose their leaves in the winter. "The combination of a row or more of red cedar and a row of Austrian or ponderosa pine is the 'backbone* of a winter windbreak," Gallaher said. Red cedar holds its branches down to the ground, giving protection there. Pines grow much taller than red cedar and protect over a wider area. Both Austrian and ponderosa pines will get to be 60 feet tall in some areas. The other pine available through the K-State tree distribution program is the Scotch pine. It is used largely in Christmas tree plantings. Orders for trees, shrubs and stratified walnut and pecan nuts are being taken at county Extension and work unit conservationist (SCS) offices. exceed $20 per cubic yard; 50 per cent of the cost of devices to protect pipe inlet; 50 per cent of the cost of pipe; $1 per rod for approved fence. Sod Waterways — Initial establishment of permanent sod waterways to dispose of excess water without causing erosion, 75 per cent of the cost of shaping, filling or grading the waterway area, not to exceed $90 per acre of hydraulic designed, area. Terraces — $3.50 per hundred linear feet. Diversions — $3.50 per hundred linear feet for height of 1.5 feet; $4.50 per hundred linear feet for height of 1.9 feet or greater. Erosion Control or Detention Dams — Applicable to detention dams, 14 cents per cubic yard of required earthen fill; 70 per cent of the cost of reinforced concrete not to exceed $28 per cu- bic yard; 70 per cent of cost of devices to protect pipe inlet; 70 per cent of cost of pipe. Applicable to dams other than detention dams, 10 cents per cubic yards of required earthen fill; 50 per cent of the cost of reinforced concrete not to exceed $20 per cubic yard; 50 per cent of the cost of devices needed to protect pipe inlet; 50 per cent of the cost of pipe; $1 per rod of approved fence. Outlet Works — 50 per cent of the cost of earth moving not to exceed 10 cents per cubic yard of required earthen fill; 50 per cent of the average cost of rin- forced concrete used in permanent structure excluding forms not to exceed $20 per cubic yard. Open Drainage Systems — 10 cents per cubic yard of earth moving; 50 per cent of the cost of clearing not to exceed $10 per acre. CONSERVE OUR SOIL FOR THOSE GENERATIONS YET TO COME C«« CH 2-4700 How 97 Farmers out of 100 Can Get the most out of their Willing Acres... Soil Conservation Practice Consult Irvin Ross, Work Conservationist for the Franklin County Soil Conservation District. Here's an EXCELLENT Example... ... of what proper management of pastureland will do. The fence in the picture does not mark the division of two different kinds of soil, rainfall, climate or any other natural factor which should cause these two pastures to nro- duce different kinds of grass. The fence does divide the property of two farmers and all other factors being equal, the management the farmers have given the pastures is what makes the difference. Through proper management, and by working with nature instead of against her, the one farmer has maintained an excellent stand of grass. The other man through abuse has only weeds, brush and undesirable grasses. To finance the improvement or expansion of your farming operation at low cost and on the most convenient basis, see us. LOANS FOR BUILDINGS LOANS FOR EQUIPMENT LOANS FOR FARM LAND Our long experience in handling all phases of farm financing assures you of helpful, cooperative service. 4% PAID ON SAVINGS r L We Urge You To Attend the Soil Conservation Meeting Wed., Jan. 30th Memorial Auditorium Ottawa FREE Noon Dinner CITIZENS STATE BANK POMONA, KANSAS Member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation their future prosperity depends on you! SAVE OUR SOIL! AIL LIFE SPRINGS FROM THE PRACTICE SOIL CONSERVATION -WHENEVER, WHEREVER YOU CAN! On the farm . . . protect land from soil erosion through scientific planting and crop rotation. Away from the city ... be careful with matches and open fires. Attend the SOIL CONSERVATION Meeting WEDNESDAY, JAN. 30 Memorial Auditorium Congratulations to the following award winners who have excelled in Soil Conservation Work: * Mr. & Mrs. Tom McMillen, RFD 2, Wellsville * Mr. & Mrs. Bill Price, RFD 2, Ottawa * M. & Mrs. Charles Hamilton, RFD 2, Pomona, THE NORTH SIDE BANK Tecumseh and Main CH 2-2052 R. S. Hill, Pres. Ed Hosier, yice Pres. and Cashier Mamie Sands, Asst. Cashier Glen Haywai-d, Asst. Cashier Hov/ard Deputy, Asst. Cashier Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation .

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