The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas on January 13, 1986 · Page 12
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The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas · Page 12

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Salina, Kansas
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Monday, January 13, 1986
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Page 12
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Raggedy Ann a hit in Russian MOSCOW (AP) - Muscovites are enchanted by the inaugural visitor in the new U.S.-Soviet cultural exchange program — a singing and dancing personification of Raggedy Ann, the rag doll beloved by generations of American children. The first American theater troupe to visit the Soviet Union since 1979 is doing eight sold-out performances of a musical based on the Raggedy Ann tales. The official premiere of "Rag Dolly" was last week in the the Children's Musical Theater, a large modern complex in Moscow's Lenin Hills. About 1,000 Soviet adults and children packed the hall for the Broadway-style musical, a form of theater that is rare here. The crowd gave a three-minute standing ovation to Ivy Austin, who plays the red-haired doll, after she sang the title song in Russian. She also received loud applause for translating occasional words into Russian with dramatic asides. A narrator gave the audience an oral synopsis in Russian before each of the two acts. "We just loved it, loved it!" said Tamara Derevyanshchikova. "I am only unhappy that I don't speak Ivy Austin (left) as Raggedy Ann and Tricia Brooks as Marcella perform on the Moscow stage. English. I've never seen a musical before, but I can say that I really like this kind of theater." Her 12-year-old son, Alyosha, said he wanted to see "lots and lots more" American shows. A 9-year-old boy named Volodya stood in line for autographs. "I love this American theater," he said. "I especially liked the dolly." Members of the 90-member troupe caused a sensation at intermission when they passed out letters from school children in the Albany, N.Y., area and were surrounded by Soviet youngsters eager for American pen pals. "Rag Dolly" is a production of Albany's Empire State Institute for the Performing Arts. No other troupe has staged it. The musical's book and lyrics are by William Gibson, author of "Golden Boy" and "The Miracle Worker." Joe Raposo of "Half a Sixpence" and "You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown" wrote the music. Producing director Patricia Snyder said she began discussing a visit two years ago with Natalya Sats, director of the Moscow Children's Theater. The deal could not be concluded until the new cultural agreement was signed at the November summit in Geneva between President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, replacing the one that expired in 1979. The Salina Journal Monday, January 13,1986 Page 12 Heart disease to take monetary toll in 1986 SARASOTA, Fla. (AP) - Treatment of heart and circulatory disease, by far the country's main cause of death, will cost an estimated $78,6 billion this year, the American Heart Association said Sunday. "That's a real figure, and it's going up," said Dr. Thomas Ryan, president of the association. The estimate equals about $325 for every man, woman and child in the United States. The costs include $48.2 billion for hospital and nursing home services, $13.6 billion for lost work time due to disability, $11.8 billion for doctor bills and $5 billion for medicines. Last year, the association estimated these diseases — which include heart attacks, high blood pressure and strokes — cost $72.1 billion. Ryan said some of the costs might be reduced if physicians would be more discriminating in the ways they use medical technology. For example, even though a patient technically might be a candidate for blood vessel surgery, he said, physicians should learn to ask whether it's wise to put him through the procedure. Sometimes, the same results can be achieved through drug therapy, researchers have found. "I'm not sure that because we can, we should all the time," Ryan said. "I think we've got to pay attention to the dispersement of this high- technology care." The cost figures were in the annual brochure, "Heart Facts," released at a science writers forum sponsored by the association. Cardiovascular diseases kill twice as many people each year as cancer and 10 times as many as accidents. In 1983, the last year for which accurate figures are available, 989,400 Americans died from heart and circulatory diseases, compared with 440,620 who died from cancer and 91,290 from accidents. The largest number — 55 percent — died of heart attacks, followed by strokes, high blood pressure and rheumatic fever. But the outlook has improved. Deaths from all forms of cardiovascular disease declined 31 percent between 1972 and 1983. The decline has been attributed to such lifestyle changes as better diet and exercise, as well as to improved medical care. Still, more than 63 million Americans, or one in four people, suffers from some form of cardiovascular disease. The most common of these disorders is high blood pressure, which afflicts nearly 58 million people. This figure is nearly 20 million higher than the association estimate last year. SAUNA AUTO SALVAGE If we don't have it we tan get it Telephone Service to 65 cities 1 V> Miles North on Highway 81 827-5686 Amtrak cuts back on services WASHINGTON (AP) - Fewer . Amtrak passenger trains were running Sunday as service cuts took effect on major routes because of a 10 percent reduction in federal support, a spokesman for the railroad said. The cuts reduce service between cities on such routes as Chicago- Detroit, Washington-Atlanta-New Orleans and Chicago-Salt Lake City- Seattle. All 24,000 miles that Amtrak serves, however, will keep at least some passenger service. The cuts were announced last month following congressional approval of a $616 million federal Amtrak subsidy for fiscal 1986, which began Oct. 1. Last year's subsidy totalled $684 million. The cuts took effect Sunday, Amtrak spokesman John F. McLeod said. Service cuts on the East Coast include: • New York-New Orleans: The daily "Crescent" will continue to operate daily between New York and Atlanta, but only three days a week between Atlanta and New Orleans. Daily service will resume after March 20 when ridership normally increases. • New York-Savannah, Ga.: The "Palmetto" will be reduced to three times a week south of Washington, resuming daily service after March 20. • Philadelphia-Harrisburg, Pa.: Two of 11 round trips will be eliminated. In the Midwest: • Chicago-Detroit: The eastbound morning "Wolverine" and the westbound "Twilight Limited" will be reduced from daily service to three times a week, on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. • Chicago-Carbondale, 111.: The Chicago to Champaign-Urbana "II- lini" will be extended to Carbondale to replace service on the Chicago- Carbondale "Shawnee." • Chicago-Valparaiso, Ind.: The "Calumet" commuter train between the two cities will keep its current schedule, providing one daily round trip in place of the service now provided by it and its sister train, the "Indiana Connection.'' • Chicago-St. Louis: Of the six daily trains between the cities, the "State House" will drop Saturday service southbound and Sunday service northbound. In the West: • Chicago-Salt Lake City-Seattle: The "Pioneer" will be reduced from daily service to three times a week west of Salt Lake City through March 20. sniimmin rmniimmis CARL'S T^ PIANO i I SERVICE Carl F. 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